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daddy-o496

Cleaning brushes.

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I use a natural bristle brush and oil varnish. As soon as I'm done varnishing, I swish the brush around in a little jar of laquer thinner, and then dry it with compressed air outside. It takes only a minute to clean up.

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Thank all of you. I tried turp, then mineral spirits and then several washes with soap and water. when dry, it returned to it's old soft self. Thanx again. PALS, Vic.

Olive oil brush soap

A bar of this is expensive..$12...but it lasts forever.

on we go,

joe

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Personally, I use those brushes shown in the pic Carlo posted, and to be honest, I never ever clean my brushes, and have been using some of them for 5 years, keeping in mind these are cheap "chip" brushes.

My brushes, once wet, always stay wet, forever and ever, until the are not usable anymore. All one must do is keep the brush soaking in the appropriate solvent with some appropriate varnish. For example, My spirit brushes stay in a well sealed jar with some alc. and a bit of wax free shellac,as time goes by I will "rotate" that mix, by tossing the old stuff, soaking the brushes in alc, then reintroducing in to the say 50/50 mix, it doesn't have to be a lot just enough to keep the bristle wet, I often store these at an angle so the brush does not take any bend. The same would go for oil varnish, just some turpentine and a little varnish. When it come time to use the brush, simply flick it in the jar, pat it on some scrap wood, bam good to go, when done, simply put it back in the jar, close the lid, next time do the same thing.

There are advantages to this.

1.The small solvent bath will last a long time, even though tossed once in awhile{ may be spread on plywood to evaporate} uses way less "cleaners" that end up in sinks, in the ground, down toilets, thrown in garbage, which usually ends up in the ground...so its environmentally sound practice

2. A conditioned brush is the best brush. A dry brush can have a tendency to introduce air into the varnish as the brush passes over the work, a pre wetted brush will not do this

3.As some of you may be using expensive varnish, it is more cost efficient. A prewetted brush will not need "saturation+" in order to start laying down an effective layer. similar to how a paint roller needs to absorb x amount of paint before it is saturated enough to start distributing the varnish. A prewet brush that has had the majority of the "soak fluid" flicked/cleaned off will not have enough solvent to be adverse, yet minimizes the need for saturation like a dry brush will, this translates to saving precious material.

4. And finally for the lazy, its just easy, you don't need to spend time cleaning and you don't need to expose yourself to cleaners by getting them on your hands or breathing them.

If you really want to get crazy you can set up jars so the have hangars for the brushes so the on the brush brsitles soak in the fluid, but the never touch the bottom so they stay real straight.

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About shedding and natural bristle. This is to be considerd normal, and can be mitagated quite well by doing the "west trick" as shown by Carlo, but really what helps the most is properly preparing your brush before you ever use it.

1.Take the brush to the sink, run it under warm water and pull at it. you wil remove TONS of hairs like this

2. after dry, get a comb with fine bristles and comb it, this removes even more

3 after that, take the vacuum cleaner to it

4. repeat process one more time.

after that, it is very rare for them to leave a hair, after they have been used at bit and one or two fall out, after that never.

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Guest

OK...I've had natural bristle brushes still shedding after a couple years of use...i've recently discovered that this is due mostly because of fast drying varnish...some varnishes have more open time than others...brushing beyond the open time has pulled the hairs right out of the brush...as well as taking chunks out of the prosthetic padding foam...so be aware of the open time of the varnish your using...

Today I spoke to our local artists/art store about my problem of cleaning synthetic brushes used for violin varnish...they were perplexed as you can imagine because they are painters and cleaning their brushes is a no brainer...

I told them that I tried every brush cleaning solvent with no luck...my brushes were still sticky after throughly cleaned...soo

I tried this brush soap and it worked...don't know why...but here it is...in case someone else has the same problem cleaning their synthetic brushes.

http://www.dickblick.com/products/the-masters-brush-cleaner-and-preserver/

-Ernie

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Hi

I am usings oil varnish and clean the brushes with turpentine and then water with hand soap.

Allways clean in the same way: first the solvent and then water and soap (3 or 4 times soaping and rinsing)It works for spirit and other paints.

Regards

Tango

My father was an artist and this is exactly how he cleaned his brushes. It is also how I clean mine. Just two comments: I always save the turpentine substitute in a jar. It settles and you can use it over and over again for the initial cleaning. This saves turps and the environment. After cleaning my father also re-shaped the brushes using a little soft soap. It sets and holds the brush in shape. This is very good for retouch brushes. BUT you do need to wash the soap out before use. This is not a problem because after using the water, dab the brush with a tissue and then wash it quickly in pure alcohol. This removes the remaining water and you can use the brush right away.

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My father was an artist and this is exactly how he cleaned his brushes. It is also how I clean mine. Just two comments: I always save the turpentine substitute in a jar. It settles and you can use it over and over again for the initial cleaning. This saves turps and the environment. After cleaning my father also re-shaped the brushes using a little soft soap. It sets and holds the brush in shape. This is very good for retouch brushes. BUT you do need to wash the soap out before use. This is not a problem because after using the water, dab the brush with a tissue and then wash it quickly in pure alcohol. This removes the remaining water and you can use the brush right away.

I am glad to reed you Roger

I am working alone so, I apreciate profesional comment and make me glad to know that I go in a right way.

Thanks

Tango

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