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Florida Fiddler

Value of this violin

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I purchased this old antique violin about ten years ago from a guy whom didn't know a whole lot about the instrument. I fell in love with the warm tone it had and because it looked different than any other I had ever seen. Notice the unusual curves it has to the sides. I'm hoping that someone can help me learn more about it's history. I've read as much as I can find on the internet but for some reason I have a gut feeling that there's just more to this violin.

The label inside (though I know can be deceiving) reads:

Nicolaus Amati

recit Cremona An;: 1762

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I'd love it if anyone can help me out and shed some light on it. Thanks!

Edited by Florida Fiddler

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What is written on the label is nothing. The fact that you like it means a great deal. Keep it that way.

It has the look of an old charm. The sound is subjective. It is not new that one person likes it but another

person does not. That is why some people pay a fortune (over 100 k) for their violins. Later on

they were not sure its worth.

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I know Jacob dismissed this idea in a previous thread, but I would like to be sure that these violins aren't the result of early experimentation with the Thau milling machine. I've seen quite a few like this (and even more pronounced), where an old model with exaggerated arching has been exaggerated even further to an almost Vorticist extreme. Since these violin seem to tie in date-wise with the development of the Thau, I can't help feeling there's a connection. Either they show off the capabilities of some new technology, or they show that non-industrialized workers were trying to prove just how modern they could be, in an attempt to fend off the collapse of their trade.

This particular model obviously got toned down a bit, by 1920 it had become the classic "Prokop" :D

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I know Jacob dismissed this idea in a previous thread, but I would like to be sure that these violins aren't the result of early experimentation with the Thau milling machine. I've seen quite a few like this (and even more pronounced), where an old model with exaggerated arching has been exaggerated even further to an almost Vorticist extreme. Since these violin seem to tie in date-wise with the development of the Thau

I think it unlikely, usually early machine cut plates were roughed out into very gradual arches, and still required a fair amount of hand work to finish it off. It is possible however, that there are two methods being used, one to shape the arching and then something else like an overhead router to shape the hideous curve around the edge.

Every once in a while you see violins that are just bizarre in the arching concept, which make you think what the hell were they trying to achieve!

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Every once in a while you see violins that are just bizarre in the arching concept, which make you think what the hell were they trying to achieve!

Perhaps they had done a (long since lost for posterity) double-blind test, which proved that they were better than Stradivari! :rolleyes:

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I know Jacob dismissed this idea in a previous thread, but I would like to be sure that these violins aren't the result of early experimentation with the Thau milling machine. I've seen quite a few like this (and even more pronounced), where an old model with exaggerated arching has been exaggerated even further to an almost Vorticist extreme. Since these violin seem to tie in date-wise with the development of the Thau

Please correct me if I’m wrong, Martin, but I think what I dismissed in the previous thread that you mention, was your notion that these archings were pressed, which they can’t be. I “wasn’t there” as they say, so can’t know if they were done with the Thau maschine (or a router, as Dave suggests), or not, but it doesn`t seem improbable to me.

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Actually I think you rather dismissed both - I stood corrected on the first idea (that they might be pressed) but am still intrigued by the second (that they represent some response to new technology) ....

From my point of view, I see a spate of "un-natural" archings in some Schoenbach violins between 1900 and 1920, and I don't think these came about through the normal (and very slow) process of evolution. I'd love to know exactly what was going on ..... use of overhead routers seems the best theory so far.

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Every once in a while you see violins that are just bizarre in the arching concept, which make you think what the hell were they trying to achieve!

One must make allowances for poor Nicolaus Amati's condition when he carved this. Having been dead for 78 years would put off my carving skills, too.

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I purchased this old antique violin about ten years ago from a guy whom didn't know a whole lot about the instrument. I fell in love with the warm tone it had and because it looked different than any other I had ever seen. Notice the unusual curves it has to the sides. I'm hoping that someone can help me learn more about it's history. I've read as much as I can find on the internet but for some reason I have a gut feeling that there's just more to this violin.

The label inside (though I know can be deceiving) reads:

Nicolaus Amati

recit Cremona An;: 1762

I'd love it if anyone can help me out and shed some light on it. Thanks!

Could you post some pictures of the long archs (top and back)?

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I think what some of the above are trying to say is: (cue the teenage girl) "Ew".

Actually I remember gravitating to one of these at a violin shop when I was younger for the same reason, because it stood out of the crowd (and probably was in my price range). It can be appealing to some of us who are not regularly exposed to violins. If it plays well for you, who cares.

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Interesting violin that you got about ten years ago. To me, it is clearly Chinese and I know of a number of wholesalers who have a surplus of this model for about $80 to the trade (or at least that's what this model has been offered to me for). 80 bucks includes the violin, a bow, and a foam case. To give you an idea of the markup on these violins check this one out on eBay; http://www.ebay.com/itm/180483757236?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649#ht_2228wt_924

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people are giving chinese way to much credit, your violin is probably 80-90 years old worth, full retail 500-1000usd tops, on ebay it might go for 200-300tops

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people are giving chinese way to much credit, your violin is probably 80-90 years old worth, full retail 500-1000usd tops, on ebay it might go for 200-300tops

++++++++++++++

Are you sure it was made in China?

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Sorry I haven't had time to take the additional pictures that were requested. The appearance wasn't exactly why I purchased it - it was the sound, definitely wasn't the price tag either for that matter. Came with nothing, no bow or case, which I already had anyways. The sound is more of that from a viola to me (and others have said that as well). It's just not the tin-canny sound that comes from some of the ones made in China. I've been playing for over 35 years, so I've played quite a few. I just haven't had the time to research this particular violin (nor the interest for that matter).

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++++++++++++++

Are you sure it was made in China?

I'd say prove that it's not Chinese.

I'd say the Chinese are not given enough credit. :)

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the apparent age of the back of the neck, your chinese copy is much newer looking, your confusing an original for a copy, besides i dont think the chinese were making this model 10 years ago....

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I think you are confusing age and antiquing. And yes, these were being made 10 years ago by the Chinese. There is actually a wholesaler about an hour away from Redlands who made a batch of them based upon my specs.

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