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Ebay Collin-Mezin


martin swan

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If you were the seller of this violin, how much would you "be happy to see it go for ...." (see 'Questions' at the bottom of the listing)?

Collin-Mezin on Ebay

Quite bizarre to refuse two offers of cash, without even asking how much! Maybe the seller was suspicious about the similar wording and sentence structure. I'd have taken anything over £500 myself ....

Or perhaps there's a split personality at work in which the owner of the supposed Collin Mezin likes it so much he puts it on Ebay so that he can buy it from himself.

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"All that glisters is not gold" ... but nor is it necessarily dogpoo

As Peter says, a nice Mirecourt violin in decent condition, just not Collin Mezin.

What I object to is the fact that this seller leads us oh so subtly to believe it is, and that at least 2 buyers are interested in buying it for cash .... this is a professional seller well versed in Collin Mezins, posing on Ebay as a fool.

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No it's an oldish Mirecourt instrument (1930 at the latest), it's just not a Collin Mezin. The label and signature may well be a new addition, though there are plenty of Mirecourt instruments with authentic fake C-M labels!!

According to the seller's offical website he has a large collection of old wood from Mirecourt - perhaps he acquired some labels along with the wood ...

Any particular reason why you're not interested in French fiddles?

Martin Swan Violins

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Any particular reason why you're not interested in French fiddles?

No, and I've no real idea why not, either. It's just that I've never seen one that appealed.

I've the same lack of interest in most Strads, even though I believe he cut the single most elegant-looking fiddle head in the world during his "pre-Strad" days. But his f-holes? Ugly. Lifetime supply of ugly. He must have been at the grappa when he laid them out. And he had a beautiful model, too, that he could have adopted: the Amati ones. His later scrolls are like his f-holes: ugly. I definitely blame the grappa.

Perhaps I've never fancied the French fiddles because they're all Strad-model?

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He is one of the worst type of so called `respectable professional dealers`, who give the trade and ebay a bad name.He claims in the listing to have had to look up Collin-Mezin prices despite being in the trade for decades.I bet several of the `respectable dealers` on here know who he is and have possibly had dealings with him. :(

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I also know who this person is, and find it pretty hard to keep my mouth shut. His website goes into great detail about just how expert he is, how good at recognizing "sleepers" in the auction houses etc. He is always at Sothebys, Bromptons, Bonhams etc - as you say, not the sort of person who would have to google Collin Mezin!

But we shouldn't abuse the forum any further ..... and we mustn't name names.

What I'd like to know is whether anyone shares my lack of respect for real Collin Mezin instruments - I'm a big fan of Mirecourt violins and Mirecourt makers, but I think that Collin Mezin (including CH. JB himself) is a massively over-rated name. I had a look through my auction notes and it seems I really don't like them .... Collin Mezin Tone Review

They are sometimes very prettily made, but in general the tone is glassy and abrasive, often wretchedly so ....

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I also know who this person is, and find it pretty hard to keep my mouth shut. His website goes into great detail about just how expert he is, how good at recognizing "sleepers" in the auction houses etc. He is always at Sothebys, Bromptons, Bonhams etc - as you say, not the sort of person who would have to google Collin Mezin!

But we shouldn't abuse the forum any further ..... and we mustn't name names.

What I'd like to know is whether anyone shares my lack of respect for real Collin Mezin instruments - I'm a big fan of Mirecourt violins and Mirecourt makers, but I think that Collin Mezin (including CH. JB himself) is a massively over-rated name. I had a look through my auction notes and it seems I really don't like them .... Collin Mezin tone review

They are sometimes very prettily made, but in general the tone is glassy and abrasive, often wretchedly so ....

Hello Mr.Swan;

Thank you for your most interesting post as I am new and really never thought I would see such an accurate description of Collin Mezin's violins on this forum. Over the years I have owned a few(but not for long) and played on many, and they all fit your description to a T. OT

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What I'd like to know is whether anyone shares my lack of respect for real Collin Mezin instruments - I'm a big fan of Mirecourt violins and Mirecourt makers, but I think that Collin Mezin (including CH. JB himself) is a massively over-rated name. I had a look through my auction notes and it seems I really don't like them .... Collin Mezin tone review

They are sometimes very prettily made, but in general the tone is glassy and abrasive, often wretchedly so ....

Actually, for what they are, I rather like early Collin-Mezin instruments... though the output of the shop does turn despicable toward the turn of the century. The earliest ones ones can even be a bit less "cookie-cutter" than they become by the mid/late 1880s. I haven't read your review, but a number of the models can be quite successful, tonally, once the neck and bassbar are put right (and you'll usually not see those that have been at the auction houses). They come in rather handy for talented conservatory students that can't afford more expensive instruments, but still need decent performance from what they can afford, and they are worth just enough that going to the trouble to put them right is worthwhile. The earlier cellos can be really rather nice and had a good following when they were being made, I believe... and still do.

I agree about the "Le Victorieux" instruments. A complete waste of wood.

Perhaps I've never fancied the French fiddles because they're all Strad-model?

bean... Maybe you've only seen Strad models? Chanot, Vuillaume, Lupot, the Silvestres, Miremont, Bernardel, Audinot, Bailly, Germain, Derazey, Collin-Mezin, Caussin, etc. all made other models. Some of the better makers had rather nice interpretations. I particularly like Chanot Guarneri model fiddles.

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Oops posted the wrong link sorry ... here's the right one : Collin Mezin at auction

Jeffrey, it's true that all the instruments I've rated have been 1887 or later, and I did play one five years ago which was quite different to look at and completely different in sound, being overwhelmingly mellow and fruity, quite delicate also.

I'd be very interested to know what's wrong with the bassbars - I have noticed the neck angles tend to be very high, which seems a general fault amongst better Mirecourt trade instruments.

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I'd be very interested to know what's wrong with the bassbars - I have noticed the neck angles tend to be very high, which seems a general fault amongst better Mirecourt trade instruments.

In general, the bars are whimpy. The neck sets, as you've pointed out, generally don't have enough of an overstand, so the angle is too steep. They need to be brought out from the body a little when reset.

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In general, the bars are whimpy. The neck sets, as you've pointed out, generally don't have enough of an overstand, so the angle is too steep. They need to be brought out from the body a little when reset.

Jeffrey,

It occurs to me that I'm very slapdash about measuring the overstand.

Because of the amount of variability in different types of edges, do you measure from the purfling upwards? Measuring from the high point of the edge (which is what I've been doing) suddenly seems illogical.

I'm sure this is first grade stuff, I was probably sleeping.

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Jeffrey,

It occurs to me that I'm very slapdash about measuring the overstand.

Because of the amount of variability in different types of edges, do you measure from the purfling upwards? Measuring from the high point of the edge (which is what I've been doing) suddenly seems illogical.

I'm sure this is first grade stuff, I was probably sleeping.

It's usually not too much of an issue though, really. A half mm of wear on the top of the edge would really be a huge (and unusual) amount of wear in that particular spot on a decently maintained instrument (it's protected by the neck root). If the edge thin in that area it's more usually due due to loss of wood on the underside, when the top has been removed and reattached in the past.

It's probably important to point out that there is some variation in where the measurement is taken. If using a spec, it's good to know where it applies. :)

Anyway, if there is a problem with the edge, my procedure helps compensate anyway. I routinely plug the mortice... and the plug, or sometimes added spruce at the edge, give me a nice even platform to measure from. I do the final shaping of these inserts just before gluing.

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