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Michael Darnton tribute


strauzart

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And how about threads also in tribute to all the people deep in the trade who post here, like Jeffrey Holmes, Roger Hargrave, Bruce Carlson, Eric Meyer, Jacob Saunders, and a few people out of the Francais shop (some anonymous) who contribute consistently stellar stuff? Their posts may not be voluminous, but they don't need to be, if one is a little tuned in.

Well, that's pretty much the Pantheon I was alluding to... and not tongue-in-cheek, or with extreme irony, as one poster suggested. It was a lofty (but failed) attempt at humility.

And let's not forget Mr. Burgess, since we are naming names. Even if he and Mr. Darnton get into it sometimes... bored.gif

No, I do not believe Maestronet is one of those forums where the "big dawgs" keep everyone in line, and stifle dissent. That would stifle the creativity and brilliant insight that make MN unique.

So we have a poster who slings a bit of filth... there is the occasional pearl as well. Learn to duck, or leave it to our moderator. tinfoilhat.gif

P.S. Darnton Rocks! 18.gif

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I'm actually very grateful to Michael for something that comes from one of his past lives ... as a violin photographer. When I started trying to photograph violins I trawled Maestronet for advice and found plenty of good stuff, and a lot of it was written by him. At one point, when I was about halfway through doing the photos for my book, I had a major panic that my photos weren't up to scratch. I emailed Michael and sent him an image and he reassured me that everything was fine - in fact he explained in great detail all the stuff about focal lengths, sensor size, etc that I needed to understand. Once I'd got the OK from MD I was perfectly happy. So... thanks again Michael.

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I'm actually very grateful to Michael for something that comes from one of his past lives ... as a violin photographer. When I started trying to photograph violins I trawled Maestronet for advice and found plenty of good stuff, and a lot of it was written by him. At one point, when I was about halfway through doing the photos for my book, I had a major panic that my photos weren't up to scratch. I emailed Michael and sent him an image and he reassured me that everything was fine - in fact he explained in great detail all the stuff about focal lengths, sensor size, etc that I needed to understand. Once I'd got the OK from MD I was perfectly happy. So... thanks again Michael.

....

Michael is an artist with a great eye for detail and an amazing capacity to obvserve and share. Studious followers of MN will have Benefited

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Michael is the only person on this forum whose posts can be extracted from the forum and turned into a detailed book on violin making. That's probably why he's being specially thanked and set apart from those people wish to thank for simply enlightening everyone with their presence, regardless of their actual volume of contribution.

Even so, it is a mass display of online suckupery that could make his head explode

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Well, that's pretty much the Pantheon I was alluding to... and not tongue-in-cheek, or with extreme irony, as one poster suggested. It was a lofty (but failed) attempt at humility.

And let's not forget Mr. Burgess, since we are naming names. Even if he and Mr. Darnton get into it sometimes... bored.gif

No, I do not believe Maestronet is one of those forums where the "big dawgs" keep everyone in line, and stifle dissent. That would stifle the creativity and brilliant insight that make MN unique.

So we have a poster who slings a bit of filth... there is the occasional pearl as well. Learn to duck, or leave it to our moderator. tinfoilhat.gif

P.S. Darnton Rocks! 18.gif

+++++++++++++

Good point. A quote for all of us to think.

“Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!”

― Hunter S. Thompson

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Too bad the search doesn't work worth a s**t anymore , so I can find his posts on subjects when I need them.

But there is a way. Go to www.google.com and search for

Darnton site:www.maestronet.com

or

Stradofear site:www.maestronet.com

Another hint: this technique can also be used for other contributors who have posted detailed information on restoration! Great resources all.

Glad to help. :)

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There's always one...eh?

Yes, always, it seems - there is at least one.

Over the years, I have learned a great deal of what I know, that is of of great value to me, from Mr Darntons writing - particularly with regard to varnish and set-up.

What makes the greatest difference, for me, is that there is always an “of great value” part to what this guy has to say.

So, why not a tribute to Michael Darnton? You can count me in.

Hopefully this isn't over into propitiation, as, that's the last thing anyone (including me) here is interested in.

