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How Can I Write Down Music On A Piece Of Paper?


Fellow

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Like anything else, it takes practice. There's also software that can do it for you.

I think it's related to the note vs rote learning as well. But if you already read, and can play, it shouldn't be too hard.

Of course, most things have been written down already, which saves a lot of work. Then just Google it. I find this method easiest. biggrin.gif

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Hi All.

I can play a piece of music which is written on a music sheet but I have hard time to write it down if I have heard a music played. Is it normal? Why?

How other people do it? A silly question? Please help me to understand what is involved?

Hi Fellow,

The best way is play the tune on a piano and wright down the notes. It is not easy!

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Please help me to understand what is involved?

First you need to have a rough idea of the time signature and key. After playing/writing the first bar or so you can confirm those. It gets easier after that. But I find that I accidentally "stereotype" some passages, writing and playing them as I perceive, not as they actually are. Those quirks take time to iron out.

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I learn a lot of traditional tunes by ear, since a lot of settings just aren't written down. I learn the tune, then transcribe what I play onto paper so that I'll have something to refresh my memory in a year or so.

You can also use transcription software like "Transcribe!" by Seventh String Software, or "Amazing Slowdowner" to slow a tune down to make transcription easier. "Transcribe!" even has a spectrum analyzer to help in identifying chords, and you can mark out the rhythm as well.

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Hi All.

I can play a piece of music which is written on a music sheet but I have hard time to write it down if I have heard a music played. Is it normal? Why?

How other people do it? A silly question? Please help me to understand what is involved?

If you can already play music from notation, turning heard music into notation is basically running the equation in the other direction.

You were a college math professor, so let's see what you can do with that. :)

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If you can already play music from notation, turning heard music into notation is basically running the equation in the other direction.

You were a college math professor, so let's see what you can do with that. :)

++++++++++

Math problems are more friendly. You can take your time to think. Music is different. Some sound come and go so fast you are not sure what

you have just heard. Sometime I hear something "run"

We can Identify one single note at a time. "Run" is impossible to me. Some are so beautiful but fast . I have no way to catch them.

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I'ts really simple, but unless you are writing stuff for an ensambles or for the fun of it, it's not of much use, writing is an old and limited medium, if one feels like writing details, you get into lots of complications that make it into slow reading.

In my past life I've only did it when hiring string or horn players in ensambles, or else it's much better to just record it so you can remember, or so someone else can learn it. You get all the details....

But to try a simple answer.....

it's practice.....when I was writing lots I did not need an instrument....now-days I surely would....

If you know one note.....and the key....than the following notes are only jumps..so lots of them already eliminated.....just picture it in your head....hear a chord.....it;s only a line or a space jump, or two, or three...or you can think backwards....it's really simple...but to get up to speed needs practice....try composing without an instrument.....it will force you to image it....it's really very easy....but impossible without lots of practice...

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Here is what precisely my problem:

When I listen to David Garreet played on Youtube " Schubert's Serenade"

there were two parts (to me). Part 1 is the "main theme" most people are familiar to it.

part 2, the improvision (run I called it, close to the end ) that is in compliment to part 1,

I wish I could write part 2 down in music notations, so I can practice on it. Part 2, is nicely fitted to part 1.

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Here is what precisely my problem:

When I listen to David Gareett played on Youtube " Schubert's Serenade"

there were two parts (to me). Part 1 is the "main theme" most people are familiar to it.

part 2, the improvision (run I called) that is in compliment to part 1,

I wish I could write part 2 down in music notations, so I can practice on it. Part 2, is nicely fitted to part 1.

Ok...now my vague answer makes no sense at all....hahaha :lol:

Slow it down an octave....it will be easier....or if you have a software with time compression expansion - Isn't there still Pro-Tools free out there?

Can you see his fingers on the video?? that would be the easiest....than go frame by frame....probably using arrows??? (sorry my connection is very slow - 7 miles from the continent....no videos for me....)

Or .... I think Nonado's answer might be THE call....

I am not familiar with transcribing software...but it seems like the way to go...

The other thing is....improvisation is always a pattern.....once you get the feeling for his patterns...you will start transcribing fast....the beginning it's the hardest part.

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There are probably computer programmes that will connect to a printer and recording device to record what you play, supposing what you play is worth recording and printing as sheet music.

If you buy some Greek Pitch varnish form Joe you'll be annointed with the distilled soul of J.F.Handel and so you will thus be able to write perfectly and without mistake in bulls blood the entire works of David Garret, although I prefer Stephane Grapelli any day.

:mellow:

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A lot of folk music and jazz is transmitted by ear. That is, someone plays it, probably with some improvisation, and someone else listens, likes it, and tries to reproduce what was heard. Of course the second player probably doesn't get it exactly the way the first player did it, and so some variation is introduced. That's normal for folk and jazz. In classical music cadenzas used to be improvised by the player, but some famous players, e.g. Kreisler or Joachim, wrote down what they played and then their originally improvised music became the standard that everyone has to play. What Fellow admired in that recording may have been improvised. Rather than playing the exact same notes I would aim for reproducing the style as an improvisation.

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A lot of folk music and jazz is transmitted by ear. That is, someone plays it, probably with some improvisation, and someone else listens, likes it, and tries to reproduce what was heard. Of course the second player probably doesn't get it exactly the way the first player did it, and so some variation is introduced. That's normal for folk and jazz. In classical music cadenzas used to be improvised by the player, but some famous players, e.g. Kreisler or Joachim, wrote down what they played and then their originally improvised music became the standard that everyone has to play. What Fellow admired in that recording may have been improvised. Rather than playing the exact same notes I would aim for reproducing the style as an improvisation.

