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Jeffrey Holmes

What's on your bench? (mk5)

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First..congratulations to Christion Bayon for his violin that was the last post in the now closed 'what's on your bench Mk4'thread!

Second just some work in progress...Two pics from my bench of a Goffriller viola copy

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Ben, Melvin, Christian:

it is such a treat to see and hear the work you produce. I'm not a violinist, but I do have an attachment to things old, beautiful and functional. I would love to own a '65 Porsche, but (so far) have been unwilling to part with $50k for a really nice one. Every time i am tempted, I remind myself that they are comfortable to drive maybe two days per year, one in May and one in October. For that same $50k, i could drive a really nice BMW or Lexus and have air conditioning, great handling, smooth ride and quiet every day of the year. I wonder why it should be different for a young violinist. There is certainly nothing that my eyes and ears can discern that places the utility of a Strad or del Gesu above what you gentlemen produce. Simply stunning work. Thanks for posting this for all to appreciate........

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Here's a shot of three back plates that came off the CNC last week.

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The plate to the right has had its hold-down tabs ("ears") removed. All three have their "centering pins" glued in. The order of work is: remove the tabs (but NOT the button marked with "SAVE" :) ); make corner mitres and install purfling; scrape down and smooth the external surface; and, begin finishing the edges. BUT before completely finishing the edges I flip the plate over to work on the interior.

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This is the roughed out interior. On the block surfaces there still is hide glue from plate gluing. The peripheral edge land is reduced before finishing the edges. Also, I scrape down the roughed graduation to my design and desired plate weight.

One of these plates will wind up in my VSA instrument.

Stay Tuned.

Mike

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Here's a shot of three back plates that came off the CNC last we

The plate to the right has had its hold-down tabs ("ears") removed. All three have their "centering pins" glued in. The order of work is: remove the tabs (but NOT the button marked with "SAVE" :) ); make corner mitres and install purfling; scrape down and smooth the external surface; and, begin finishing the edges. BUT before completely finishing the edges I flip the plate over to work on the interi

This is the roughed out interior. On the block surfaces there still is hide glue from plate gluing. The peripheral edge land is reduced before finishing the edges. Also, I scrape down the roughed graduation to my design and desired plate weight.

One of these plates will wind up in my VSA instrument.

Stay Tuned.

Mike

that's really impressive, Mike!

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The plate to the right has had its hold-down tabs ("ears") removed.

I see you had the presence of mind to leave on the hold-down tab at the top center.

Looks very nice. When my wrists give out, I might send you some wood.

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I see you had the presence of mind to leave on the hold-down tab at the top center.

Looks very nice. When my wrists give out, I might send you some wood.

Hi Don,

What you see is an enormous evolution of a HELLUVA lot screw-ups. (These are probably my ~30th back plates, excluding top plates.)

I know some makers think that CNC'ing is not "kosher" making. I say that the CNC is just another machine. CNC'ing forces me to THINK and PLAN before I cut any wood. Still I make mistakes :blink: , but much less so as time goes.

Keep in mind that a crappy design comes out crappy but much faster. :lol::D

See you in Cleveland.

Mike

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Thank you Ben...I use the rubber bands to get things aligned and then cinch them down tight with plastic wire ties...first time using them and I like it...very quick compared to string.

Good alternative use of cable ties! :)

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#5...gluing in red maple ribs on Cannone mold

Seems like a really smart idea with the cable ties! I have used bicycle tubes wich works well but ill absolutly try your method. Hope you let us see the progress of your Cannone!

/Lars

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Here's a shot of three back plates that came off the CNC last week.

post-6615-0-39045200-1342393385_thumb.jpg

The plate to the right has had its hold-down tabs ("ears") removed. All three have their "centering pins" glued in. The order of work is: remove the tabs (but NOT the button marked with "SAVE" :) ); make corner mitres and install purfling; scrape down and smooth the external surface; and, begin finishing the edges. BUT before completely finishing the edges I flip the plate over to work on the interior.

post-6615-0-21797600-1342393408_thumb.jpg

This is the roughed out interior. On the block surfaces there still is hide glue from plate gluing. The peripheral edge land is reduced before finishing the edges. Also, I scrape down the roughed graduation to my design and desired plate weight.

One of these plates will wind up in my VSA instrument.

Stay Tuned.

Mike

I find this workflow fascinating Michael -- very effective, especially if ones design objective is arching consistency form instrument to instrument. I attended the auction of Joseph Kun's workshop materials a number of years ago. On display was his router system for roughing out the arching of his instruments. If memory serves, it was similar to what you were doing but not as advanced. I don't think his system could map out purfling or f hole placement for example.

cool stuff

Chris

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