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A twitch of a different tool...


COB3
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Don't know how it could relate to violin-making. A lot of you fellows have such tools. I have never used one-- what all do you do/make with them? I have a little wood-lathe with which I hope to make some pegs, but this is a fairly serious steel-mover, for a home shop. 9" swing, 48" bed.

I do intend to learn to use it, but I am curious what other DIY guys do with such tools.

It has a 4-jaw and a 3-jaw chuck, as well as the other kind of chuck to hold a drill bit in the tailstock. Everything seems to be there, but what do I know? It could be virtually stripped, and I would not know it. The motor, belt, all the flat-belt pulleys, the switch, at least some of the change gears are there, but I 'spect some are missing. The tool slide thing works...nothing is rusted up.

Anyway. Nice toy. Just gotta figure out what to do with it. :)

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You can make shaft bushings, shafts, collars, true up motor commutators / slip rings, turn tapers, machine drums, discs, knurl tool handles, make belt pulleys, etc, etc. You're only limited by your imagination. Once you start using it, you'll see lots more applications in making things for the shop, and maintaining existing machinery. Keep in mind you can also machine plastic, hard wood and other materials aside from metal.

Have a look at how the commercial endpin holders are made, or a piece of tapered plastic for setting up peg shaver blades, or an actual reamer . I have a similar lathe with the quick change gear box, as well as a Summit lathe that has a 22 inch swing, and a 12 foot long bed for bigger projects.

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Happy holidays to you in Oregon,

I have a 13" Southbend that I've had for 25 years. I've worked in manufacturing for almost 45 years and would be lost without my little machine shop at home. The lathe and milling machine get used a lot for wood projects besides metal and plastic tasks. Your little lathe will come in handy for making tools and general maintainence around the house. If you do most or all of your day-to-day house maintainence many times you just can't find that plumbing fitting or an electrical box needs an adapter that you can't find. Out to the shop and with an hour or so and junk materials, your out of your little dilemma. you can make some killer chisel/gouge handles and punches on the lathe.

If you can locate a little Mom-&-Pop machine shop in your vicinity, try to get by loitering around it a bit. Just watch what they're doing and ask a few questions. I know from some of your earlier posts that you have some metallurgical knowledge and if you make and take apart and repair violins you have the basic skills to get going.

I like to make or modify many of the tools that I use and couldn't get by without these mechanical wonders. Consider yourself very lucky as there are many critters out there that would trade their favorite left-hand gouge for that little lathe.It's just the right size for home tinkering.

Steve

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...Nice toy. Just gotta figure out what to do with it...

Yes, a very nice toy. I was given a very nice 1945 South Bend Model A with all kinds of tooling a few years ago. I haven't played with it enough to become terribly skillful with it. You can find anything you need or want for it on Ebay.

For instrument-related work I have used it for making bow buttons, making drill bits for bow work and turning a long wooden taper that I used for installing cello spiral bushings. I'm sure there is a lot more that I could use it for once I learn how.

post-4504-0-35611100-1325080722_thumb.jpg

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Well, that is some helpful feedback! Thanks.

My lathe looks a lot like yours, Brad, just not in as good a condition. I believe mine is a Model C, but I don't know the difference-- I just found a website that let me look up by serial number (74108), and I think mine was made in July or August of 1937, and is a Model C. I can see one difference, by looking at your picture: mine does not have that box on the left, with the gizmos on it. All mine has is a forward and reverse switch made by the Furnas Electric Co.

Yes, I can see where it would have been helpful a few times when I did a job a much harder way. (cello end-pin bushing is a prime example.) I expect I will find some uses for it. :)

I downloaded a South Bend booklet called "how to run a lathe"-- I think all it is is the original user's manual, but it may help. There is a website (http://www.lindsaybks.com) where you can get a number of South Bend books, as well as other "old-tech" books.

Once I get it all put together and cleaned up, I will post some pictures.

Chet

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I believe mine was a model C also. The ways were incredibly worn, and it therefore was not very precise. The thing I really hated was the oil stripes that it would leave on the wall, my shirt, my glasses... from those oil-lubricate cup/cone main bearings.

