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Testore


fiddlewallop

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This is a Testore copy I'd imagine. The wood is too highly flamed, the label doesn't look genuine, and I think the joint in the spruce top is too fine for his style, but it doesn't have a bad sound:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Very-old-violin-Lab-Teftore-Carlo-Antonio-1741-sounds-old-looks-/280812783409?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4161bf0731

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I'm with Jacob on this one, maybe as old as 1800. Many violins from this time and place end up with Testore labels, I think because of the rustic features. I have a soft spot for them, especially the ones with inked on purfling and very plain wood, I dont know why.

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I'm with Jacob on this one, maybe as old as 1800. Many violins from this time and place end up with Testore labels, I think because of the rustic features. I have a soft spot for them, especially the ones with inked on purfling and very plain wood, I dont know why.

I very much share you're soft spot on these fiddles. A shame that Dörffel/Dörffler (etc.) were such a large family, and almost never labeled, so that one doesn't have a hope in hell of working out which one was which.

Richardz: Sorry, definatly NOT composite (exept of course the label). I would argue with you there until the cows come home

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I very much share you're soft spot on these fiddles. A shame that Dörffel/Dörffler (etc.) were such a large family, and almost never labeled, so that one doesn't have a hope in hell of working out which one was which.

Richardz: Sorry, definatly NOT composite (exept of course the label). I would argue with you there until the cows come home

Jacob: The cows come home here about 5:00pm. I'm curious. How would you explain the all the wear to the top and neck with nothing like it on the back and sides?

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Jacob: The cows come home here about 5:00pm. I'm curious. How would you explain the all the wear to the top and neck with nothing like it on the back and sides?

I see exactly what you mean Richard, it's just that I am very familiar with these fiddles, and that is exactly just what they look like. I can't explain why the belly often looks a little worse for wear than the rest, perhaps it was the wood treatment they chose(?), but who knows.

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I see exactly what you mean Richard, it's just that I am very familiar with these fiddles, and that is exactly just what they look like. I can't explain why the belly often looks a little worse for wear than the rest, perhaps it was the wood treatment they chose(?), but who knows.

So Jacob, can you say if that fiddle had a lot of those marks put on it when it was new? By "wood treatment" do you mean pressing chains and nuts and bolts etc into the wood?

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I don't know if Klingenthal violins of this age used a hide glue size under the varnish ....?

Some violins spend a lot of time sitting out on their backs, not in cases, and the top surface is very exposed. Drops of water left unattended can eat away at some finishes, and then dirt gets in etc ...

You also often see violins where the varnish is very distressed just on one of the rib lengths, because they were kept on one side all the time, sometimes on a piano.

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I'm not sure why you guys think all of the dings on the top would be out of place. Its an old, working, and relatively common instrument, could have been hanging on a bar room wall next to the dart board or left in an open case where kids played etc. Anything. Instruments can get unevenly damaged in all sorts of different ways depending on how they are used and stored. Of course damage can be artificially added to make the instrument look old to fool someone, but it doesnt look like the case here, at least to my eye.

I think it is usually a mistake to consider wear patterns and damage when trying to identify an instrument.

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So Jacob, can you say if that fiddle had a lot of those marks put on it when it was new? By "wood treatment" do you mean pressing chains and nuts and bolts etc into the wood?

I think some of the marks on the belly of this one could be subteranian woodworm tunnels. I think I have already mentioned that I don't really know why the belly often looks a bit more tatty than the back. This effect normaly lessens considerably when the fiddle is thouroughly cleaned. I wouldn't be surprised if they slightly "distressed" these fiddles when they were new, but again, I haven't made my mind up about that - you tell me! :D .

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