I need information dendrochronology


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So what's the verdict - mid 20th century made using early to mid-19th c. wood?

Don't think so, mid 19th century Mittenwald was always my opinion, very likely re-varnished, or at least seriously "got at" (as many were due to their unstable varnish). That was what I thought before the dendro, and the tests seemed to fit exceedingly well with that.

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Don't think so, mid 19th century Mittenwald was always my opinion, very likely re-varnished, or at least seriously "got at" (as many were due to their unstable varnish). That was what I thought before the dendro, and the tests seemed to fit exceedingly well with that.

I apologise if I offended you by my use of the controversial term "dandruffchronology".

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Hi,

Here is a squashed image of part of the front. Doing this always shows precisely where the joint (if any) is located, and there isn't one.

In any case, it is simply inconceivable to obtain the very strong results we did from the dendrochronological tests across the whole width had we (Micha Beuting, the others and myself) "missed" a joint

.

Thanks for the explanation. I can see from the photo that there is no joint.

I mistook the second line from the left for a joint on the first photo

post-5577-0-57042200-1350001373_thumb.jpg

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The numerous parallel scratches on the back - I wonder what would have caused that "naturally"?

...dare i say, 20th century sandpaper?

Stephen,

It is very difficult to do with the image.

Incisions are looking surface. Not under varnish. They are not natural. In all probability the suitcase inside, or even bow. Yes, they are probably made ​​in the 20th century.

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is there anyway of knowing if the corner blocks and end blocks are original? maybe you could get carbon dating on a small sample from an end block?

Four side blocks and the lower block are original. Since the revised button above violin back, I'm not sure that the upper block of the original.

How would you get the carbon dating?

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that would be quite pricy. But Vlado knows that the violin is at least 100 yrs old...

robertdo,

I know that my violin for 40 years. Everything else is tradition, by word of mouth.

Interesting are estimated over the internet, which I have stated in post # 32nd.

These answers to the assessment of my violin, based on the images, have made major auction houses and their appraisers.

Is not that strange?

At least a little strange?

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Stephen,

It is very difficult to do with the image.

Incisions are looking surface. Not under varnish. They are not natural. In all probability the suitcase inside, or even bow. Yes, they are probably made ​​in the 20th century.

I agree that they are not natural; they are man-made.

Not from the violin case - there is not enough room inside the case to make such long, straight (not random), and parallel scratches. Whatever dings or dents the bow might make would be on the top, not the back;

how does the bow touch the back when the violin is in the case?

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I agree that they are not natural; they are man-made.

Not from the violin case - there is not enough room inside the case to make such long, straight (not random), and parallel scratches. Whatever dings or dents the bow might make would be on the top, not the back;

how does the bow touch the back when the violin is in the case?

often the violin is held against the belly and either strummed or just at rest-a belt buckle or various buttons etc can cause such scratching on the back.

Oded

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Here's a few, highlighted in green.

I find them curiously right-handed, and have seen similar patterns in forged antiques where a stain is darker in areas where there were similar efforts at simulated wear pattern using a scraper type tool or low grit sandpaper in single passes. I could be mistaken; it is merely intriguing to see so many perfectly straight lines in a uniform directional pattern.

For comparison:

Marked lines look like damage violin.

Look at the picture with the arrow keys.parallelscratches.jpg

dsc03808002.jpg

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True, although I've seen some grits where the grains were really far apart.

I find it interesting also that even the "worming" is at the same angle as the artificial (whatever tool produced them) scratches.

Oded's observation about buttons is interesting, but I don't think it applies here. How would the marks would be produced in that way given either the direction or linear consistency of the marks? They would be more

random, less linear and less consistent. It's very hard to fake random; people tend to do things symmetrically.

I think it's just bad antiquing, sorry.

post-39490-0-72805500-1350313165_thumb.jpg

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