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Birdseye maple on ebay


DREWBAS

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Also, isn't it against the rules of the forum to offer items for sale?

Yes, if the listing is posted by the seller. I haven't matched the seller with the poster, however. Anyone want to find out if the ebay email goes back to the tonewood dealer's? I don't use ebay, so I don't have an ID.

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The ebay seller says hes located in Mannheim,but his telephone number at the bottom of the listing is a Polish dialling code `0048`,the same as the OP location.

For some reason Birdseye is expensive in Germany,often costing more than normal flamed maple.But hardly anyone seems to use it. I have a few backs that have been laying around for years.I did use it once and found it tone wise not much different than standard maple but harder to work with.

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Birdseye sounds terrible.

Back in 1989 I bought a couple of very similar, indeed almost identical planks from the veneer factory, Sokup in Gedersdorf. Mr. Sokup told me (and I have no reason to disbelieve him) that the wood was from Canada. The asking price was 60.000 Austrian Schillings (which works out to 4.360,-- Euros) per CUBIC METER. It sounded like a lot of money, until you work out how many violins fit into a cubic meter. I have made a violin with it and it was quite interesting to work with, since it is rock hard. Cutting a purfeling channel through 7 or 8 knots an inch was also quite a challenge. It turned out to be one of the very best sounding instruments that I have ever made, so to say “Birdseye sounds terrible” is, in my experience, barking nonsense. Birds eye maple has to be cut on the slab, since it would be birds stripe maple otherwise, so one should be aware of the disadvantages of slab cut wood (more shrinkage, more lightly to get cracks). Otherwise somebody who is better at arithmetic than me, might decide that a visit to a veneer factory could be a better deal.

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If the dimensions are exacts, and if you can saw very straight, you could theoretically get 6 back plates from this piece of wood, which mean 100 Euros per plate. It's on the expensive side I believe.

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Well, bring one to a VSA competition and YOU tell me. ;)

I am not trying to be smug about this, but this is what I was told by a major maker, and to a good friend two year later who competed.

Traditional European curly maple rules in competitions. Period.

Of course, if you are making non-tradtitionsl instruments, which we call fiddles, go for it. In fact, I LIKE non-traditional fiddles, but the VSA judges do not.

My limited marketing experience also points to buyers wanting traditional curly maple.

What is your experience?

Stay Tuned.

Mike

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Yes, Birds Eye has been used in French violins too, and has always been extremely popular for aesthetic reasons .... still is.

Everyone says it's hard to use but it seems to often give good tonal results, so worth the blunt plane blades and the sore fingers ....

I've had 4 or 5 birds eye instruments, English, French, and Bohemian - one was a bit dead, the others were terrific - maybe nothing to do with the wood, but it certainly wasn't a drawback.

Fortunately the world is not yet completely run according to VSA prejudices! If it was, would we have to burn these, or give them away to "fiddlers"?

There's birds eye and birds eye - the stuff in the Ebay ad is pretty full on. You can find it in combination with other figure, or just far sparser distribution of knots.

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I am not trying to be smug about this, but .... What is your experience?

I’m sure you are well aware of what my experience is. Trying to invalidate my comment by bringing up my experience is a classic ad hominem. wink.gif

But if you’re trying to point out that the violin world is stuck in a dogmatic rut... I’d say you hit a bird’s eye... um, bullseye. smile.gif

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What would life be without gaffes? biggrin.gif

Granted, most of the b’s-eye is found on not so great German factory instruments. My point was just that b’s eye has been used in Germany for a long time, i.e. it’s “traditional.” Also interesting that makers like Betts used b’s eye.

On the new market, Gliga puts a lot of stock in bird’s eye for "more expensive" instruments. Granted they are low to mid end, but they have a good sound and a good following in the “advanced” crowd. Of course you can also buy a Gliga with a horse and American flag painted on the back... wacko.gif

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Ever heard of a bloke called Jacob Stainer? :mellow:

Erratum

For Germany, should read Germanic Tradition. The "other Austrian Jacob." smile.gif

I hope I'm not going to have to do lines again. unsure.gif

"Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple."

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple.

Jacob Stainer used bird's-eye maple... 500 times

What would life be without gaffes? biggrin.gif

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I have made a violin with it and it was quite interesting to work with, since it is rock hard. Cutting a purfeling channel through 7 or 8 knots an inch was also quite a challenge. It turned out to be one of the very best sounding instruments that I have ever made, so to say “Birdseye sounds terrible” is, in my experience, barking nonsense.

My Boss made a viola from birdseye maple several decades ago, which he still talks about as being his best sounding viola. Considering that he has made somewhere around 70 violas so far, and that at one time most of the viola section in the Halle orchestra were using his violas, it's safe to assume that he knows what sounds good.

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