I ususally use my lathe for making tools for tools... a mandrel for laying up a composite fingerboard sanding form, a mandrel for holding a diamond cutoff wheel to be used on my mill, a plug-cutting tool to cut crossgrain plugs to fill the alignment pin holes in the plates, shaft bushings to repair other machines, that kind of thing. Right now, I'm contemplating making a jig to hold a fingerboard, so I can use the lathe to turn a perfect 42mm radius on the entire length of the fingerboard in one easy step.

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Never having used the machine, this is obviously a shot in the dark, but would it be possible to erect some sheet-metal shields that caught the thrown oil and dribbled it back down to a more acceptable destination?

That Fingerboard trick sounds a lot like an idea I had, but I never came up with a way to get the 1.5mm scoop in the middle section without diminishing the radius. Easy to do, if you are not on a lathe. seems to me it would be problematic ona lathe unless you bent the boards a bit, turned them, and then released the pressure.

The plug-cutter sounds interesting. It occurs to me that I have always wanted one of those f-hole cutting tool sets, but have been too much of a tightwad to spring for them. Maybe I can do that for a start. :)

Thanks again.

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Chet, I've be a lathe man for 35 years and would be happy to help you if you need it. Just pm me. Started on old lathes that were converted from overhead power to electric. The training book the owner gave me (best boss I ever had by the way, thanks Charlie) said the first step was to tuck your tie into your shirt, so make sure you do that! We did our own maintenance, I made a new brass half nut for the feed while I was there. Made ball headed adjusting screws for punch presses with 1 3/4 pitch buttress threads, crankshafts for punch presses, and even cut new threads in worn out pitmans to match the new adjusting screws. All manually. Now I do almost everything on cnc, except for at home where I have a little mini-lathe. A sheet metal guard is a great thing to have to keep some of the chips off the floor, and to keep the wall behind it looking good.The little drip glasses have adjustments on them so that they do indeed drip not gush if working properly. The quality of my mini-lathe isn't all that great, and it is pretty small. You got a great gift. Here's an idea for the f hole cutter. I used brass rod, because I had it, turn the od at the end to the size you want, and drill a 1/8 hole in the middle, and clear the insid out for 5mm or so. I drill a 1/8 hole in the center of the terminal hole, put a 1/8 piece of drill or whatever in, slip the rod over and twist it in. Go from both sides and it will look great.

Ken

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That Fingerboard trick sounds a lot like an idea I had, but I never came up with a way to get the 1.5mm scoop in the middle section without diminishing the radius.

Yipes... 1.5mm scoop? For a violin, or a viola?

I don't think the scooped area should (or even "can") be made trying to keep the radius the sam all the way. My goal would be just to find a way to start with a perfecty straight, even radius, and then add the scoop manually from there. It's the initial straight, even radius part that has been the most annoying task for me. I prefer to start from a known geometry, and then add the anomalies.

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Some of these lathes you can mount the step pulleys and motor below the headstock in the cabinet. My machine is somewhat more recent as it doesn't have the oilers, has the pulleys mounted as I described, and the headstock pulleys have a little flip cover that normally encloses them while in use. It sounds like your machine doesn't have the quick change gearbox, in which case there are various interchangeable gears in a set that can be swapped out for various screw feed speeds. These are primarily used for threading, and determine the thread pitch you can cut.

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I don't think the scooped area should (or even "can") be made trying to keep the radius the sam all the way.

Sure you can. Just envision a stack of poker chips and then push the middle off line a little bit, or bend a piece of conduit slightly (not enough to distort the cross section, and you'll see the geometry of it. I use the same template at nut, middle, and bridge end.

If anybody has a small engine lathe they want to get rid of, I'll be happy to find a home for it. The one we have here at work is positively the worst machine tool I have ever laid hands on. Beyond redemption.

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Sure you can. Just envision a stack of poker chips and then push the middle off line a little bit, or bend a piece of conduit slightly (not enough to distort the cross section, and you'll see the geometry of it. I use the same template at nut, middle, and bridge end.

OK, maybe I wasn't specific enough: if you want to set the scoop set to a specific value for each string, then you might have to give up on the constant radius idea. I go for a little scoop on E, less on A, and most on G... that requires a tighter radius at the middle of the fingerboard.

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OK, maybe I wasn't specific enough: if you want to set the scoop set to a specific value for each string, then you might have to give up on the constant radius idea. I go for a little scoop on E, less on A, and most on G... that requires a tighter radius at the middle of the fingerboard.

