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Don Noon

What's on your bench? Mk4

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Joe, Would I be prying into your secrets by asking how you got those colors? :unsure:

I like this a lot.

Mike

Mike,

No secrets here. Mild suntan. Balsam Ground + Aged Wood Color. The varnish is a mixture of Greek Pitch Brown and Rose.

Final applications have a small amount of cochineal lake and bone black added.

on we go,

Joe

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And i'm sure that Joe curses cat hair just like I do when varnishing... HAHA - Was finishing up a violin scroll from yesterday and cat decided she needed to try and run off with a freshly sharpened gouge. I about had a heart attack thinking I was about to have a nasty vet bill.

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My latest + cat....

on we go,

Joe

Beautiful work, Joe.

I don't know about the cat and varnising though, i believe were she (he) mine' I'd make her an outdoor 'variety' and one who got a long with dogs.

I have seen other work by you, and I must say that I believe that this is my favorite "look" so far - that I can remember. The range (gradation) between dark and light values is "perfect" here, in my opinion, as, in my own recent attempts I always try for a wide range in contrast of value or concentration - within a short distance, which you have done beautifully here.

I get a similar range of red/brown by using a light water coffee stain or wash on bare wood, garnet shellac as a ground/sealer, asphalt in turpentine as both a colorant and thinner in oil varnish, along with transparent tube oil paint glaze (mostly over the oil varnish layer.) Usually after mechanically wearing the oil layer back into an acceptable "wear pattern"...

The antiquing falls into an acceptable modern 'antiquing" range of varnishing, that many people complain about in theory but seem to accept in practice.

(?)

Very often I am able to get a deep color with a very thin varnish layer, even when I finish with a very thin clear oil *over varnish* finish.

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Beautiful work, Joe.

I don't know about the cat and varnising though, i believe were she (he) mine' I'd make her an outdoor 'variety' and one who got a long with dogs.

I have seen other work by you, and I must say that I believe that this is my favorite "look" so far - that I can remember. The range (gradation) between dark and light values is "perfect" here, in my opinion, as, in my own recent attempts I always try for a wide range in contrast of value or concentration - within a short distance, which you have done beautifully here.

I get a similar range of red/brown by using a light water coffee stain or wash on bare wood, garnet shellac as a ground/sealer, asphalt in turpentine as both a colorant and thinner in oil varnish, along with transparent tube oil paint glaze (mostly over the oil varnish layer.) Usually after mechanically wearing the oil layer back into an acceptable "wear pattern"...

The antiquing falls into an acceptable modern 'antiquing" range of varnishing, that many people complain about in theory but seem to accept in practice.

(?)

Very often I am able to get a deep color with a very thin varnish layer, even when I finish with a very thin clear oil *over varnish* finish.

Would you post a picture ? I'm real curious.

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ct,

Thanks. And, I agree that understanding how to use contrast is a major key to getting control of application.

on we go,

Joe

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Joe, Would I be prying into your secrets by asking how you got those colors? :unsure:

I like this a lot.

Mike

Burnt Sienna and a touch of black, for those who are pigment oriented. Probably much muddier looking than that lovely Greek Pitch tho. So nice!

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I thought for once I could shape the 2 faces of each corner blocks before gluing the C bout ribs rather than after, and to precut the mortices. Is there evident reason never to do this?

post-29661-0-74543400-1336082674_thumb.jpg

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I thought for once I could shape the 2 faces of each corner blocks before gluing the C bout ribs rather than after, and to precut the mortices. Is there evident reason never to do this?

The caution is that the outside corner is weak and could deform or chip with out the extra meat.

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The caution is that the outside corner is weak and could deform or chip with out the extra meat.

Not only that, but you'll have to trim off the C-bout rib overhang anyway, so I think you're doing a little extra work when you total it all up.

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Not only that, but you'll have to trim off the C-bout rib overhang anyway, so I think you're doing a little extra work when you total it all up.

uh... yea,forgot that part, I found that the extra meat really supports the cut on the rib.

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Burnt Sienna and a touch of black, for those who are pigment oriented. Probably much muddier looking than that lovely Greek Pitch tho. So nice!

Right, Addie!

The black is KEY.

Anyone catch my double entendre? :lol:

Stay Tuned.

Mike

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Right, Addie!

The black is KEY.

Anyone catch my double entendre? :lol:

Stay Tuned.

Mike

only in a minor way...................

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Colored varnish is on now but there is still polishing and shading to do. The first picture was taken without a flash, the second with.

post-24240-0-17140900-1336099367_thumb.jpg

post-24240-0-83065500-1336099376_thumb.jpg

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I thought for once I could shape the 2 faces of each corner blocks before gluing the C bout ribs rather than after, and to precut the mortices. Is there evident reason never to do this?

Depends whether your following the Cremonese methods. The linings on Cremonese usually via away from the rib to a greater or lesser extent as they go into the block. As in this pic of an Andrea Amati block.

post-3446-0-82933000-1336120682_thumb.jpg

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My project...

The end throw cam vice was fun to build thanks to David for the Idea, It's not a monster ball , but I enjoy using it very much.

Nice cam vice.

What is it all mounted on? Is that an old drill press table?

Thanks for posting.

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Nice cam vice.

What is it all mounted on? Is that an old drill press table?

Thanks for posting.

It's mounted on a rotating positioning clamp,the black handle is a quick cam Vertical shaft,the whole unit was designed to hold robotic equipment of some sort and could swing a piano.The interesting thing is there are no ball bearings just flat plates.A drill press table would be a great idea.

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The most creative neck removal I have come across. They used a band saw.

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OUCH!! more like they shouldn't even come within 10' of a violin if they are willing to go that far out to do that kind of job. that is one thing I don't like. I am all for learning and doing things your self (the popular mechanic kind of guy). but when it comes to something as artful as violins. don't touch it if you don't know what your doing.

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Off my bench and shipping out today to the fine musician who absolutely loves it. 16 and a quarter viola - probably going to tie in some more stradivari f holes instead of some early brescian stuff next one - scroll was my favorite part. Lense on my good camera has jammed so had to use another camera which has quite a bit of parallax- sorry for not having tarisio like photos -

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Right, Addie!

The black is KEY.

Anyone catch my double entendre? :lol:

Stay Tuned.

Mike

Best not to confuse chroma and chromatic, key notes, key tones and ketones. wink.gifbiggrin.gif

BTW a little burnt Sienna over a yellow ground gives a lovely gold. Gold tone, that is, not Au.

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