+++++++++++++

The only way I play is to read. I started learning to play violin from day one, my teacher put a sheet of music in front of me and told me to play one bar at

a time. If I do not see the notes my mind is blank, I cannot play anything.

in short, it is entirely mechanical . Later, My eyes can leave the music for a short time but not for very long. Otherwise, mistakes, wrong notes, wrong phrases, etc will occur.

I think if you play with a group, you have to follow something. right?

I think when Davis Garret played " Schubert's Serenade" and at the end, he added a small part that fitted nicely with the main theme. Perhaps, there is not

a part of the original score. Like "spice" in cooking.

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I started by ear, at an early age.

To train your ears you need to rethink music a bit, it's more difficult as you get older.

Try closing your eyes when you play, or go to a concert. That way your ears will have to work harder.

Charlie Parker couldn't read music, but Vlad Horowitz could learn a piece by memory from the score without touching the keys !

It takes all sorts and most of as are mortal. ;)

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If you buy some Greek Pitch varnish form Joe you'll be annointed with the distilled soul of J.F.Handel and so you will thus be able to write perfectly and without mistake in bulls blood the entire works of David Garret, although I prefer Stephane Grapelli any day.

:mellow:

Cool, I'll try that!!! Do I drink it straight or watered down?:rolleyes:

+++++++++++++

The only way I play is to read. I started learning to play violin from day one, my teacher put a sheet of music in front of me and told me to play one bar at

a time. If I do not see the notes my mind is blank, I cannot play anything.

in short, it is entirely mechanical . Later, My eyes can leave the music for a short time but not for very long. Otherwise, mistakes, wrong notes, wrong phrases, etc will occur.

I think if you play with a group, you have to follow something. right?

Improvising is lots of fun.....repetition of a good motif and tanking that to other places is a good way, it is hardly all from the moment, thing we learn and sort of repeat them.....take the motif you like, learn some of his patterns and let loose, use chemichals such as wine and other to help loosen up if needed....some belly dancers also help.

Ah important, there is no such thing as a wrong note, that is called a cool passage note followed by a very nice hamonious note.

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' Cool, I'll try that!!! Do I drink it straight or watered down? '

Carlo, you first have to make a pilgrimage to Salt Lake city then kiss the feet of the Pope before drinking a very small amount of thinned down varnish from the Holy Virgin's special egg cup.

Then and only then will you be an approved member of Maestronet. :blink:

Does it have to be the feet of the pope? Can it be Eva Green's feet? I don't know if I'm emotionally prepared for the pope's feet....

Is that a long or short oil varnish? I don't drink long oil varnishes anymore.....gives me a hangover...

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+++++++++++++

The only way I play is to read. I started learning to play violin from day one, my teacher put a sheet of music in front of me and told me to play one bar at

a time. If I do not see the notes my mind is blank, I cannot play anything.

in short, it is entirely mechanical . Later, My eyes can leave the music for a short time but not for very long. Otherwise, mistakes, wrong notes, wrong phrases, etc will occur.

I think if you play with a group, you have to follow something. right?

I think when Davis Garret played " Schubert's Serenade" and at the end, he added a small part that fitted nicely with the main theme. Perhaps, there is not

a part of the original score. Like "spice" in cooking.

I can read poorly, but in a jam or performance, there's never any music written down. Also, especially in a jazz or swing jam, tunes are played that I've never even heard before, much less played. Yet, it's possible to figure out the key and the chords, and improvise a break after only one or two choruses. It's all done by ear, but without thinking. I think playing scales and arpeggios, straight and broken, in all sorts of rhythms is key to be able to do that - along with playing along with CDs/

Slowdown or transcription software is a wonderful tool. The two that I mentioned allow a free trial download.

As far as I know there's no software that writes music from a recording. There is software that can transcribe from a MIDI device such as a keyboard, but I haven't used any.

Learning to play by ear is very liberating, and allows you to play your own music, straight from the heart. I seldom play anything exactly the same way twice, except when I am trying to learn someone else's setting of a tune off a recording.

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Fellow,

I have the opposite problem...I learned to 'read' by ear....my eyes freeze when I see it on paper... "runs" are hard, they result in more of a feeling than a solid image of the music ..and feeling are much harder to describe.... I've heard a lot of good suggestions here, Carlo suggested a computer program that has always interested me, that is one that slows the music by increasing the space between the notes,so there is no pitch change only the speed.I know there are units available for a small fee that are portable and plug in to ...whatever. I would suggest listening to your favorite piece, however many times it takes to become encoded in your brain, with your eyes closed,them slowly start playing along with the music.stopping and repeating as many times as necessary along the way. finding the first note first, and building along the way. The best musicians really only use the notations as guides to interpreting the music.and yes some chemicals ...like "*^%#itall"TM can help reduce the angst associated with making mistakes.in moderation of course.It's music after all....

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The only way I play is to read.

I think when Davis Garret played " Schubert's Serenade" and at the end, he added a small part that fitted nicely with the main theme.

For playing or writing by ear, you need a rote brain... you have a note brain, so:

1. Learn to play simple tunes by ear, as a starter, or

2. Go with the skills you already have. Get the score to Serenade, and read and listen for the differences. Like correcting math homework. wink.gif

http://imslp.org/

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As far as I know there's no software that writes music from a recording.

Actually, there are several. I've used this one, when I only had a fragment running in my head, and for identifying background tracks, etc.

http://tunepal.org/tunepal/index.php

Learning to play by ear is very liberating, and allows you to play your own music, straight from the heart.

Yes!

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