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edi malinaric

Brian Lisus' latest cello

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Brian, welcome to the forum. I found your videos very inspiring, especially your use of hand tools over power tools. Your curious cats and music also add sense of calmness to your videos. I was inspired to make a collapsible similar to the one you show in the video.

Just want to say thanks personally for sharing your knowledge.

cheers

John (catnip)

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Brian, thanks for showing up, I hope you will be able to continue posting. Edi, you maniac, thanks for posting the vid. Its ALWAYS great to hear other custom made instruments.

Carl I like your style. I thought that was real clever the way you came across like an A-hole in order to guilt Brian into coming here, very subversive, none of us even suspected a thing ;) Look how well it worked :lol:

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You mentioned you have my of my violins … I have a record of my instruments and wonder which one it is ? Can you let us know what is says on the label … I am more than happy to set it up for you and would love to hear it again too. It would be matter of us connecting somewhere as have no idea where you live.

Best wishes,

Brian

Welcome to Maestronet.

A very kind offer to set-up the violin again. Can you tell me how many instruments you have made?

I look forward to any posts you make here, as I have been enjoying and learning from other stuff you have posted.

So Thanks for all your videos.

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Hello everyone ... many thanks for all your kind words and for making me feel so welcome, much appreciated!

I look forward to maybe partaking in some of the discussions .... many years ago ( 13 years) there was something called Tobi ( I think that was the name), an internet based chat group which was really interesting of which I was a member for about a year and it was a wonderful platform to share ideas.

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Brian ,Thanks for joining us,it's an honor , The peace quartet video is a very inspiring piece. Would you mind going into a bit of detail on the stenciling technique for the backs?

Hello James,

Thanks for the comments. As to the stenciling techniques for the backs ... what I do is apply the primer and then my very 'dry' rub of colour varnish which hardly sinks in but brings out the flame. This followed by rubbing in dry Mareinglass from Kremer. Then you stick your stencil on or do a free hand drawing ( see my web page for photo) using a soft charcoal pencil. This is followed by a light spray of artists fixative. Then you proceed as normal with your ground coat and varnishing. I have been doing this for many years and it works well without any problems of the varnish coming off. One cello I made had a Michelangelo drawing covering the entire back.

All the best,

Brian

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Brian

What is "very dry rub of colour varnish" mean?...Is there pumice mixed in with the colour varnish thus making a thick/dry paste?

Thank you

-Ernie

Hi Ernie,

I put a little bit of walnut oil colour varnish (no pumice) on a lint free cloth .. then dab it on a paper towel and add a drop of turpentine and dabb it again. So there is hardly any varnish on the cloth. I then very lightly rub over the maple gradually increasing the pressure like one would do when French polishing so a very small amount of varnish actually goes in, just enough to highlight the figure of the wood.

All the best,

Brian

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Brian, Thank you for your responce...I just tried a sample piece. fun . I used plaster of paris for the dry rub just befor the pencil. I take it the marienglas ( a gypsum)is used so that a toothed surface will be presented to the pencil.primarily and then the marienglas becomes part of a clear filler with top cotes.Is this correct?

My next question is, What, If you don't mind sharing, is the sauce you used on the inside...after gluing the label?

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Tee-hee-hee!

I hope Brian doesn't mind if I help some of you guys out a little bit:

Brian's been a professional maker for close on thirty years. He studied at Newark. I believe one of his class mates was Roger Hargrave...?

I like the bit of him having made "a few" cellos - come on Brian, don't be naughty - would that be 30...40...50...more?

Anyhow, welcome to Maestronet. You'll like it, if walking down a street in Baghdad on snipers' night is your bag.

(Kotie)

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Tee-hee-hee!

I hope Brian doesn't mind if I help some of you guys out a little bit:

Brian's been a professional maker for close on thirty years. He studied at Newark. I believe one of his class mates was Roger Hargrave...?

I like the bit of him having made "a few" cellos - come on Brian, don't be naughty - would that be 30...40...50...more?

Anyhow, welcome to Maestronet. You'll like it, if walking down a street in Baghdad on snipers' night is your bag.

(Kotie)

Hi Kotie,

I love your metaphor to Bagdad .... looks like I better go back into hibernation or alternatively I had better sharpen up my chisels!

Yes I was in the same class at Newark as Roger Hargrave, John Dilworth, Julie Reed Yeboah, Joseph Thrift and Anne Houssay.

All the best,

Brian

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Tee-hee-hee!

I hope Brian doesn't mind if I help some of you guys out a little bit:

Brian's been a professional maker for close on thirty years. He studied at Newark. I believe one of his class mates was Roger Hargrave...?

I like the bit of him having made "a few" cellos - come on Brian, don't be naughty - would that be 30...40...50...more?

Anyhow, welcome to Maestronet. You'll like it, if walking down a street in Baghdad on snipers' night is your bag.

(Kotie)

Thanks, Jacob, for the clarification.

Even without it, that cello looked good and sounded great in the hands of a very competent player, but your clarification was helpful. Maybe we live in a world where most people need to read a person's resume before they can decide to praise that person's products.

