Sign in to follow this  
Guy Harrison

Purfling white- quarter or slab?

Recommended Posts

I’m making soon some poplar veneers for the purfling of my next instrument.

I was wondering if anyone knows if the Cremonese cut the middle white veneer on the slab or on the quarter. Perhaps it's not so important but I’m curious.

These two drawings show the grain direction:

1. This way?

post-28884-0-81560900-1350001882_thumb.jpg

2. Or this way….?

post-28884-0-11902400-1350001905_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would use sketch 2. Why?

I've never done purfling but laminating and heat bending I have done

lets look at sketch 1.

if you heat bend the laminate surely the wood will come a part at the grain ?

also when you plane it flat you will find it will break under the surface at will

but this is just MHO I am sure some one better suited will come along and give you the right advice

James

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Guy,

the way I remember the correct direction of the grain is that the veneer should be cut the same way a rib is cut.

This way you see the medullary rays in poplar as longish lines parallel to the purfling as seen in Cremonese instruments.

In your case that would be like drawing Nr 1.

Best regards, Hans

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-28844-0-67252000-1350043078_thumb.jpgI like making the purfling on the slab and then the flame on the quarter.

This is a del gesu on my bench I am finishing up for a client in texas - I like seeing flame in the purfling. - so No.2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The maple veneers I bought for making my own, were all cut the same way, slab.

The process of veneer cutting has changed due to technology, these days the veneers are sliced off the log by giant blades.

In the old days the veneers were all hand cut from the log.

Even if you wanted to use quarter sawn veneers, after gluing them together and making purfling, you'd end up with slab cut purflings !

Lastly, if anyone looks close enough at your purfling to see medullary rays you're either at a violin making competition or in a morgue.

Most players don't even care.

Best wishes.

Cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do mean drawing 1 but: yes I think you are right, the lines I am referring to are probably just pores cut along their length (not medullary reays).

Hans

Thanks Hans! That makes sense. I'll go with that and see how it looks.

Cheers,

Guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ben you are invited over to my morgue any time for drinks HAHA!

This is a photo that Bruce Carlson has uploaded in the past of a Nicolo Amati violin - the purfling appears to be "No 2"

post-28844-0-96877500-1350044324_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Andrew- I had a Del Gesu at work sometime ago and saw a similar kind of purfling white. Very different looking to Stradivari. Maybe 'purfling no.2' would be easier to make with a plane being a slab veneer which may have suited Del Gesu.

post-28844-0-67252000-1350043078_thumb.jpg I like making the purfling on the slab and then the flame on the quarter.

This is a del gesu on my bench I am finishing up for a client in texas - I like seeing flame in the purfling. - so No.2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Andrew, a tall glass of chilled Absinthe please....

You can certainly see flecks in some of the old purflings, I think Conor uses other woods and gets a nice effect.

I use pearwood, not much grain to notice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here you go Guy, you will have to forgive the cell phone camera - its still dark here in Utah yet and I'm behind the shadow of Mt. Ogden for several more hours before day light in my workshop for natural light. Just my 3000k led workshop lights.

This is slab cut maple whites with maple dyed hand scraped blacks made to look uneven as possible

post-28844-0-42020800-1350045768_thumb.jpg

post-28844-0-63936900-1350045805_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

anymore i use pearwood for my blacks. I can't stand purfling blacks that shatter on me. But i keep experimenting with the whites getting variations of flame. Its a bit harder to work with some woods but love seeing the medulary rays and fleck and such under varnish. - And Guy - you are right... the first time I noticed this was when I had the "Ex-Ferni" Del Gesu in my hands I noticed the purfling glinted a bit when I tilted it.. Just a tiny bit but it was there. My gut feeling tells me that Del Gesu simply planed down a rib and used that for purfling whites instead of sourcing out some additional species of wood.

One of my favorites is Guadaginis though... Its such simple purfling but I love how it stands out. Bland - but it sticks out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Andrew, a tall glass of chilled Absinthe please....

You can certainly see flecks in some of the old purflings, I think Conor uses other woods and gets a nice effect.

I use pearwood, not much grain to notice.

I do Ben, but I don't make the purfling in sheets and then cut it up. I plane the whites off the edge of a thin piece of wood, usually something soft like lime, but I love willow. They wind up with the quartered edge showing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.