Brian Lisus' latest cello


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Brian

Thanks for explaining your use of selenite as a filler...this is done after the dry rub...correct?

If I may then, how long do you cook the raw silver fir balsam and at what temp?

-Ernie

Yes after the dry rub of colored varnish, I then rub the powdered marienglass and then begin the ground coat of varnish.

As to cooking the Strasbourg turpentine for the varnish .. at around 240 to 250 degrees centigrade. Difficult to say for how long as depends on the quantity .. sometimes 30 hours if a small amount, sometimes 130 hours if a large amount. I take a small piece and rub it into a powder and when it has a brownish color know it is done. You can aslo grind a small piece of the resin with some oil to see the color the varnish will have. If too cooked you might lose some transparency. My varnishes tend to be rather bright and dont look at all like old instruments, but are very transparent. They tend to stand out and If I cooked them longer it would probably tone down the red pigments.

In natural light the brightness is rather strong and a bit harsh, however under artificial concert lighting they become alive and the yellow tones become golden and the reds become warmer.

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Well said Ernie. This is turning into a great thread. smile.gif

Last week the sad news of Craig Tucker...and this week the grand news that Brian Lisus has joined MN...

Hope you enjoy yourself and stay awhile... I'm looking forward to learn as much as I can from Brian's input.

-Ernie

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Brian,

I am very happy to see you here. I've always been a great respecter of your work, but even more so of your person (to the extent I can know either from a distance, of course, but you have shown yourself very worthy with regard to each).

I don't hang around as much as I once did (too acidic, the air often becomes), but every now and then do drop in, and this is one moment I am glad I did. Thanks for coming around. :-)

Chris

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Hi James,

You dont really need a toothed surface for the charcoal pencil to stick .. in fact you could even do it on top of a varnish layer as long as you gave it a light sand with roughish micro mesh to matt the surface. The filler or Marienglass is rubbed into the wood and fills the pours ...you can even mix it with water and rub it on too. The dry method seems to work better for me and then you dust it off and will be left with a very thin white glaze, but not a layer. I then rub my ground (varnish) into the wood with my finger and the glaze goes away. It is bit like taking powdered glass and adding water where the glass becomes transparent.

As to the source on the inside. It is a mixture of fresh uncooked Strasbourg turpentine and sun thickened linseed oil. Three parts baslam to one part oil with two percent drier added. Dont let if form a film or layer but burnish it off with a dry lint free cloth.

Firstly however I make a mixture of 2.5 grams alum and 2.5 grams gelatine, each mixed in 25 ml water and heated . Once dissolved I mix the two solutions together and brush it on the inside of the front only, and then wipe the excess off with a paper towel. Then you will see the plate 'warp' and immediately I clamp it to the ribs overnight. ( Not glued) This is to counteract the tension created by the future outside coats of primer. Then after this I go ahead with the source inside but this time on the maple as well.

I dont say this is the best thing to do .... but it seems to work for me. I cannot offer any scientific reasons as to anything I do and most of my ideas are just based on gut feelings.

All the best,

Brian

Ya,pff this guy Brian is clearly "out to lunch" :rolleyes: . I hope you grace us with such amateur suppositions in the future :lol: ....

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Hello Carl .. someone pointed me towards the Maestronet forum as you were discussing my latest cello. I just registered myself so I could reply.

Firstly let me say I did not get Edi, my student to plug the cello, it was his idea to post the link.

As to sharing information like the other violin makers you mentioned. I have posted an hour long video of me making a string quartet covering the entire process. Here is the link and it can also be found on my web site.

This video was initially on my web site as a flash video viewed by thousands of people, but have recently uploaded in onto Youtube

I have had wonderful responses to this video over the last 18 months and have been contacted by violin makers from Iran, Turkey, Eastern Europe whom have asked me all sorts of questions … so I might not participate in Maestronet forums, but I am so grateful that I have been able to pass on information and experiences with other violin makers around the world.

As to the sound of the cello that you refer too … I guess it is a matter of taste and how people interpret sounds differently. I respect your opinion but at the same time it is amazing all the favorable comments and emails to me, that this cello has received, including those from leading cellists around the world.

As to ‘plugging’ my instruments ….. I would like to believe that they speak for themselves considering that I have sold every instrument I have made and have usually enjoyed at least a six month waiting period for most of my career spread out over more than thirty years.

Brian

I am grateful to you for all you taught me through your videos. I am one of those thousands of "youtubers"

I have finished my first instrument and, yesterday, before a concert, drinking coffe with my fellow of the orquestra answered some questions.

I told them that though I had gone to a luthier to ask how he does some things, most of the work I made, was just watching your videos, dozens of times. So Thanks to you Brian

Regards

Tango

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Ya,pff this guy Brian is clearly "out to lunch" :rolleyes: . I hope you grace us with such amateur suppositions in the future :lol: ....

I am now asking myself .. do I really need this in my life ?

