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"Il Cannone" Poster Package


Joel Pautz
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As a long time reader and first time poster, I'd like to thank all of the contributers to this forum, and its moderator Mr. Holmes. I'm sure the wealth of information shared through this forum is appreciated by many like myself who do not yet have the expertise to contribute. I hope to take a more active role in the forum soon, and though I still don't have the answers, I will be asking a few questions.

As the title states, I received my "Il Cannone" poster in the mail yesterday. As far as I know the poster of this instrument is no longer available through the Strad Library. I was able to purchase it through the Dynamic website at this URL: http://www.dynamic.it/e_scheda.php?pid=95 . I first found out about this offer through maestronet, but here are a few answers to the questions I had before it arrived.

First and foremost, It IS the Strad poster, and NOT one independently put together by Dynamic. It is credited to Bruce Carlson, Alberto Giordano and Pio Montanari. It has arching templates (for both long and cross arching), plate graduations, and all the typical specs including for the scroll and the f-holes.

Also included are a CD of Salvatore Accardo playing upon the Cannon, and an exceptional (but small) book which left me asking for more. The book has text in Italian, English, French, and German. It is divided into 4 chapters. (The History of Paganini's violin, Chronology of Paganini's life, "Il Cannone" and typical features of Guarneri instruments - by Alberto Giordano along with Cesare Candi's 1937 report, and a few Photographs). There are great photos throughout of premier violinists with the Cannon. Candi's report is only 1 page, but his technical drawings (though small) are great.

Finally I'll close with two questions:

First, Is the instrument depicted on the poster as it was before its most recent restoration overseen by Bruce Carlson, or as it is after the restoration? (The book makes no mention of this more recent portion of Il Cannone's life, so my guess is the book was put together before the poster was?)

Second, if possible Mr. Carlson, could you outline some of the similarities and differences between the more recent restoration of The Cannon, and Cesare Candi's in 1937? For example, I believe that you've suggested on the forum before that it is a great aid (when making a new instrument modeled on an old one) to spend some time sketching its details beforehand so as to become familiar with them. Did you draw out technical drawings of "Il Cannone" as well? Which other old/traditional methods towards approaching an instrument's restoration are invaluable? Which older methods when approaching a restoration have been done away with, or simply improved upon with the technology available today? If the restoration were conducted today, would it have been almost a 'given' that the instrument undergo a CAT scan?

If anyone else in interested in "The Cannon", this website is very helpful: (http://www.paganini.comune.genova.it/violi_guarneri_eng.htm). It also outlines what procedures were carried out during the afore-mentioned restorations.

Thanks everyone,

Joel

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Thanks for posting the link to get the poster. I can't answer any of your questions, but can recommend you post a reply later on. This will bring the thread back up to the top of the first page. That way maybe the people you want to answer your questions will have a chance to see the thread. Welcome to Maestronet!!!

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In looking at the restoration photos page I see what I believe is the old fingerboard being held upside down. The underside hollowing seems to stop quite a bit shy of the neck interface, looking almost like a manufacturer's profile. Wouldn't it be customary to blend this more elegantly up towards the neck?

E

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If anyone else would like to contribute thoughts about the evolution of restoration techniques, I'd be happy to hear them. I did not mean to specifically ask only Mr. Carlson for an answer.

They were: "Which other old/traditional methods towards approaching an instrument's restoration are invaluable? Which older methods when approaching a restoration have been done away with, or simply improved upon with the technology available today? If the restoration were conducted today, would it have been almost a 'given' that the instrument undergo a CAT scan?"

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As a long time reader and first time poster, I'd like to thank all of the contributers to this forum, and its moderator Mr. Holmes. I'm sure the wealth of information shared through this forum is appreciated by many like myself who do not yet have the expertise to contribute. I hope to take a more active role in the forum soon, and though I still don't have the answers, I will be asking a few questions.

As the title states, I received my "Il Cannone" poster in the mail yesterday. As far as I know the poster of this instrument is no longer available through the Strad Library. I was able to purchase it through the Dynamic website at this URL: http://www.dynamic.it/e_scheda.php?pid=95 . I first found out about this offer through maestronet, but here are a few answers to the questions I had before it arrived.

First and foremost, It IS the Strad poster, and NOT one independently put together by Dynamic. It is credited to Bruce Carlson, Alberto Giordano and Pio Montanari. It has arching templates (for both long and cross arching), plate graduations, and all the typical specs including for the scroll and the f-holes.

Also included are a CD of Salvatore Accardo playing upon the Cannon, and an exceptional (but small) book which left me asking for more. The book has text in Italian, English, French, and German. It is divided into 4 chapters. (The History of Paganini's violin, Chronology of Paganini's life, "Il Cannone" and typical features of Guarneri instruments - by Alberto Giordano along with Cesare Candi's 1937 report, and a few Photographs). There are great photos throughout of premier violinists with the Cannon. Candi's report is only 1 page, but his technical drawings (though small) are great.

