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Made in London


martin swan

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Very confused by the wording on this one ....

"Made in London"

Although the seller says its "labeled Made in London" ie not made in London, he/she then says it "shows German influences, as many English violins ..... do".

Maybe I've missed a whole school of English violin-making - can someone enlighten me?

The tonewoods were apparently imported from Saxony - presumably by that time they had been joined together into a Saxon violin?

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It’s an obvious “Dutzendarbeit” from the Markneukirchen/Schönbach area, nothing to argue about there, however the reference to a label “Made in London” could easily just be a statement of fact.

The english only seem to have made school instruments in the period around +/- 1800. Even then, people like C. & S. Thompson, Preston etc. had them made by outworkers in the cheaper suburbs. That died out 1820ish after the blockade of continental ports (due to a tiff with Napoleon) finished and London Dealers imported (and labeled/stamped) first Mittenwald fiddles, because they were much cheaper, then saxon ones, which were cheaper still.

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Quote from seller:

The tonewoods were obviously imported from the Saxon Markneukirchen / Klingenthal region.

What the seller fails to say ( and am sure knows) is that the timbers were not in their "raw" state, but already made into a violin when they were imported. :)

I'm sure that you too will acknowledge that there is a subtle difference between a lie and being "economical with the facts".

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I'm sure that you too will acknowledge that there is a subtle difference between a lie and being "economical with the facts".

Yes, the correct definition would be "dis-information", the act of deliberately leading someone to an incorrect conclusion. Dis-information carried out in a commercial context is also known as "mis-selling".

Of course I'm not talking about this listing or this particular seller, just talking about use of language.

I remember buying a violin 20 years ago - the seller explained "I'm not actually selling it as an Audinot" in such a way that I thoroughly believed it must be one! It's a great skill ...

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I like my Markneukirchen scrolls to be a little more egg shaped. rolleyes.gif I find the "squashed cinnamon roll" style unattractive. This no doubt influenced the hammer price? laugh.gif

Maybe having the garland corners protrude beyond the back and belly corners is an English school feature? blink.gif Or not...

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The protruding corners matches well the scroll and the poor bumpy shaped neck. The use of language is very creative in this case. If I read the words "fine instrument, beautiful condition, excellent condition, very fine and delicate", I would definitely expect another fiddle than that. Hopefully the "powerful, radiant sound which is clear and precise, of a matured character, rich in sound colours, of excellent strengh and unique in character" compensates the appearance.

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