I am not trying to prove anything and I am certainly no expert. I just love making instruments … as strange as it may sound I think of the trees growing in the woods when working, the amazing coincidence of how this particular wood landed up on my workbench. I marvel when hearing someone play a beautiful piece of music which lifts one to another world, the coming together of all the varnish resins and oils, the carving of the wood, magical …. so logging into this forum to be insulted will no doubt destroy the wonder and magic that I still enjoy. I like my hibernation !

I do love sharing things I have discovered or passing on things that I have learnt .. and have fellow makers in Iran sun thickening walnut oil and making my varnish, makers in Turkey corresponding with me about aspects of violin making , they are so appreciative and we have a wonderful rapport.

So I am afraid I will be leaving the forum … thanks to those of you who have sent me such lovely mails, feel free to contact me privately. I have no secrets and will gladly share anything with you.

Best wishes,

Brian

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I am now asking myself .. do I really need this in my life ?

I am not trying to prove anything and I am certainly no expert. I just love making instruments … as strange as it may sound I think of the trees growing in the woods when working, the amazing coincidence of how this particular wood landed up on my workbench. I marvel when hearing someone play a beautiful piece of music which lifts one to another world, the coming together of all the varnish resins and oils, the carving of the wood, magical …. so logging into this forum to be insulted will no doubt destroy the wonder and magic that I still enjoy. I like my hibernation !

I do love sharing things I have discovered or passing on things that I have learnt .. and have fellow makers in Iran sun thickening walnut oil and making my varnish, makers in Turkey corresponding with me about aspects of violin making , they are so appreciative and we have a wonderful rapport.

So I am afraid I will be leaving the forum … thanks to those of you who have sent me such lovely mails, feel free to contact me privately. I have no secrets and will gladly share anything with you.

Best wishes,

Brian

Oh the internet. Brian this was stated as a joke. Your method and description of technique is very well put and easy to understand. Wat I'm saying is that you are very good at teaching by writting.

Please take no offense. It was meant to be a compliment

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Brian, If you do decide to stick around, sarcastic wit can sometimes be hard to decipher, things get lost in translation. Pay attention to the "emocons". They often leave clues as to the real meaning of the statement.

In this case the "out to lunch" was backed by an "eye roll"....and the "suppositions" was followed by "lol"...

But then again, you may prefer real life :blink::lol:

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Brian, If you do decide to stick around, sarcastic wit can sometimes be hard to decipher, things get lost in translation. Pay attention to the "emocons". They often leave clues as to the real meaning of the statement.

In this case the "out to lunch" was backed by an "eye roll"....and the "suppositions" was followed by "lol"...

But then again, you may prefer real life :blink::lol:

I am not offended with you ... that is the last of my concerns !

Thanks for the note though.

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Brian , Before you go ...thank you. Very informative posts, and your dedication to education and peace is apparent. I think most here share similar feeling about the trees, the process,the product, the music. There are a few here who have odd humor, and a few that just want a fight,whatever the cost. You probably have little to gain from participation here, however as a student of violin making,I have much to gain from having made your acquaintance :P

As a kid, I remember hearing about apartheid in S.Africa,to grow and see the change and to know that much of the change was brought about by the music of Miriam Macaba, Hugh Massicala, and so many others,

truly and honor and a wonder to be able to talk to you. Six degrees of separation? More like two or three these days.

Guys... Could we at least show some manners around company? Brian has not been here but a few days,and is exactly the kind of member we want here,he doesn't know us so,please, a little kindness won't kill ya.

Respect.

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Guys... Could we at least show some manners around company? Brian has not been here but a few days,and is exactly the kind of member we want here,he doesn't know us so,please, a little kindness won't kill ya.

Respect.

Second. Irony does not travel well over Cyberspace.

Sorry Brian, please reconsider.

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Thanks for those posts and your support …. I have no idea what it must be like to be a student of violin making and then to rely on forums like this for more information so I really understand where you are coming from. I was lucky enough to go to Newark and we had so much offered to us it was amazing.

So yes a part of me would like to stay on here if I can be of assistance to anyone and another part finds the whole scenario most unappealing.

So if any of you want to ask me something privately for my two cents worth, feel free, and then in turn, if you find the info helpful you can post it on the forum.

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I am now asking myself .. do I really need this in my life ?

I am not trying to prove anything and I am certainly no expert. I just love making instruments … as strange as it may sound I think of the trees growing in the woods when working, the amazing coincidence of how this particular wood landed up on my workbench. I marvel when hearing someone play a beautiful piece of music which lifts one to another world, the coming together of all the varnish resins and oils, the carving of the wood, magical …. so logging into this forum to be insulted will no doubt destroy the wonder and magic that I still enjoy. I like my hibernation !

I do love sharing things I have discovered or passing on things that I have learnt .. and have fellow makers in Iran sun thickening walnut oil and making my varnish, makers in Turkey corresponding with me about aspects of violin making , they are so appreciative and we have a wonderful rapport.