Finally I'll close with two questions:

First, Is the instrument depicted on the poster as it was before its most recent restoration overseen by Bruce Carlson, or as it is after the restoration? (The book makes no mention of this more recent portion of Il Cannone's life, so my guess is the book was put together before the poster was?)

Second, if possible Mr. Carlson, could you outline some of the similarities and differences between the more recent restoration of The Cannon, and Cesare Candi's in 1937? For example, I believe that you've suggested on the forum before that it is a great aid (when making a new instrument modeled on an old one) to spend some time sketching its details beforehand so as to become familiar with them. Did you draw out technical drawings of "Il Cannone" as well? Which other old/traditional methods towards approaching an instrument's restoration are invaluable? Which older methods when approaching a restoration have been done away with, or simply improved upon with the technology available today? If the restoration were conducted today, would it have been almost a 'given' that the instrument undergo a CAT scan?

If anyone else in interested in "The Cannon", this website is very helpful: (http://www.paganini.comune.genova.it/violi_guarneri_eng.htm). It also outlines what procedures were carried out during the afore-mentioned restorations.

Thanks everyone,

Joel

Hi Joel,

Many questions about how the Cannone is set up now will be answered if you take the time to read the proceedings of the conference we had in Genoa after the work was completed in 2004. It's on this link Cannon link and the proceedings are on this link Proceedings.

Bruce

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In looking at the restoration photos page I see what I believe is the old fingerboard being held upside down. The underside hollowing seems to stop quite a bit shy of the neck interface, looking almost like a manufacturer's profile. Wouldn't it be customary to blend this more elegantly up towards the neck?

E

The fingerboard you see in that photograph was put on after Candi's restoration in 1937; this includes the maple wedge. Both were removed and a copy was made of the fingerboard by Nicolas Sawicki in Vienna in 1828 which incorporates the wedge in the fingerboard.

Bruce

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If anyone else would like to contribute thoughts about the evolution of restoration techniques, I'd be happy to hear them. I did not mean to specifically ask only Mr. Carlson for an answer.

They were: "Which other old/traditional methods towards approaching an instrument's restoration are invaluable? Which older methods when approaching a restoration have been done away with, or simply improved upon with the technology available today? If the restoration were conducted today, would it have been almost a 'given' that the instrument undergo a CAT scan?"

I guess you could call this devolution resotration because the instrument was restored to its original appearance prior to various modernization operations carried out after 1937 by some of the earlier violinmaker/conservators of the instrument.

A CAT scan was contemplated but was not possible at the time without moving the instrument out of the museum which was logistically impossible. There was enough to do only concentrating on the restoration but a CAT scan or similar will certainly be done in the future. I rarely resort to CAT scans specifically for a restoration but I have had them done on some important instruments mostly for additional information otherwise invisible; for example, how the linings are let into the blocks, nail position and size on nailed necks, etc. X-rays are also useful for this and are easier and less expensive. One thing I dislike about the actual situation here in Italy is the impossibility to save the raw scanner data so that it can be re-elaborated later if needed. It is something I brought up with John Waddle when he visited last time in Cremona.

Actually I'm afraid that John Waddle and Dr. Stephen Sirr together with Michael Molnar will immediately flood the market with exact CNC Cannon replicas varnished by David Burgess and Melvin Goldsmith! :lol:

Bruce

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As I understand things, there are two posters/graduation maps of the thicknesses of this violin, and both are different, so it is something to keep in mind.

Perhaps those who know more can comment on the descrepancies.

Hi DBurns,

I had the poster long ago, and I would expect the same poster Joel has received.

I will order one and see if there is any change just in case.

Buddulph data is an other reliable source, as a reference. I personally saw, a couple of discrepancies between these two sources, and posted one here in the forum.

However both may be correct since this is DG, design, any thing is possible. :)

Bruce posted a picture of inside the rib of an other DG violin, basically, it was toothed blade marks, left thin thick lines side by side.

Many thanks to Bruce again, He generously, has been sharing such delicate informations on this great violin and others.

Another source, that I use, is Borman's article prepared with two other researchers. It is color coded presentation and really helps me, especially when building such a complex top.

The article has been posted here while ago.

This is some thing I processed in image editor to highlight the graduation, you may find it helpful, not sure.

post-6639-0-01491100-1344184337_thumb.jpg

post-6639-0-74531500-1344184349_thumb.jpg

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Hi DBurns,

I had the poster long ago, and I would expect the same poster Joel has received.

I will order one and see if there is any change just in case.

Buddulph data is an other reliable source, as a reference. I personally saw, a couple of discrepancies between these two sources, and posted one here in the forum.

However both may be correct since this is DG, design, any thing is possible. :)

Bruce posted a picture of inside the rib of an other DG violin, basically, it was toothed blade marks, left thin thick lines side by side.

Many thanks to Bruce again, He generously, has been sharing such delicate informations on this great violin and others.

