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daddy-o496

Gouges for scroll carving.

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I have a bunch of gouges, but when carving the scroll they seem to be not right for the job. Would you please tell me the sizes of the gouges that you have designated for scroll carving. Thanx, Vic. P.S.-Where do you get your hide glue?

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My scroll gouges are ALL homemade from standard hacksaw blades, overall length about five inches. One set out-cannel and one set in-cannel. When I need one a little different it takes a few minutes to make it.

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My scroll gouges are ALL homemade from standard hacksaw blades, overall length about five inches. One set out-cannel and one set in-cannel. When I need one a little different it takes a few minutes to make it.

Pictures Please!

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grizzly sells a set of 6, but the sweeps are not given. Very low price for Japanese steel. Is the steel any good? Has anyone tried them?

Roughly a number 6. The steel isn't bad, though I wouldn't compare it to good japanese steel. All in all, not a bad buy. I have the fortune and the curse to live near a grizzly outlet.

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Oded, I'm working on it, but I don't think they will show much. They're just gouges, after all.

Chet, yes, that's the one. I didn't make the swage block he recommends, I just find suitable rods to bend them around. Not as elegant, but they serve my purposes.

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Here are a couple that are about as well as I can do. The sweeps don't show well, but are fairly flat on left to about 1/4" radius on right. There is one in each made from a 1.25" band saw blade. Handles are maple (out-cannels) shaped on belt sander, and broom handle (in-cannels). I also use a couple of thin straight chisels ground to fingernail shape (my original "gouges").

Out-cannels:

post-23848-0-17801400-1323571152_thumb.jpg

In-cannels:

post-23848-0-09322900-1323570786_thumb.jpg

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Here are a couple that are about as well as I can do. The sweeps don't show well, but are fairly flat on left to about 1/4" radius on right. There is one in each made from a 1.25" band saw blade. Handles are maple (out-cannels) shaped on belt sander, and broom handle (in-cannels). I also use a couple of thin straight chisels ground to fingernail shape (my original "gouges").

Out-cannels:

post-23848-0-17801400-1323571152_thumb.jpg

In-cannels:

post-23848-0-09322900-1323570786_thumb.jpg

Beautiful tools. Nothing fancy, just tools made to do a job. I bet they work very well. How did you bend the radius and temper them?

Berl

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Hi, Berl,

I use high carbon (cheap) blades. Heating them red hot with a propane torch and cooling in air anneals them. Then I cold form them around appropriate rods, 1/4" dia for the tightest and for the tang part of the rest. A vise and hammer are all you need. Steel pipe works for the larger radii.

Then reheat the cutting end to red and quench. I use water. Finally, temper to a staw color, all with the propane torch.

These gouges sharpen easily and hold an edge as well as any I own. They cut very well, in part because of being so thin.

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Hi, Berl,

I use high carbon (cheap) blades. Heating them red hot with a propane torch and cooling in air anneals them. Then I cold form them around appropriate rods, 1/4" dia for the tightest and for the tang part of the rest. A vise and hammer are all you need. Steel pipe works for the larger radii.

Then reheat the cutting end to red and quench. I use water. Finally, temper to a staw color, all with the propane torch.

These gouges sharpen easily and hold an edge as well as any I own. They cut very well, in part because of being so thin.

captain,

What high carbon blades? Available at Lowe's or where?

Thanks

John

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John,

I recommend looking for the article Chet mentioned on the SCAVM website. I don't have a link, but the article title is "Scroll Carving Tools from Hacksaw Blades." He mentions hacksaw blades, bandsaw blades and clock springs. The key is high carbon steel for easy working and heat treating, which in hacksaws means the cheapest you can find. I don't use new ones, only worn out ones. Many stores now have only HHS, which I believe would have to be formed hot. Most Chinese blades, available in bulk packs of 10 or more for very little, are high carbon steel.

To get back to where, I'm not sure. Look for a store that has at least two qualities or hit a flea market or yard sales. I've bought a handful of used blades for a quarter, a few of which were even still useful for cutting metal. Hope this helps.

Lyle

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grizzly sells a set of 6, but the sweeps are not given. Very low price for Japanese steel. Is the steel any good? Has anyone tried them?

