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fiddlewallop

wood putty

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Hello,

Is there some type of wood putty, or other concoction, that could be used to fill in missing pieces of wood on an instrument? Perhaps a mixture of hide glue and saw dust. Although, ideally I'd like something that could accept a varnish.

Thanks,

FW

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Hello,

Is there some type of wood putty, or other concoction, that could be used to fill in missing pieces of wood on an instrument? Perhaps a mixture of hide glue and saw dust. Although, ideally I'd like something that could accept a varnish.

Thanks,

FW

fw,

Assuming we are looking for a practical repair material which will take oil or spirit varnish...and not the repair of a significant or precious instrument [ask Jeffery if that is the case!] shellac burn-in sticks should work for you.

on we go,

Joe

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Hello,

Is there some type of wood putty, or other concoction, that could be used to fill in missing pieces of wood on an instrument? Perhaps a mixture of hide glue and saw dust. Although, ideally I'd like something that could accept a varnish.

Thanks,

FW

++++++++++++++++++

Why not use a piece of wood . Glue a piece of wood tocover the area where the wood is missing. Shape the new piece to match.

I have seen many repair work look so fantatic, It shows the repair person's skill. First class. A chance to show off you don't want to miss.

Cut a piece of paper to cover repair area. Then use a pencel to trace the repair area. The pencel mark shows exactly what is needed to cut.

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It's a chunk of wood that got pulled out of an uncarved maple board, that has been cut to the outline of the violin. It's right where the ribs will be glued to the back, so I think maybe I could try fitting a sliver of wood right where the tear out occured. I'll give this a shot and if this doesn't work, I will try either the shellac burn in stick or the wood putty.

Thanks all!

FW

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One simple trick is to leave the edge thickness a bit thick, say 6mm, then when the plate is thicknessed use a sanding board bigger than the plate to flatten the rib gluing surface until it is the correct thickness.

Clamp the sanding board to the bench and slide the plate over it keeping it flat at all times with equal pressure around the edges. The gluing surface will then be perfect.

The sanding board was what they used at Newark.

To make one I used some 43mm laminate faced chipboard left over from installing a new kitchen, planed the edges square, and screwed some pine edges to the sides to protect the board. Then I got a large roll of 180 grit sandpaper cut it to lenght and used double side sticky tape to fix it to the baord. You can replace the sand paper or use other gares on the other side of the board. To unclog thr paper you can use a vacuum hoover.

Cheers.

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It's a chunk of wood that got pulled out of an uncarved maple board, that has been cut to the outline of the violin. It's right where the ribs will be glued to the back, so I think maybe I could try fitting a sliver of wood right where the tear out occured. I'll give this a shot and if this doesn't work, I will try either the shellac burn in stick or the wood putty.

Thanks all!

FW

could you take an appropriate size gouge and make one chip out of the area that creates a smooth dish and then create an oversize (thick ) piece and chalk fit it? then hide glue it in,and level off? How large a chip are we looking at?

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...Is there some type of wood putty, or other concoction, that could be used to fill in missing pieces of wood on an instrument?...

In some situations I use natural color DAP wood filler. Since I only do repairs, I use it on old instruments in small areas where retouching and antiquing make it invisible.

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There's also the idea of using a gouge to clean up the tearout, then using the same gouge to cut out a replacement piece to glue in.

Since the fill will be a gluing surface, be careful about what fillers you use. Shellac, for instance, probably isn't a good candidate. Use something with decent structural strength, and that glue will stick to.

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For rather small tear/gouge outs, I use a wood filler called PL. Comes in a four ounce

can.There are several colors to choose from. It is made from real wood, a rather thick

peanut butter like paste, which I thin slightly with carpenter's glue. Let it dry over night

and it sands and takes varnish well.

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