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Jalovek's "German and Austrian violinmakers"


BarryD

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Is Joannes Schorn listed in that book. He was a violin maker in the early 1700's first in Innsbruck and the in Salsburgh. He has two sons who also worked in his shop. I have found just a very few photos of his work and would like to find even more if possible.

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Is Joannes Schorn listed in that book. He was a violin maker in the early 1700's first in Innsbruck and the in Salsburgh. He has two sons who also worked in his shop. I have found just a very few photos of his work and would like to find even more if possible.

The book lists Johann Joseph Schorn, Salzburg, 1716-1726, and Johann Paul Schorn, Innsbruck, Salzburg, 1680-1717. They were brothers. There are pictures of three different labels of the latter, but no instrument pictures.

They are both also listed in Henley, and Hamma includes pictures of several instruments by J P Schorn.

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Is Joannes Schorn listed in that book. He was a violin maker in the early 1700's first in Innsbruck and the in Salsburgh. He has two sons who also worked in his shop. I have found just a very few photos of his work and would like to find even more if possible.

There are large photographs in color of a Johann Schorn violin c.1700 with a pearwood lion's head in the book Alte Geigen und Bogen orignally published in German and English in Cologne, 1997 ISBN 3-00-001441-1 It is listed as having spruce inner blocks and walnut linings.

Bruce

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The most up-to-date reference work for Schön is “Salzburger Geigen und Lauten des Barock” by Kut Birsak, (in German) which doubled as the catalogue of an exhibition at the Salzburg Barockmuseum from April until June 2001. The Innsbruck Schön is a red herring and Jalovec a dreadful book to use for “research”, since it consists entirely of sloppily plagiarised and unacknowledged translations from earlier publications (mostly Lütgendorff).

Schön worked in Salzburg until his death, after which his widow married the vm. Andreas Ferdinand Mayr in 1719, which was then the usual system for continuing a business. Schön appeared to have worked with the composer, Bieber, and is probably best know for Viola d’amores etc.

There is also a violin exhibited in Florenz in the Palazzo Vecchio (who also have an A. F. Mayr) and depicted in their catalogue.

Schön was also one of the names used on the 19th. C. facimile labels provided by the Markneukirchen wholesalers and this spurious label is to be found in all sorts and shapes of violin. A fairly nice Saxon violin, early 19th C. Has been advertised on Ebay for years, for instance, should that be the focus of you’re “research”.

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A bit off topic:

Someone very knowledgeable about violins once stated that Karel Jalovec was a woman. Can anybody confirm that? I believe the first name "Karel" is a man's name in Czech.

Second question:

What's the general opinion of Jalovec's book on Bohemian violin makers? Might that be Jalovec's most accurate book, with first hand information?

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A bit off topic:

Second question:

What's the general opinion of Jalovec's book on Bohemian violin makers? Might that be Jalovec's most accurate book, with first hand information?

I can't answer the 1st question, I just don't know. The second question: Yes the Böhmische Book is much more helpful, but has been superceded by Pilars book about 25 years ago

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Someone very knowledgeable about violins, who helped out for a long time with the journal at the VSA, once stated that Karel Jalovec was a woman. Can anybody confirm that? I believe the first name "Karel" is a man's name in Czech.

Whether a woman wrote the Jalovec books credited to Karel J. I've no slightest idea, but the name Karel is indeed given to boys rather than girls. It's the analog of Karol in Polish, Karl in German, Károly in Hungarian, Charles in English.

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Is Joannes Schorn listed in that book. He was a violin maker in the early 1700's first in Innsbruck and the in Salsburgh. He has two sons who also worked in his shop. I have found just a very few photos of his work and would like to find even more if possible.

At the exhibition held for Jacob Stainer at the Schloss Ambras, Innsbruck, Austria, in 2003 the same Johann Schorn (see post #5) and a violin by Andreas Ferdinand Mayr (1726) were displayed (ISBN 3-85497-060-9). In the catalogue they only have the front views of the instruments. On the Mayr insrument the blocks are spruce and the linings are maple. The dates they give for the Schorn violin in the catalogue are 1658-1718.

The book I mentioned in the previous post #5 has front, back and scroll views.

The organiser and the energy behind the Schloss Ambras exhibition was Rudolph Hopfner who is curator at the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. This museum was the source of the instruments for the exhibition.

The Andreas Ferdinand Mayr mentioned by Jacob is currently in the Accademia in Florence after a move some years ago. The musical instruments are in an adjacent room to Michelangelo's David.

Bruce

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