Bridge was soaped


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I prefer pencil lead to lube the string notches.

Who said "baddaboom ...chhhh...(symbol sound)" I think a much better cymbol sound would be Tssssssssssss (if it's a ride cymbol)!

AAhhh, I always considered the follow up sound to be a high hat (semi-closed)!!! Anyway, I don't see anything wrong with burnishing a nice half round as a string groove, little graphite couldn't hurt either (I do that). I certainly wouldn't leave a V notch for the string to grab on to. jeff

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  • 1 year later...

I've been using The Art of Violin Making as a guide on my first instruments and the authors recommend burnishing the bridge with dry soap and paper. 

I tried this out and it didn't seem to do much for the wood.  

I was hoping for that darkened look most bridges on instruments have.

 

What do most makers use to seal a bridge?

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I've been using The Art of Violin Making as a guide on my first instruments and the authors recommend burnishing the bridge with dry soap and paper. 

I tried this out and it didn't seem to do much for the wood.  

I was hoping for that darkened look most bridges on instruments have.

 

What do most makers use to seal a bridge?

In due time bridges get sealed with bow rosin.

 

If you want to smooth the wood you can use an old dull single cut file which will nicely burnish the surface.

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when I took my cello in for a set up it came back with tape on the A,D string but also the bridge had a different colour to it and I asked what had happened to my bridge and the Luther said " It's been soaped "

can some explain why a luthier soaps the bridge

James

Why don't you ask your luthier who would know better than any of us?
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I learned to finish the bridge with a wipe of teak oil. My bottle has lasted for years, and has more or less settled on the side of the bottle, so all that's left is a very thin oil. I polish the bridge on a piece of writing paper on the bench.

 

I hang the bridge blanks in the window, and this gives a nice mature colour. I have quite a few, and date them. I use blanks bought at least five years ago if I can.

 

if I recut the top of a bridge for any reason, and there's a pale patch, I touch it up with my neck rag, which has years of pigment in it, and gives a nice old wood colour, but if you do that on a whole bridge, it will look dirty.

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I do all of my bridge cutting and shaping with planes and files. I follow that with a nail file 'card' (about the size of a tongue depressor) which has 4 different grits on a foam board. The finest grits (white and grey) are similar to Micromesh. I don't know the exact grits but they are extremely fine. My final finish is achieved by using a piece of polished stone which burnishes the surface. The end result looks as if the bridge has a thin coat of varnish on it as it is quite glossy. Rosin has a much tougher time grabbing hold of the surface.  

 

Barry

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