Hmmm. Well, I use the same template from end to end, and have a scoop on the G side the equals the thickness of the string, and the one on the E side is considerably less, but the same template fits from end to end. I think Mr. Richwine has the right idea: you can skew the center (think of flexing a hose) toward the E side, thus closing up the "scoop" on that side and widening it on the G side simultaneously, and not change the ends at all, nor change the actual radius at any point.

Perhaps starting out with a dead-straight board with no scoop would be advantageous...can't say, as I have never tried it.

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Don't know how it could relate to violin-making. A lot of you fellows have such tools. I have never used one-- what all do you do/make with them? I have a little wood-lathe with which I hope to make some pegs, but this is a fairly serious steel-mover, for a home shop. 9" swing, 48" bed.

I do intend to learn to use it, but I am curious what other DIY guys do with such tools.

It has a 4-jaw and a 3-jaw chuck, as well as the other kind of chuck to hold a drill bit in the tailstock. Everything seems to be there, but what do I know? It could be virtually stripped, and I would not know it. The motor, belt, all the flat-belt pulleys, the switch, at least some of the change gears are there, but I 'spect some are missing. The tool slide thing works...nothing is rusted up.

Anyway. Nice toy. Just gotta figure out what to do with it. :)

Post a pic or two. Do you have a stand for it ? The original stand ?

The 1st thing to do will be to level it. Cast iron takes a set and is difficult to fix afterwards. Go to "practical machinist" forum : you'll get there ALL the advise and info you might need. Look for a chap named Forrest Addy - superb hand at machine tools.

And get a proper lathe tool grinder with a cup stone and proper tool rest. You should never use but HSS with NO cobalt toolbits. Carbide is not good for your machine.

Do not run the lathe not leveled ! PM for details as it is quite involved.

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Post a pic or two. Do you have a stand for it ? The original stand ?

The 1st thing to do will be to level it. Cast iron takes a set and is difficult to fix afterwards. Go to "practical machinist" forum : you'll get there ALL the advise and info you might need. Look for a chap named Forrest Addy - superb hand at machine tools.

And get a proper lathe tool grinder with a cup stone and proper tool rest. You should never use but HSS with NO cobalt toolbits. Carbide is not good for your machine.

Do not run the lathe not leveled ! PM for details as it is quite involved.

Nope. I'm quite sure this is not the original stand. It is a tray, for lack of better term, of perhaps 1/4" steel, with legs of rectangular steel tube, 2" x 4" x 3/16" wall, at a guess. All looks like a DIY but nicely done. The legs and tray bolt all the way through the feet of the lathe. Thanks for the warning on the leveling. I hadn't thought of that; though, so far, it hasn't even been reassembled. And my back is still feeling the aftermath of moving it into my shed. :(

Chet

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Nope. I'm quite sure this is not the original stand. It is a tray, for lack of better term, of perhaps 1/4" steel, with legs of rectangular steel tube, 2" x 4" x 3/16" wall, at a guess. All looks like a DIY but nicely done. The legs and tray bolt all the way through the feet of the lathe. Thanks for the warning on the leveling. I hadn't thought of that; though, so far, it hasn't even been reassembled. And my back is still feeling the aftermath of moving it into my shed. :(

Chet

I know the feeling. These things are heavier than they look. But the "tray" seem OK to me. Undo the screws holding the bed to the "tray". That should give some protection until you get around to level it.

Again, please do not run it out of level. The vibrations will set ( stress relieve ) the CI in the wrong alignment. It's going to be a chore to fix.

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The carriage is there, and I can move it back and forth by hand--I haven't reinstalled the motor, yet. But the carriage control you have is about four times the size of what I have, and much more complex-- mine is forward, reverse and neutral or off, or something. It only has one lever that flips left and right.

I'll get photos up eventually.

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Wow, really sounds like fun. I was lucky enough to go to a school that had a very nice machine shop with an excellent teacher that emphasized safety. Another teacher (one that never taught safety in his shop class) was visiting the machine shop one day, he got too close to a spinning lathe that ripped his shirt off but left his collar and tie. The disrobed teacher thought this was a great joke and showed off his missing shirt for the rest of the day, never realizing how close he came to "mangled". Later this same teacher would be responsible for a students fatal electrocution while welding, for lack of safety instruction.

Scott

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