So I am afraid I will be leaving the forum … thanks to those of you who have sent me such lovely mails, feel free to contact me privately. I have no secrets and will gladly share anything with you.

Best wishes,

Brian

Don't worry, David Burgess also left in a huff after he joined the first time. He then obviously spent some time thickening his skin and came back lean and mean.

This forum can be enormously helpful, and also enormously frustrating. The moderator Jeffrey Holmes is doing a very good balancing act. His sieve has a large gauge, so it's up to contributors to learn how to handle flack, and up to learners to learn how to sort what is dished up. Pick and choose. The forum can be better than having people over for dinner (you can choose when to go to bed) - or a telephone conversation (you can hang up when you feel like it).

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The forum can be better than having people over for dinner (you can choose when to go to bed) - or a telephone conversation (you can hang up when you feel like it).

Or better still, stick the buggers into your ignore list and never hear from them again. I'm probably saying this to myself at this stage :blink:
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Brian , Before you go ...thank you. Very informative posts, and your dedication to education and peace is apparent. I think most here share similar feeling about the trees, the process,the product, the music. There are a few here who have odd humor, and a few that just want a fight,whatever the cost. You probably have little to gain from participation here, however as a student of violin making,I have much to gain from having made your acquaintance :P

As a kid, I remember hearing about apartheid in S.Africa,to grow and see the change and to know that much of the change was brought about by the music of Miriam Macaba, Hugh Massicala, and so many others,

truly and honor and a wonder to be able to talk to you. Six degrees of separation? More like two or three these days.

Guys... Could we at least show some manners around company? Brian has not been here but a few days,and is exactly the kind of member we want here,he doesn't know us so,please, a little kindness won't kill ya.

Respect.

Hi James .. wonderful post and inspiring to hear your views and interest in South African music during those days of apartheid.

I love humour and actually dont take things too seriously .. I guess I have always enjoyed being out on my own so being confronted just seems so foreign to me and as I have nothing to defend. It makes no difference what others think, but as I have so many other things on my plate at the moment, I would rather focus my time on those things.

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Brian , Before you go ...thank you. Very informative posts, and your dedication to education and peace is apparent. I think most here share similar feeling about the trees, the process,the product, the music. There are a few here who have odd humor, and a few that just want a fight,whatever the cost. You probably have little to gain from participation here, however as a student of violin making,I have much to gain from having made your acquaintance :P

As a kid, I remember hearing about apartheid in S.Africa,to grow and see the change and to know that much of the change was brought about by the music of Miriam Macaba, Hugh Massicala, and so many others,

truly and honor and a wonder to be able to talk to you. Six degrees of separation? More like two or three these days.

Guys... Could we at least show some manners around company? Brian has not been here but a few days,and is exactly the kind of member we want here,he doesn't know us so,please, a little kindness won't kill ya.

Respect.

That would be Miriam Makeba and Hugh Masekela, I guess?

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Hi James .. wonderful post and inspiring to hear your views and interest in South African music during those days of apartheid.

I love humour and actually dont take things too seriously .. I guess I have always enjoyed being out on my own so being confronted just seems so foreign to me and as I have nothing to defend. It makes no difference what others think, but as I have so many other things on my plate at the moment, I would rather focus my time on those things.

Well wonderful to meet you.Being raised in an environment that emphasized the core values of social responsibility ,multicultural awareness and individual creative expression,I appreciate your contributions here.

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James said it well.You're efforts have far reaching effects that you might not even be aware of. As far as the forum goes...I've watched your peace/making video several times...but yesterday when you joined MN it inspired me to make a cooking setup like yours...here is a photo of the beginning stages...I'll probably enclose it with a second half barrel on top...(French wine barrel of course, since Martell is a French name).... :)

Brian I noticed your plywood top with holes drilled in your video...is it safe to cook the Strousburg turp with the lid on overnight?...I will be cooking on an induction top...so no flame.?

Thanks in advance

-Ernie

Hi Ernie,

Pleased to hear that you enjoyed the videos ... Great that you are going to make a varnish cooking set up. A bit dark outside right now otherwise I would photograph mine .. very simple. It is simply a hot plate which rests on the ground. Then a wide pot into which I place a thiner taller pot and surround the bottom and sides with sand to the level of the stuff you are cooking. Then I have that plastic half cut barrel which goes around everything and it is much higher that the cooking pot itself. Then on top of that I place a piece of wood with holes in. The entire motive behind it all was to keep my cats from exploring what was going on in there !!

You dont necessarily have to put anything around it if it is in a safe place although the enclosure does stop any cold breezes cooling down things. I also have a digital thermostat that sits in the cooking balsam and switches the hot plate on and off keeping it at temp of around 240 to 250 Degrees C. I have had mine running not stop 24 hours a day for several days .. every now and again I will give it a stir to get the stuff off from the side.

I hope you could understand all of that ? Oh I would not suggest putting any wooden plank directly on top of the pot or too close as the fumes could well set it alight.

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