Concerning Baghdad on snipers' night, that sounds like an idea for a movie a lot of people would like. Wouldn't want to speculate how the love of such movies relates to Maestronet.

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Concerning Baghdad on snipers' night, that sounds like an idea for a movie a lot of people would like. Wouldn't want to speculate how the love of such movies relates to Maestronet.

Just BEING on Maestronet (and in some cases, like Brian, not even that) is almost better than the real thing - as in, the Baghdad scenario may be a lot safer.

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Hi Kotie,

I love your metaphor to Bagdad .... looks like I better go back into hibernation or alternatively I had better sharpen up my chisels!

Yes I was in the same class at Newark as Roger Hargrave, John Dilworth, Julie Reed Yeboah, Joseph Thrift and Anne Houssay.

All the best,

Brian

Brian, and would that class be this :)

Standing from left to right:

Maurice Bouette, Joe Thrift, John Dilworth, James Rawes,Patrick Webster, Malcolm Siddal,

Koen Padding, Anne Houssay, Loise Round, Dave "Paganini", Julie Reed, Roger Hargrave,

Paul Weiss, Andrew Fairfax, Ron Thewlis, Brian Stone, Patrick Jowett, Gordon Stevenson, Bill, Glen Collins.

Sitting from left to right:

Brian Lisus, Lionel, Mervin Frost, John Johnston, Juliana Nicholson, Helen Michetschlager, Hans Johannsson

— with Glen Collins.

post-3446-0-47497600-1343243759_thumb.jpg

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Brian, and would that class be this :)

Standing from left to right:

Maurice Bouette, Joe Thrift, John Dilworth, James Rawes,Patrick Webster, Malcolm Siddal,

Koen Padding, Anne Houssay, Loise Round, Dave "Paganini", Julie Reed, Roger Hargrave,

Paul Weiss, Andrew Fairfax, Ron Thewlis, Brian Stone, Patrick Jowett, Gordon Stevenson, Bill, Glen Collins.

Sitting from left to right:

Brian Lisus, Lionel, Mervin Frost, John Johnston, Juliana Nicholson, Helen Michetschlager, Hans Johannsson

— with Glen Collins.

Wow .. amazing to see that photo again .... days of having hair and no stress about the varnish being dry in time!!

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Brian, and would that class be this :)

Standing from left to right:

Maurice Bouette, Joe Thrift, John Dilworth, James Rawes,Patrick Webster, Malcolm Siddal,

Koen Padding, Anne Houssay, Loise Round, Dave "Paganini", Julie Reed, Roger Hargrave,

Paul Weiss, Andrew Fairfax, Ron Thewlis, Brian Stone, Patrick Jowett, Gordon Stevenson, Bill, Glen Collins.

Sitting from left to right:

Brian Lisus, Lionel, Mervin Frost, John Johnston, Juliana Nicholson, Helen Michetschlager, Hans Johannsson

— with Glen Collins.

Are (were) you with MI5?

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Brian, Thank you for your responce...I just tried a sample piece. fun . I used plaster of paris for the dry rub just befor the pencil. I take it the marienglas ( a gypsum)is used so that a toothed surface will be presented to the pencil.primarily and then the marienglas becomes part of a clear filler with top cotes.Is this correct?

My next question is, What, If you don't mind sharing, is the sauce you used on the inside...after gluing the label?

Hi James,

You dont really need a toothed surface for the charcoal pencil to stick .. in fact you could even do it on top of a varnish layer as long as you gave it a light sand with roughish micro mesh to matt the surface. The filler or Marienglass is rubbed into the wood and fills the pours ...you can even mix it with water and rub it on too. The dry method seems to work better for me and then you dust it off and will be left with a very thin white glaze, but not a layer. I then rub my ground (varnish) into the wood with my finger and the glaze goes away. It is bit like taking powdered glass and adding water where the glass becomes transparent.

As to the source on the inside. It is a mixture of fresh uncooked Strasbourg turpentine and sun thickened linseed oil. Three parts baslam to one part oil with two percent drier added. Dont let if form a film or layer but burnish it off with a dry lint free cloth.

Firstly however I make a mixture of 2.5 grams alum and 2.5 grams gelatine, each mixed in 25 ml water and heated . Once dissolved I mix the two solutions together and brush it on the inside of the front only, and then wipe the excess off with a paper towel. Then you will see the plate 'warp' and immediately I clamp it to the ribs overnight. ( Not glued) This is to counteract the tension created by the future outside coats of primer. Then after this I go ahead with the source inside but this time on the maple as well.

I dont say this is the best thing to do .... but it seems to work for me. I cannot offer any scientific reasons as to anything I do and most of my ideas are just based on gut feelings.

All the best,

Brian

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am i forgive? is it safe to surface? edi

post-98-0-21729900-1343245706_thumb.jpg

edi,

You hear talk of the mythical bullet proof varnish. But, if you're using your fiddle for protection from incoming fire, you got it perfected.

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edi,

You hear talk of the mythical bullet proof varnish. But, if you're using your fiddle for protection from incoming fire, you got it perfected.

Better than that - the fiddle belongs to another classmate!

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