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Quality Of A violin


Fellow

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Hi all,

The difference of a fasley labelled violin and truely labelled violin, is their qualities. Is that right? If you buy a violin from a private party

how do you know the label is true? If the quality is good why anyone cares about the label(see price range later) The price is only important. No one wants to pay more than necessary.

So it reurns out to be the question of quality. How can one tell? By sound? But appearance? by the the place you buy it from? what else?

Very confusing for a consumer. Can you help? I am talking about $2,000 USD violins, most popular violins (Ficker, Roman Teller etc) in this price range.

My feeling was that they based on the conditions and the kind of wood they used. eg. moer flames, more money. No scratch or less scratch more money. they all sound pretty much same but

quite acceptable. What else one should be concerned with? If I may ask. Thank you.

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Hi all,

The difference of a fasley labelled violin and truely labelled violin, is their qualities. Is that right? If you buy a violin from a private party

how do you know the label is true? If the quality is good why anyone cares about the label.

True and not true.

The real difference isn't necessarily “quality” in the sense you might be suggesting here

The difference in the example above, is in the provenance only. A falsely labeled violin obviously doesn't have the correct provenance, to match the label, and often provenance has a “specific catalog type” monetary value, because of when, where, and who made the violin -

and the value is not strictly based on how the violin performs, or how it sounds, but the name of the maker, and the condition of the example at hand. “Collector value” must be held separate from any value that is assigned by virtue of another type of value, which is not determined by “the market” as much as it is by some other type of intrinsic value - to a specific buyer, for example, or to an individual or to a musician who likes it regardless of who made it.

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And on the other hand, the correctly labeled violin may well be the "higher quality" violin...

For me, personally, I have to handle and play any violin, before making an assignment of "quality" for myself.

Labels, alone, have never impressed me much

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Thank you. You said it so much better. Me too, I would like to play a violin for a day or two, if I do not want to put it down, then I would say

it is a good violin. Amazingly there are a lot of modern violins are pretty good (to me anyway) and a lot also are not so good. To say a violinis not good

is not a sure thing. Some luthiers may be able to perform magic. I cannot entirely rule it out.

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++++++++++++

Amazingly there are a lot of modern violins are pretty good (to me anyway) and a lot also are not so good. To say a violinis not good

is not a sure thing.

Fellow,

I'm here to tell you that, from firsthand experience, there are also many classical Italian violins that are pretty good, and a lot that are not so good, or that don't "play" so well either.

The only caveat I see here (in general) is that the ones that play well - seem to play really well.

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Fellow,

I'm here to tell you that, from firsthand experience, there are also many classical Italian violins that are pretty good, and a lot that are not so good, or that don't "play" so well either.

The only caveat I see here (in general) is that the ones that play well - seem to play really well.

++++++++++++++

I have no idea of what an Italian violin would sound like in my hands. I never have one. My friend has one about ( $300k) I dare not to play his to

avoid any mishap. Besides my hands become nervious if I hold his. My German made violins Old and modern I have both. They are the best to me so far.

I cannot imagine Italian and German violin would be much different. It is only a few mountains apart to separate these two countries.

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++++++++++++++

I have no idea of what an Italian violin would sound like in my hands. I never have one. My friend has one about ( $300k) I dare not to play his to

avoid any mishap. Besides my hands become nervious if I hold his. My German made violins Old and modern I have both. They are the best to me so far.

I cannot imagine Italian and German violin would be much different. It is only a few mountains apart to separate these two countries.

I understand.

I would suggest that the "Glamour" of an expensive old Italian violin, not stop you from playing one when you get the chance.

You strike me as entirely capable of exercising the necessary care. Perhaps such an act would clear the air a bit regarding what is involved.

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++++++++++++++

I have no idea of what an Italian violin would sound like in my hands. I never have one. My friend has one about ( $300k) I dare not to play his to

avoid any mishap. Besides my hands become nervious if I hold his. My German made violins Old and modern I have both. They are the best to me so far.

I cannot imagine Italian and German violin would be much different. It is only a few mountains apart to separate these two countries.

I would not become too infatutated with Italian instruments, [unless old italian].A luthier aquaintence of mine told me about an associate of his[sam S] who spent a few years working in Cremona and to his chagrin discovered shippments of white vfiolins comming fron China,being finished ,set up and sold as Italian instruments.

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I would not become too infatutated with Italian instruments, [unless old italian].A luthier aquaintence of mine told me about an associate of his[sam S] who spent a few years working in Cremona and to his chagrin discovered shippments of white vfiolins comming fron China,being finished ,set up and sold as Italian instruments.

+++++++++++++

Once in a violin shop of my local area there was an exhibition of Italian violins (for sale, a diffeent way to say it). The better one is about $ 28K

whoch was pretty good, IMO but another one $18K is just like my German which is only $2k. What a big price difference.

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+++++++++++++

Once in a violin shop of my local area there was an exhibition of Italian violins (for sale, a diffeent way to say it). The better one is about $ 28K

whoch was pretty good, IMO but another one $18K is just like my German which is only $2k. What a big price difference.

Yes, absolutely.

And while we are talking about it, with in a certain strata of pricing, and lack of pedigree; (And yes, I do know that this may be construed as an inflamatory remark by some members, but:)

I predict, for a while yet at least, you can expect to see many more examples of very nice Chinese made violins on the market also.

A recent violin I posted about here, in a thread about set up - I later found out, after setting it up and giving it back to the customer, that it cost an amazing $190.00 on the internet.

What was amazing about it, (for me) was that, while it couldn't have been mistaken for a Strad, well set up (with, perhaps two days work, and $300.00 in parts) it would sit well on a shelf of other violins I've seen, sold in the $2,000.00 - 3,000.00 "student" range of "better" instruments.

As far as longevity goes, who knows? I don't, but I suppose that a few years down the road we'll see how well they fair, compaired to the many available German violins from the early - mid 1800's through present day - but it seems like a good (or great, depending) thing, for those of us who play the violin, who work for a living, and pay a mortgage.

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A recent violin I posted about here, in a thread about set up - I later found out, after setting it up and giving it back to the customer, that it cost an amazing $190.00 on the internet.

What was amazing about it, (for me) was that, while it couldn't have been mistaken for a Strad, well set up (with, perhaps two days work, and $300.00 in parts) it would sit well on a shelf of other violins I've seen, sold in the $2,000.00 - 3,000.00 "student" range of "better" instruments.

As far as longevity goes, who knows? I don't, but I suppose that a few years down the road we'll see how well they fair, compaired to the many available German violins from the early - mid 1800's through present day - but it seems like a good (or great, depending) thing, for those of us who play the violin, who work for a living, and pay a mortgage.

Cello's too. Just came back from the NAMM show in Anaheim and man, the cellos looked great this year. Don't sound nearly as good as they looked, but there were some Guad cellos antiqued in blond that were killer looking and can be landed here for a little over a $1K to $1500. I think they will hold up fine. I have been using better Chinese instruments in my shop for a while for the rentals/low end and they have faired very well. jeff

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