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where was this made please ?


ian777

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In Schönbach

Say no more ....

or maybe just worth pointing out to Ebay addicts and bargain hunters that it's almost inconcieveable that a good violin would have a cheap stained fingerboard. Or at least, I've never seen that grade of fingerboard on anything other than basic trade violins. You don't even find them on Mirecourt violins - Mirecourt did have a cheap as chips non-ebony fingerboard, but it was stained all the way through, maybe dipped for a period in some solution or other. I'd be interested to know what the process was.

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Interesting that it has a bare gut d string though. Could be the original strings! I'd never have thought a violin from that era would have a bare gut d. (bare gut a, maybe yes)

I agree with you that the strings are probably original. Normal was 3x plain gut and a silver wound G. The same can be found on originaly strung Mittenwald fiddles. This reminds me of a recent thread on how to string a violin for Mahler, where I said that plain gut was standard back then.

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Jacob (or anyone else, for that matter :P ), How normal is it to find a violin of approx 100-130 years old (or am I assuming too much? nobody actually said that) strung with its original strings? could such setup be interesting for string makers or others researching performance practise, or is this so common or would the strings be of such low quality (the instrument doesn't seem a great masterpiece) that these strings are in fact uninteresting?

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Jacob (or anyone else, for that matter :P ), How normal is it to find a violin of approx 100-130 years old (or am I assuming too much? nobody actually said that) strung with its original strings? could such setup be interesting for string makers or others researching performance practise, or is this so common or would the strings be of such low quality (the instrument doesn't seem a great masterpiece) that these strings are in fact uninteresting?

It isn`t that common, but happens every now and then here. I presume when someone back then bought a new instrument, which after there death got stuck in some cupboard or attic and forgotten. I have never thought of them as valuable or interesting as such, except for the realisation that plain gut strings were standard untill the 20`s or 30`s, cf. the common opinion that "that" was "baroque"

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Jacob,

Where is that exactly? Is it still called Schönbach? It's in Czechoslovakia now, right? I looked it up on Google maps and could find many other Schönbachs but that.

Schönbach was in North Bohemia, more exactly Sudetenland in the district of Eger. The population was “Sudetendeutsch” and were mostly (but not all) expelled in the “ethnic cleansing” after the second word war. Many settled in Mittenwald, which caused friction with the (different) violin making tradition there. An interesting contemporary article in an issue of “Der Spiegel” of the time explains:

http://www.spiegel.de/spiegel/print/d-44437259.html

In 1949 they were (mostly) moved again, this time to Bubenreuth (now a suburb of Erlangen). Schönbach is now called Luby (in Czech) and the district “Eger” is called Cheb.

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Schönbach was in North Bohemia, more exactly Sudetenland in the district of Eger. The population was "Sudetendeutsch" and were mostly (but not all) expelled in the "ethnic cleansing" after the second word war. Many settled in Mittenwald, which caused friction with the (different) violin making tradition there. An interesting contemporary article in an issue of "Der Spiegel" of the time explains:

http://www.spiegel.d...d-44437259.html

In 1949 they were (mostly) moved again, this time to Bubenreuth (now a suburb of Erlangen). Schönbach is now called Luby (in Czech) and the district "Eger" is called Cheb.

Jacob,

Thank you so much! That is very interesting.

Sorry for the 'misspelling' of the Czech Republic. rolleyes.gif

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Did this contribute to making Bubenreuth a large exporter of trade level instruments today?

Yes, more than contribute.

Should you be unable to undestand the Spiegel article, published on 14th. July 1949, which I linked to above (which is in german), a short summary:

In 1947, after the expulsion of the Sudeten Germans from Czechoslovakia (incl. Schönbach) the Bavarian state government settled 210 displaced violin maker families in Mittenwald. The two vm groups were to an extent mis-matched, since the Schönbacher worked twice as fast (and half the price) compared to the Mittenwalder, who were used to haveing 3 sources of income – the violins, agriculture and tourism (wheras the Schönbacher were used to exclusively make violins). From the 3 sources of income the Mittenwalder were undercut on the violins, couldn`t run the tourism anymore, since all beds were occupied and were left with a little agriculture. The Bavarian state government then built a housing estate for the Schönbacher, with at first 30 houses near Erlangen, on a plot of land that had previously consisted of two or three farm houses and subiquently became Bubenreuth.

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