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Don Noon

What's on your bench? Mk4

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Your choice of wood looks absolutely stunning.

I was working on this last summer when Chet Bishop was finishing his - didn't expect it would take so long.

ww

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Best not to confuse chroma and chromatic, key notes, key tones and ketones. wink.gifbiggrin.gif

BTW a little burnt Sienna over a yellow ground gives a lovely gold. Gold tone, that is, not Au.

CMYK

:rolleyes:

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post-25192-0-10858100-1336430388_thumb.jpg

Just cooked up some terpene resin a la Fulton, cooled on aluminum foil. There's no iron in it, but it sure makes a nice deep red.

Maybe I did it wrong, but there wasn't any violent exothermic reaction, just a tiny bit of bubbling. Anyway, I think it should make a nice looking varnish. It's quite brittle and weak, so I'm a little concerned about toughness... but oil should toughen it up.

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Don, there are a few things that will prevent the exothermic reaction. One is already process turp that has been sitting open to the air. Another is not cooking it hot enough to reach the exothermic reaction. I believe it's 150 degrees C, but I'm not sure of that. Also you can mix steel wool and acidic acid and mix it with the turp and cook it in a water bath for a specified period and it will prevent the reaction (not recommended). I've made this resin several times, it's unpredictable.

Berl

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That certainly is a nice red...both batches of resin that I made came out more yellow than red...Did you add anything special to the mix?...did you use an iron pot?...wanna swap a little resin?

-Ernie

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Don

I've used the Fulton resin two ways...I made oil varnish with it and I've soaked the resin in alcohol to obtain a tincture...both the varnish and tincture will give a nice golden yellow color...but that red resin you just made looks like just the ticket...I'm making a new batch of madder tincture, ala Oded's recipe and I think the addition of the red resin might make a nice addition to the madder tincture...

I've tried mixing my Fulton resin with some madder tincture and it looks OK...I would'nt need too much resin just a little for color...happy to buy some from you if you have some extra.

-Ernie

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That certainly is a nice red...both batches of resin that I made came out more yellow than red...Did you add anything special to the mix?...did you use an iron pot?...wanna swap a little resin?

I used Recochem for starters, added a little japan dryer, an bubbled it for ~3 months. Perhaps the copper tubing I used for the bubbler added something?? The copper turned a bit green, and the finished turp was yellow with a hint of green, before cooking. My hotplate only went to 450F max, so I let it cook there for 1.5 - 2 hours until a cooled drop got very brittle. The pot was aluminum with teflon coating.

I'm not sure what color I'll get out of the varnish... it might be an orange-brown, which only looks red when it's very thick.

Sorry Ernie, not yet; I didn't get much out of this cook (just testing), but I have a couple of more gallons of Recochem that I might slowly bubble down. It ain't quick.

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This is an experiment in both varnish and acoustic. Thinning a thick cannone-DelGesu acustic copy to auer-Strad graduation. The result is not Not exactly auer,but may be an experimentation in extreme thin version of Del Gesu design.

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post-6639-0-87410100-1336470600_thumb.jpg

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This is an experiment in both varnish and acoustic. Thinning a thick cannone-DelGesu acustic copy to auer-Strad graduation. The result is not Not exactly auer,but may be an experimentation in extreme thin version of Del Gesu design.

Superb instrument Selim.

the color on my screen is also remarkable.

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don i thought we warned you about the potential of aluminum vessels to melt and spill flaming varnish all over the place.....

i spent ten days in intensive care because my aluminum pot melted after accidentally catching fire.

if the varnish catches fire you have what looks like a controlled burn till the aluminum melts... then you have a fireball, seriously, dont use aluminum to cook varnish

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Superb instrument Selim.

the color on my screen is also remarkable.

Thanks Robert.

I think ground has some conribution as well.

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someone posted here having a horrible experience with corning ware glass pots breaking a spilling varnish everywhere, are corning ware ceramic that much stronger and less likely to break than glass, if youre going to prepare for the worst case scenario, which you should IMO, you dont want anything that might break or melt if the varnish might catch fire, or if it is dropped.....

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I agree that aluminum pots are not a good idea and I would not use teflon to make varnish either. Teflon can break down because it is not designed for very high temperatures.

Notice that I'm wearing a tall leather glove which covers my forearm. In fact this pot of varnish caught on fire and some hot varnish spilled onto my glove. Had I not been wearing this glove I would have suffered very bad burns on my hand and forearm.

Also notice that I have a fire extinguisher close at hand.

The pot is enameled steel that I bought for about $15. at a camping supply place. It comes with a tight fitting lid which is also handy in case of fire.

I've used Corning ware wich is inert and will withstand the heat but which can shatter if dropped.

Stainless steel would also be a very acceptable vessel.

Making varnish is very dangerous, always err on the side of caution.

Oded

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My normal varnish cooking pot is stainless steel. And I'll never use anything other than an electric hotplate.

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My varnish cooking has not been above 150ºC = 302ºF, for the stuff I've been doing it's been fine, since I have no access to electricity on land I have been barbecuing in desert beaches, lots of care, fire extinguisher, gloves mask, etc. (always 2 persons).. but I'm planning to cook some Marciana next, I've read lots of posts of 200`C type temperatures, I think I can get there with a barbecue, perhaps my dinghy air-foot pump can get me there - does it start to get dangerous at these temperatures or not yet, or (third option) cook the Marciana at 150º?

Thanks

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My varnish cooking has not been above 150ºC = 302ºF, for the stuff I've been doing it's been fine, since I have no access to electricity on land I have been barbecuing in desert beaches, lots of care, fire extinguisher, gloves mask, etc. (always 2 persons).. but I'm planning to cook some Marciana next, I've read lots of posts of 200`C type temperatures, I think I can get there with a barbecue, perhaps my dinghy air-foot pump can get me there - does it start to get dangerous at these temperatures or not yet, or (third option) cook the Marciana at 150º?

Thanks

I made some Marciana varnish on a disposable barbecue (the small one made with an aluminium box filled with charcoal). Once the flame has disappeared you get more than enough time and temperature to cook this kind of varnish. the result seems satisfying.

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