Sign in to follow this  
Melvin Goldsmith

After Ruggeri

Recommended Posts

Ken_N   

I really like the gouge marks left on the scroll. Highly flamed ribs and a plain back. Just the oposite of what I would think to see. Now we have to wonder, are those plane marks you left on the plates clues as to tuning from the outside? Looks old as the hills. Cool.

Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

questions:

no neck graft?

scroll pegbox seem a different, lighter color?

Oded

Hi Oded

This cello is for a talented teen who needs a better instrument asap. To do a faster delivery I avoided a scroll graft in this case. The poplar absorbed the ground in a different way to the maple and they do look different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nertz   

I had the pleasure of seeing this cello on Saturday evening, its even better in real life then the photos can convey….as ever Melvin, wonderful work.

neil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jezzupe   

Truly master level work! You really captured the "essence" with the texture and antiquing. And thank you for making a separate thread, I would not want to have missed this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Melvin,

That's a mighty nice looking cello. So hard to pull off a good brown.

I notice you have a long afterlength. Do often opt for longer afterlength on cellos or is this based on this cellos tonal behavior?

Great job!

Kelvin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Melvin,

That's a mighty nice looking cello. So hard to pull off a good brown.

I notice you have a long afterlength. Do often opt for longer afterlength on cellos or is this based on this cellos tonal behavior?

Great job!

Kelvin

Hi Kelvin,

Thanks for your compliment. It's a good question you ask re the afterlength.

There was nothing much deliberate here. I do experiment a lot with afterlength and gut length/spacing etc on celli. Because of that I have a drawer full of tailpieces with guts attached ready to go. This was simply the first one I grabbed from the drawer to start fitting the bridge using some old strings...It all seemed to work OK especially once new strings were fitted so I left the TP as it was. If everything is working satisfactorily once I set a new instrument up I like to give it plenty of time to settle into itself before trying to optimise things further...especially with celli... Fortunately the fine player of the original Ruggeri was at hand to confirm things are as hoped playing wise which is very useful for setting the luthier's mind at rest ( especially with one as OCD as me). I have made several 'copies' of this Ruggeri cello now. For a while I have settled on an ideal post, bar and bridge set up which I don't much deviate from. But not come to a conclusion re Tp/TG yet...maybe I got the lucky answer!...Because the player of the original Ruggeri has over 40 experience years with with it I was able to gain useful information from his insights. One of the most useful of these was that one unnamed bridge that was on the cello when he started using it and for many years then on was better than any subsequent bridge thereafter fitted. He had stopped using it when a wing broke off but he Kept it and we found that a replica of it worked best on both the original and the copies!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Melvin,

Thanks for the explanation. I am always trying to find patterns with setup, and cello TP position and material seems to offer makers a maddening number of options. I really like your idea of having multiple TP with guts of different length read to go, especially with the Teflon tailcords, which usually leaving me cursing like a sailor after the fifth time of try to uncinch one of the knots. I'm looking forward to the time when more ideas on TP tuning and position are more clearly studied and understood.

Again, it is a beautiful cello...well done.

Kelvin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.