Favorite recorded violin performance


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Just wondering what the most amazing recorded performance is that you know of?

I've gotta say that Ilya Kaler's version of 'La Campanella' is probably the most sensational, exciting and always-pleasing piece I've heard. You can find it on youtube. It seems he is so underrated, judging by his relatively low-key fame compared to many other greats.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Have to admit I don't do as much listening these days as in the past. The availability of dvd's and youtube uploads provides another whole (visual) dimension to the experience and appreciation of the art. If I picked out something it might be the Oistrakh Shostakovitch Cadenza... (well, for today anyway)

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Excellent taste, Omobono!

The recording that effected my whole violinistic being was the first recording I ever bought: Oistrakh with the Philadelphia playing the Mozart D Maj. and the Mendelssohn. To this day I find it is like magic. It may or may not be the best thing ever, but it's completely intertwined with my tastes, and Oistrakh remains my idol.

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  • 1 month later...

Superb technique. Horrible interpretation. Does he smash the violin at the end ?

Please recommend your fave interpretation then. I've never listened to this piece, and the Rabin's double harmonics were unlike anything I've ever heard. Surreal sounds!

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Please recommend your fave interpretation then. I've never listened to this piece, and the Rabin's double harmonics were unlike anything I've ever heard. Surreal sounds!

Zino Francescatti's early recording ( '32 ? ) is the absolute best Paganini. He was a pupil of his father's who in turn studied with Camilo Sivori, Paganini's pupil. Zino has the best grasp of Paganini's operatic kind of musicality which has a specificity very difficult to capture for a non italian. ( there is another italian violinist in the same vein as Zino but for the life of me I can't remember his name - I'll PM you when I will )

Rabin is a brilliant technician but musically incompetent. Not his fault in the slightest. While superbly accurate he is always loud, colorless and generally unsofisticated.

If what you want is supreme technique then there is only one : Vasha Prihoda. Nobody comes close to Prihoda. "I Palpiti" with Prihoda is on YouTube.

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name='poptart' timestamp='1339371139' post='545755'

I like his Glazunov Concerto the best of everything I have heard him play. Sorry I can't find a link to that.

Thanks for the links. His playing is out of this world! I linked up to this one which I can't get enough of:

He plays with such intensity! I love it!

Rabin is a brilliant technician but musically incompetent. Not his fault in the slightest. While superbly accurate he is always loud, colorless and generally unsofisticated.

If what you want is supreme technique then there is only one : Vasha Prihoda. Nobody comes close to Prihoda. "I Palpiti" with Prihoda is on YouTube.

Hard to believe you can call Rabin colorless. I find his playing to be extremely emotional, especially his tone. He shapes phrases much more subtly than other violinists while playing loud. He is a loud player...his boldness is something I miss when listening to other versions of Paganini's 1st. Unsophisticated? He plays the notes in a fairly straightforward manner in some ways, definitely shapes his phrases more subtly than most violinists.

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Zino Francescatti's early recording ( '32 ? ) is the absolute best Paganini. He was a pupil of his father's who in turn studied with Camilo Sivori, Paganini's pupil. Zino has the best grasp of Paganini's operatic kind of musicality which has a specificity very difficult to capture for a non italian.

Interesting comment in light of the fact that Francescatti was French.

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Interesting comment in light of the fact that Francescatti was French.

Francescatti was born in Marseilles, part of France. BUT that area has gone back and forth between France, Spain and Italy. Historically, the language spoken there was and to some extent still is, Catalan. It's a major port city, with many influences. I must take issue with people from a certain area being able to play the music of their birth country the best. I find the recording of Oistrakh, with Rozhdestvensky conducting, of the Brahms Concerto very convincing. Oistrakh is not really German (Austrian) as Brahms was. Another recording I enjoy is Sitkovetsky playing the Bach solo sonatas and partitas. I really don't see any need to invoke nationalities in interpreting music of certain countries. Much like violins don't really need to be made by Italians in order to sound good. ;-)

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And the name Francescatti is typically of italian origin. Some of his ancestors (maybe even grand father, or father?) were probably born in Italy and emigrated in France early in the 20th century like my grand parents did, because there was more jobs (especially in the mines of the east of France). Francescatti ancestors stopped in Marseilles which is only a stone throw fro Italy indeed. So it's not really a surprise that his father learnt violin with a pupil of a pupil of Paganini.

In any case Z. Francescatti was a great violinist, born at the same time as Heifetz and Milstein, and their equal.

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