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Urban Luthier

New Violin Maker's Plane from Lie Nielsen

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For those of you who find a small block plane useful, you might be interested in looking at Lie Nie Nielsen take on Stanley 101. They are marketing it as a violin maker's plane. At first blush the thumb screw adjustment looks very handy. I can't tell if it is a bevel up or bevel down plane but I suspect it is the former.

In my (albeit limited) experience I've found the Lie Nielsen A2 blades to keep their edge for a very long time -- subjectively longer than the A2 blades on my Lee valley planes.

Wonder if Lie Nielsen consults with industry professionals when they develop products.

Chris

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At first blush the thumb screw adjustment looks very handy. I can't tell if it is a bevel up or bevel down plane but I suspect it is the former.

In my (albeit limited) experience I've found the Lie Nielsen A2 blades to keep their edge for a very long time -- subjectively longer than the A2 blades on my Lee valley planes.

Chris

With a blade "bedded at 18 degrees" it would be a bevel-up plane.

Assuming a 25 degree bevel on the blade, this gives an overal angle of 43 degrees.

Lie-Nielsen cryo their A2 blades, while Lee Valley found that it was not a game changer with their A2 blades.

I wonder if Lie-Nielsen did something when treating their blades, that Lee Valley didn't?

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doesn't seem like a very useful "violinmaker's" plane. Their regular sized block plane which looks the same is great. I was hoping for some finger planes-Oded

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doesn't seem like a very useful "violinmaker's" plane. Their regular sized block plane which looks the same is great. I was hoping for some finger planes-Oded

I agree about the usefulness of the new plane, although Lie-Nielsen's stuff is always a joy to use. I have been waiting for someone to make a small scrub plane with a double-radius sole for hogging out the insides of the large instruments. I have the largest Ibex plane that I slightly modified for this purpose. It's almost a fast as using a gouge, far less wearing on my shoulders, and much less likely to slip and cause damage. Unfortunately, I find that the radius is not small enough in the fore-aft dimension. A small scrubber would be an interesting project in that it would fall in the area where it could be a large one-handed plane or a small two-handed plane. I would like to try one of the latter since it might be possible to use the plane on the pull stroke. My chiro tells me that working muscle groups in alternation is an excellent way for me to use less of her services.

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About two years ago, I was checking out the Solomon archtop guitar site, and noticed that he had designed an archtop guitar carving plane, based on the ones John D'Angelico used, and he announced on his site that Lie Nielsen was going to be making them. I contacted him, and he was unable to give a date when they were going to be produced. So, I contacted Lie Nielsen directly. They said that they didn't know when or if they would ever start producing these planes. Solomon's web site has no new information. It would be great if they did produce these, as nobody makes a small plane like this with a palm knob anymore that actually works. I remember a number of years back that all the luthier catalogs had them, in various sizes. For some reason, they disappeared. Wish I could give you all more encouraging news regarding this project.

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Something like this? It's the D'Angelico plane from Luthier's Mercantile International. I've got the large one, and it is very useful, one of my most used planes for both rough arching and hollowing:

www.lmii.com/CartTwo/thirdproducts.asp?CategoryName=Planes&NameProdHeader=D%27Angelico+Plane

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I think it will be like the LMI one, but it will look more like the violin makers plane. For some reason, I am picturing it with a nice big, fat, cherry palm knob on the end. That would be the ticket. Right now, I am using a nice custom made cocobolo and ipe carving plane that I had made by Knight Toolworks, before he switched over into just making plane kits. It works great, but it is a bit big, and gets hard to hold after a while.

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I also added this ebony knob onto an Ibex plane-works very well, greatly extends the amount of time I can comfortably use the tool  Made it from a cello peg head. Oded

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Hi,

I got two Stanley no. 70 box scraper planes on Ebay, one for $25 and the other for £7!

They have a slightly curved sole, about 3in. square, and pivot on a 13in. wooden handle. They can be pushed or pulled.

I use one to scoop out the backs and fronts of cellos, after the gouge, and although it's a bit flat for the deepest curves, it's great for the lungs. I intend to 'resole' my other one when I get time, and to give it a bit more curve.

Hope his isn't 'old hat'

Conor

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For those of you who find a small block plane useful, you might be interested in looking at Lie Nie Nielsen take on Stanley 101. They are marketing it as a violin maker's plane. At first blush the thumb screw adjustment looks very handy. I can't tell if it is a bevel up or bevel down plane but I suspect it is the former.

In my (albeit limited) experience I've found the Lie Nielsen A2 blades to keep their edge for a very long time -- subjectively longer than the A2 blades on my Lee valley planes.

Wonder if Lie Nielsen consults with industry professionals when they develop products.

Chris

Yes ! Best plane ever /18degree/!!!! I am used 100 and 100 times for bass fingerboard .

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Lie-Nielsen cryo their A2 blades, while Lee Valley found that it was not a game changer with their A2 blades.

I wonder if Lie-Nielsen did something when treating their blades, that Lee Valley didn't?

I read an article about it a while ago.. I can't remember exactly but I think the steel goes down in temperature, stays there for a while (3 days?) comes back up slowly and I'm not sure if it goes down again. The process sounded a bit like tempering in the opposite direction.

I thought the 60 1/2 was the violin makers plane! Lie-Nielsen's current attempt at a violin makers plane looks like it would be handy for modellers, though I'm not in a hurry to buy it. If they made a convex soled rabbet plane I would definitely pay attention! (or even better, a plane that has an adjustable curvature - change it to match the body!)

Nice mod Oded!

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For those of you who find a small block plane useful, you might be interested in looking at Lie Nie Nielsen take on Stanley 101. They are marketing it as a violin maker's plane. At first blush the thumb screw adjustment looks very handy. I can't tell if it is a bevel up or bevel down plane but I suspect it is the former.

In my (albeit limited) experience I've found the Lie Nielsen A2 blades to keep their edge for a very long time -- subjectively longer than the A2 blades on my Lee valley planes.

Wonder if Lie Nielsen consults with industry professionals when they develop products.

Chris

Dear Urban, I think it is a copy of the Stanley 100 1/2. Originals are very expensive on ebay.

I have made a couple of copies from wood, but they wear too rapidly. I am going to look into those planes from LMI since there is a need for this type of plane. If you can find something that is approximately correct, you can make the final adjustment using the power sander. That is what I have done to most of my Ibex planes--but you have to be brave.

Mike D

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I also added this ebony knob onto an Ibex plane-works very well, greatly extends the amount of time I can comfortably use the tool  Made it from a cello peg head. Oded

What does this extension do or do I miss something? In other words: what is the function?

Frits

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