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Jeffrey Holmes

What's on your bench? (mk5)

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Thanks Ben amd Mike. I can't quite remember the proportions, but its just oil and rosin, with some madder and black, put on thick.

I find I have to adjust my varnish colour, thickness etc. for every one. I always feel like a beginner with every new pot of varnish; I have to learn how to use it.

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Taking a break from my current violin project and started a treble viola da gamba this week. The inlaid interlace patter has over 40 separate pieces -- some smaller than 1 cm. Not absolutely perfect in may spots but good enough for the first time around. The detail is double life size.

Chris

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Here is one I will ship out this next week. The back, side and neck are Bubinga. The top is Red Spruce. If you are wondering what the wire is for, it goes to the carpenter jack that I will attach later. I don't like the jacks in my photos.

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Here is one I will ship out this next week. The back, side and neck are Bubinga. The top is Red Spruce. If you are wondering what the wire is for, it goes to the carpenter jack that I will attach later. I don't like the jacks in my photos.

Barry,

Looks great...bubinga is a challenge to scrape...so I appreciate the edgework.

on we go,

Joe

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Bubinga is really hard to work with but players like it.

I like how you brought out the 'flame' of the bubinga.

I have heard that some makers have used bubinga for fingerboards. I am curious to know how thin you would graduate the bubinga back given its high density. Do you go by weight? ... tap tones or flex ..etc? I am currently working with some flamed pearwood that is around 0.72 gm/cc with a weight of 130 gm with a center of 4mm and upper lower bouts of 2mm.

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I know many of the folks here really like information that is very specific but I start with the center being 3.5 and taper out to about 2.8. This is the starting place and I tap and flex for the final. I don't tap for a particular note...just till the note I'm getting is clear. when the flex feels???? right to me then I stop.

Sorry I can't give exact numbers, I would if I had the magic formula.

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The back I'm happy with.

The ribs and scroll are back to ground level, stripped and re-grounded for the 5th (?) time. Something like that; I lost count. I had to be really careful not to mess up the back or top during all that.

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Nice Don, you're getting really good, really quick. I'm feeling the love <_<

I see the madman passion, build many, some will be great

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post-25192-0-27173700-1343173460_thumb.jpg

The back I'm happy with.

The ribs and scroll are back to ground level, stripped and re-grounded for the 5th (?) time. Something like that; I lost count. I had to be really careful not to mess up the back or top during all that.

Can be really frustrating sometimes. Every time you get a bit down over not turning out the way you envisioned, just remember Roger Hargrave's post. If he strips and re-varnishs, I guess I don't mind doing it. Nice looking back, good color and shading.

Berl

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post-25192-0-27173700-1343173460_thumb.jpg

The back I'm happy with.

The ribs and scroll are back to ground level, stripped and re-grounded for the 5th (?) time. Something like that; I lost count. I had to be really careful not to mess up the back or top during all that.

Don,

Nicely done. I am looking forward to seeing it in person....VSA yes?

on we go,

Joe

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...build many, some will be great

"all" ... that's the goal, anyway.

... just remember Roger Hargrave's post. If he strips and re-varnishs, I guess I don't mind doing it.

It's not so bad, really, after getting over the mental block against backward steps. This last time I stripped the ribs and scroll, put on 2 coats of ground and 1 coat of varnish in one day, without too much effort.

....VSA yes?

Yep.

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Just working on the ground, ready to start the colour coats. Everything seems to go well until the varnish jar comes out :lol:

Would be good to have some nice warm weather to help dry it, however this is England - we don't do summers...

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Wow...really nice! Will you be using commercial varnish or homemade?

I made a batch of varnish a while back, it was a difficult birth, I managed to destroy my old hotplate in the process.

Used it on my last few violins, and luckily it seems there is just enough left over now to varnish this cello

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Looks lovely Dave. We had a fantastic summer here on Sunday afternoon.

A whole afternoon??:o I hope you made the most of it and had an icecream. Watch out for wasps, they go for the flake!

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The ribs and scroll are back to ground level, stripped and re-grounded for the 5th (?) time. Something like that; I lost count.

Everything seems to go well until the varnish jar comes out :lol:

...this is England - we don't do summers...

I'd be laughing more if it wasn't so true (now at N+1 iteration of the rib/scroll battle)... but at least this time it appears to be passable.

This is Southern California... we don't do anything other than summers. B)

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I made this 16.5" viola a while ago, the back is aspen (a poplar). Originally it was varnished a pale brown color. After looking at it long enough I decided that I'd be happier with it if it were darker, so I stripped it and started over. I mixed up some varnish that was the color that I wanted and then applied it in two heavily tinted layers to the ribs and scroll and got the color that I was wanting. Then I diluted this varnish to make it easier to apply to the top and back without getting a ton of brushmarks. Unfortunately the thinned version of the varnish was more red and less brown than I was wanting. Oh well, it's still a much nicer color than before. Tonight I will clean the polishing compound out of the f-holes and put strings back on it.

Also, I broke the display on my digital camera when I was traveling so I can't see what I'm aiming my camera at, if it is in focus, or if light is reflecting badly off of something.

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"Hey Yogi (Berra). Let's go to Joe's bar and grill." "Oh, nobody goes there anymore. It got too poplar."

Sorry guys and gals. I don't get out much.

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