Another source, that I use, is Borman's article prepared with two other researchers. It is color coded presentation and really helps me, especially when building such a complex top.

The article has been posted here while ago.

This is some thing I processed in image editor to highlight the graduation, you may find it helpful, not sure.

Hi Selim,

A map was made by Cesare Candi and is published in Nardi's book. It does not represent at all the graduations of the Cannone and is more likely a graduation pattern that Candi himself could have used. Il liutaio Cesare Candi e il violino Paganini (1948) - Nardi, Carlo

Another set of graduations was taken by Renato Scrollavezza while he was violinmaker/conservator of the violin and these, if memory serves me, were included with the poster in the first pubblication of the box from Dynamic.

The third set of graduations are those from the Biddulph pubblication taken by Roger Hargrave and John Dilworth.

The graduation map by Bruce Berg was supposed to be an average of the Dynamic and the Biddulph pubblications.

Bruce

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Hi Selim,

A map was made by Cesare Candi and is published in Nardi's book. It does not represent at all the graduations of the Cannone and is more likely a graduation pattern that Candi himself could have used. Il liutaio Cesare Candi e il violino Paganini (1948) - Nardi, Carlo

Another set of graduations was taken by Renato Scrollavezza while he was violinmaker/conservator of the violin and these, if memory serves me, were included with the poster in the first pubblication of the box from Dynamic.

The third set of graduations are those from the Biddulph pubblication taken by Roger Hargrave and John Dilworth.

The graduation map by Bruce Berg was supposed to be an average of the Dynamic and the Biddulph pubblications.

Bruce

Hi Bruce,

Thanks Bruce, great information and links.

Just going through the documents from the link for a while, I see the original bridge has a different design.

post-6639-0-00975300-1344690535_thumb.jpg

Apparently still some discussions are going on the bridge.

I see the same design from a very detailed pic posted here some time ago.

post-6639-0-13303700-1344690234_thumb.jpg

This was the post here some time ago and the bridge seems the same design.

post-6639-0-05479900-1344689738_thumb.jpg

Wondering if the violin has this design of bridge currently especially in the recordings coming with poster.

Just tradition or some other reason beyond it?,, is a different topic, I think.

Thank you again, really appreciate every single word and picture you post.

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Hi Bruce,

Thanks Bruce, great information and links.

Just going through the documents from the link for a while, I see the original bridge has a different design.

post-6639-0-00975300-1344690535_thumb.jpg

Apparently still some discussions are going on the bridge.

I see the same design from a very detailed pic posted here some time ago.

post-6639-0-13303700-1344690234_thumb.jpg

This was the post here some time ago and the bridge seems the same design.

post-6639-0-05479900-1344689738_thumb.jpg

Wondering if the violin has this design of bridge currently especially in the recordings coming with poster.

Just tradition or some other reason beyond it?,, is a different topic, I think.

Thank you again, really appreciate every single word and picture you post.

Hi Selim,

The first photograph is the original bridge which is not used anymore. It's all explained in the articles.

The second photograph is a copy of the original used for display purposes set up with gut strings.

The third photograph looks like the setup when Maxim Vengerov played it at the Royal Academy of Music in London. He wanted to try the violin with the copy of the original bridge and decided to use it for the concert. It is set up with Evah Pirazzi strings and therefore has the e-string tuner added for the steel e.

Bruce

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Hi Selim,

The first photograph is the original bridge which is not used anymore. It's all explained in the articles.

The second photograph is a copy of the original used for display purposes set up with gut strings.

The third photograph looks like the setup when Maxim Vengerov played it at the Royal Academy of Music in London. He wanted to try the violin with the copy of the original bridge and decided to use it for the concert. It is set up with Evah Pirazzi strings and therefore has the e-string tuner added for the steel e.

The recordings are reissued from the original CD which was done before I was nominated violinmaker/curator for the violin in June of 2000.

Bruce

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Hi Selim,

The first photograph is the original bridge which is not used anymore. It's all explained in the articles.

The second photograph is a copy of the original used for display purposes set up with gut strings.

The third photograph looks like the setup when Maxim Vengerov played it at the Royal Academy of Music in London. He wanted to try the violin with the copy of the original bridge and decided to use it for the concert. It is set up with Evah Pirazzi strings and therefore has the e-string tuner added for the steel e.

Bruce

Thanks Bruce.

...

I think, if my memory is correct, I remember a couple posts that were referring to this concert, with not much impression from Il Cannone, if it is the same concert, not sure though.

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Thanks Bruce.

...

I think, if my memory is correct, I remember a couple posts that were referring to this concert, with not much impression from Il Cannone, if it is the same concert, not sure though.

Melvin Goldsmith didn't like it but I can't find the thread where we were discussing this. During the concert I was backstage, as I usually am, and so it is difficult for me to answer as regards to how the violin carried in the hall. Changing bridges could certainly make a difference but Vengerov was happy with the violin when he stepped on stage.

Bruce

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