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Name found on underside of a fingerboard


Violadamore

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The violin appears to be an American "folk" fiddle. The neck has been nicely grafted, and pegholes bushed ditto. Has a nice sound when working, BTW. Confirmable oral history places it on the bluegrass circuit for at least 12 years, but its ultimate origin is unknown. Any observations are welcomed. I just did a neck set on it thanks to a previous repairer having used "liquid hide glue" instead of the good stuff :lol:.

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No label or other internal markings that I've found. The violin could be fairly old, or just someone's over-the top antiqueing, practicing techniques or something. I just got the fingerboard replaced and am getting the setup started.

I guess whoever made it hadn't been told how to glue a "book" :). The bizarre thing is that the design is so crude yet the repairs are so good. That line on the back isn't a join, it's a repaired crack in a one-piece that peters out at each end. The cleating inside is well done, too.

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The most logical answer (to me) would be that when removing the fingerboard on a violin that is being repaired, it would make sense to put the name of the maker of the violin on the fingerboard so you put the fingerboard back on the correct violin.

A further anecdote: A friend of mine owns a violin labeled Vuillaume. The fingerboard came off and there was a Vuillaume signature under the fingerboard in pencil. I thought it was proof the violin was actually a Vuillaume...but it's not.

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The most logical answer (to me) would be that when removing the fingerboard on a violin that is being repaired, it would make sense to put the name of the maker of the violin on the fingerboard so you put the fingerboard back on the correct violin....

The most logical answer (to me) would be that whoever made the fingerboard wrote his or her name on it. This would be logical to me because I do the same thing.

There would be no need write the name of the maker of the violin on the fingerboard to ensure putting the fingerboard back on the correct violin, because the chance that the fingerboard would fit on the wrong violin would be exceedingly small.

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When I am making my violins I usually write the name of the customer or the violin in the same spot so I can make sure to keep the fingerboard and fiddle together.

dito , it does not have to be the luthier's name. I write my customer's name under the chinrest all the time . I could very well imagine someone doing the same with the fingerboards

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There would be no need write the name of the maker of the violin on the fingerboard to ensure putting the fingerboard back on the correct violin, because the chance that the fingerboard would fit on the wrong violin would be exceedingly small.

There are people out there who wouldn't be phased by an ill-fitting fingerboard! :wacko:

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