- keep it up Michael, despite all of the very ligimate reasons not to - there are people who would never know much about this stuff, if you hadn't told them of it.

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Yes, always, it seems - there is at least one.

Over the years, I have learned a great deal of what I know, that is of of great value to me, from Mr Darnton' writing - particularly with regard to varnish and set-up.

What makes the greatest difference, for me, is that there is always an “of great value” part to what this guy has to say.

So, why not a tribute to Michael Darnton? You can count me in.

Hopefully this isn't over into propitiation, as, that's the last thing anyone (including me) here is interested in.

- keep it up Michael, despite all of the very ligimate reasons not to - there are people who would never know much about this stuff, if you hadn't told them of it.

+++++++++++++++

There is a possibilty that people mix up with Stradivari ,then it gets you into trouble of untangling it.

Seriously, I am thinking how many makers we have known? Less than a dozen. right?

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Unlike some posters who often shoot first and ask questions later, (like me!), when Mr. Darnton speaks he actually knows what he's talking about. I wish he'd contribute more often, but maybe he has only limited patience to deal with threads like "Fritz blind test." Even I get tired of re-inventing the wheel every so often.

In any event, I hope he makes a handsome living in Chicago. Whatever it is, he's worth more.

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Unlike some posters who often shoot first and ask questions later, (like me!), when Mr. Darnton speaks he actually knows what he's talking about.

Sometimes he does, and sometimes he doesn't.

Take for example the various condemnations of tap tuning. There are quite a number of makers who use some form of this, who perhaps coincidentally, make unusually good sounding instruments.

Sounding authoritative is not the same as being correct.

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OK, please pass the Carmex. Praise for one man, yes, and well deserved. He not only deserves praise for contributing, but for contributing what others would not contribute, that is a no nonsense approach to explaining things that he has learned from old fashioned hands on experience. This is an attitude that is lost to many, even the knowing and experienced. As an example I would like to present the counter attitude of another prominent maker and member who stated once, "Why give enough information so that any accomplished woodworker can produce commissioned instruments?" (not an exact quote, but close). Praise for honestly trying to help others understand without selfish motives (selfish is not always a bad thing) is well deserved by Mr Michael Darnton.

Scott

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Sometimes he does, and sometimes he doesn't.

Take for example the various condemnations of tap tuning. There are quite a number of makers who use some form of this, who perhaps coincidentally, make unusually good sounding instruments.

Sounding authoritative is not the same as being correct.

David, with continued great respect for your own obvious huge talent and skill, I don't think that disagreement with a particular theory (such as the tap tuning you mentioned) implies a lack of authority or correctness. For example, Einstein has been proven wrong here and there but that does not mean he was not a huge authority on Physics.

Moreover, I feel folks are applauding Darnton as a whole - his no-nonsense candor, scholarship, pedagogy, photography, writing and craftsmanship are self-evident, yes; but let us not forget also the attitude of good will and generosity of the man. It has touched many of us, myself included. Please, let's let him have his moment in the sun. :)

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Sometimes he does, and sometimes he doesn't.

Take for example the various condemnations of tap tuning. There are quite a number of makers who use some form of this, who perhaps coincidentally, make unusually good sounding instruments.

Sounding authoritative is not the same as being correct.

On the other hand, first hand observation, first hand experience and/or honest disagreement - isn't condemnation.

Both sides of any issue can disagree, without "condemnation" becoming a central point of the discussion.

(Which, in any case, does not usually include the "makers of note" (including you) that post here, who, on the contrary, seem to have no reason to try to ram their personal untried theories down everyone's throat whenever they post.)

Mostly, in my opinion, the condemnation starts where the experience ends.

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Sometimes he does, and sometimes he doesn't.

Take for example the various condemnations of tap tuning. There are quite a number of makers who use some form of this, who perhaps coincidentally, make unusually good sounding instruments.

Sounding authoritative is not the same as being correct.

umno.gif

OK, I'm definitely not into Carmex® but I willingly give credit where credit is due. Nobody has proven that tap tuning is essential to make a good violin.

Sounding authoritative is not the same as being correct.

I believe you have just proved your own point.

bored.gif

Addie, not an authority on anything boohoo.gif

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