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A Heron-Allen Del Gesu by John Wons


hk1997

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I'd not agree with the first statement.  As for the second; You have expressed opinions, sir, not necessarily valid information... Others here have presented information and opinion supported by documentation... and my reaction to the innuendo presented in your former post was similar to Bruce's.  

 

I've suggested a different approach.  I hope you consider it.

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Bruce, I can appreciate you expressing your opinion of Charles Beare but he's not perfect and neither were the Hill brothers.

I'm far from perfect, but I can say with as much certainty as anyone claiming otherwise, including you, that the formerly dated 1734 fiddle known as the ex-Sainton was NOT made by Joseph Guarneri del Gesu. It was made by Andreas Gisalberti. Period.

Can we see photographs or a Petherick sketch of what you are talking about?

 

Nobody posesses perfection, at the most it is something to strive for.

 

Bruce

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Bruce, I can appreciate you expressing your opinion of Charles Beare but he's not perfect and neither were the Hill brothers.

I'm far from perfect, but I can say with as much certainty as anyone claiming otherwise, including you, that the formerly dated 1734 fiddle known as the ex-Sainton was NOT made by Joseph Guarneri del Gesu. It was made by Andreas Gisalberti. Period.

Hi JoeG,

 

The 1734 dating is from old information from the 1800's. Hills thought it to be circa 1741 but in more recent times shows it's place as slightly later and fits in nicely with the 'Rose, Hennel, Grumiaux, CARIPLO, Ughi' also illustrated in the Hill book and the 'Prince of Orange, Wald, Hoffmann'.

 

Bruce

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Hi Joe Green,

 

The violin on the left, played by Prosper Sainton is a true Bartolomeo Giuseppe Guarneri 'del Gesù'. Andrea Gisalberti never made an instrument like that in his entire life and I see your hypothesis of attribution as wild speculation; to say the least. EDIT: I am forced to use the qualification Bartolomeo Giuseppe Guarneri to differentiate from those purported by others to be the real 'del Gesù'.

 

The violin on the right which you baptised as Alumnus Gisalberti is to my eye and likely to many others here on MN as an instrument in all probability datable to the end of the 1800's or beginning of the 1900's. The varnish is opaque mud and has been rather clumsily shaded to imitate age and wear.

 

I am even more convinced, after your last affirmation, that you have never seen a real Andrea Gisalberti violin nor held one in your hands.

 

Bruce 

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Hi Joe Green,

 

The violin on the left, played by Prosper Sainton is a true Bartolomeo Giuseppe Guarneri 'del Gesù'. Andrea Gisalberti never made an instrument like that in his entire life and I see you hypothesis of attribution as wild speculation; to say the least.

 

The violin on the right which you baptised as Alumnus Gisalberti is to my eye and likely to many others here on MN as an instrument in all probability datable to the end of the 1800's or beginning 1900's. The varnish is opaque mud and rather clumsily shaded to imitate age and wear.

 

I am even more convinced, after your last affirmation, that you have never seen a real Andrea Gisalberti violin.

 

Bruce 

 

[edited for added attachment]

 

 

The above has been re-baptized as 'by' Joseph Guarnerius alumnus Andreas Gisalberti, which is quite interesting.

 

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post-29446-0-68002400-1405263890_thumb.jpg

 

Joe these two above are clearly not right at all. 

 

post-29446-0-13738400-1405263748_thumb.jpg

 

Above, on the left, you've got the same violin (soi disant 1721, which I highly doubt if it is that old) aside another instrument that is so blurred it's not even possible to make a hazarded guess. Alumnus Gisalberti however is wrong, wrong, wrong.

 

post-29446-0-91082600-1405263124_thumb.jpg

 

The violin above looks OK for Gisalberti and, even if you don't, I see it as radically different than the other instruments above. Honker chinrest! Where did you find that?

 

Give it up Joe, it's a lost cause.

 

Bruce

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attachicon.gifandrea-gisalberti-1727.jpg

 

The above has been re-baptized as 'by' Joseph Guarnerius alumnus Andreas Gisalberti, which is quite interesting.

Joe,

 

With all due respect, may I ask WHO re-baptised this instrument? You????

 

For me it's not interesting at all. I find it rather sad. I'll refrain from further comment.

 

Bruce

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  • 9 years later...

I  visited the Wons atelier on several occasions back, I believe, in the sixties.  It was located, as previously pointed out, in a second floor space on State Street in Madison, WI.  This space later became the 'upstairs' of the "Upstairs-Downstairs cafe". 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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14 hours ago, Ron1 said:

I  visited the Wons atelier on several occasions back, I believe, in the sixties.  It was located, as previously pointed out, in a second floor space on State Street in Madison, WI.  This space later became the 'upstairs' of the "Upstairs-Downstairs cafe". 

 

I would have loved to see all the operation in its hayday

 

14 hours ago, Ron1 said:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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