I have most of the Grizzly Japanese gouges and consider them to be fair tools. They come sharp, stay sharp awhile, and resharpen decently. I usually just touch up the edges on a 1000 grit Jap waterstone before attacking each set of top and backplates. Their downside is that they will rust very easily, especially the steel rings on the handles. I also don't like that they hurt the palm of my right hand after awhile when I'm pushing them thru hard maple.

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Here it is:

http://www.scavm.com/gouges.htm

Pretty good stuff, really. Especially if you are just starting out and are not flush with money for expensive tools.

Nice, I would just suggest using a piece of hardwood drilled and cut for a forming die,if the piece is cut so that the end grain is the work surface, it can be real tough, and cheap, and easy...especially for larger radius'.

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Good idea! I had not thought of using wood for a forming die. I made all mine of different sizes of (matching radius) pipes and round bars. I welded a half-pipe section onto a short piece of square stock to fit the hardy-hole on my anvil, then welded the round bar to a spingy section of thin steel, which, in turn, was bent into a hairpin curve, and welded to the half-pipe, so that the round bar is always poised above the pipe, ready to be smacked with a hammer, but always bounces back up offering adequate clearance for the blade stock.

Overkill for this task, I know...but it was fun.

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Just want to throw this out there for you: My favorite scroll gouge is a 2.5 sweep Ashley Iles gouge that I flipped on my Tormek. This would be very similar to taking a chisel and slightly rounding the back. (Advice from my old varnish teacher.) It is a 1/2 inch wide.

It is very useful for the pegbox walls, inside and out. The sweep is so slight that you can get very close to the finished product without leaving any little dig marks from your chisels. The very slight sweep also means that it can be treated just like a chisel when sharpening, no slips required.

http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com//Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=toolshop&Product_Code=IL-CP-212.XX&Category_Code=&Search=chris%20pye

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Good idea! I had not thought of using wood for a forming die. I made all mine of different sizes of (matching radius) pipes and round bars. I welded a half-pipe section onto a short piece of square stock to fit the hardy-hole on my anvil, then welded the round bar to a spingy section of thin steel, which, in turn, was bent into a hairpin curve, and welded to the half-pipe, so that the round bar is always poised above the pipe, ready to be smacked with a hammer, but always bounces back up offering adequate clearance for the blade stock.

Overkill for this task, I know...but it was fun.

I expect you saved some time and frustration in the long run....good tools make a big difference.

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I prefer short gouges (I like the Captain's.) and use Flexcut gouges. I sharpen them with the Grizzly sharpening wheels on a toolpost grinder. And I test using the Burgess arm hair technique.

Stay Tuned.

Mike

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BTW, the

shows some nice gouge work on a scroll.

I love watching that video; that guy really rips. I see something new every time... like the humongous jointer in the first 30 seconds.

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Good idea! I had not thought of using wood for a forming die. I made all mine of different sizes of (matching radius) pipes and round bars. I welded a half-pipe section onto a short piece of square stock to fit the hardy-hole on my anvil, then welded the round bar to a spingy section of thin steel, which, in turn, was bent into a hairpin curve, and welded to the half-pipe, so that the round bar is always poised above the pipe, ready to be smacked with a hammer, but always bounces back up offering adequate clearance for the blade stock.

Overkill for this task, I know...but it was fun.

Chet !

Only YOU are weird enought to come up with THAT idea !

It's great !

I think I'll combine it with MY idea ,,,spring loaded ,,,huh,

I use sockets,impact sockets work great as they are tough, ,I have a vise that I've abused for 30 years,,

so the inside of the jaw edge is smooth, (important)!!

I heat up the stock till it glows, place it on top of the predetermined opening of the vise,,

and SMACK !! with a sledge,,the resultant piece is formed perfectly to the raidus of your choice,,from tiny,,, to Gargansjumitious,,,,!!!!

no molds,,forms,,nothing to make,,though,,,,,,,,,it can get a little weird holding the hot steel and socket with the same hand ,,,,so with chets idea,,,,,,hum,,,I wonder?

If you want a flat radius,,use a really big socket,,if you want round,,open the vise so the socket barely slips into the vise,,minus the thickness of the stock.

And Vu Wall La !!!

Dinner is served !

Evan

http://fiddlehack.com

(The last photo is titled "My children fiddles and car doors")

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