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Isn't this Amazing?


GoldenPlate

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‎"In Washington DC , at a Metro Station, on a cold January morning in 2007, a man with a violin played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, approximately 2000 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.

After about four minutes, a middle-aged man noticed that there was a musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds, and then he hurried on to meet his schedule.

About four minutes later, the violinist received his first dollar. A woman threw money in the hat and, without stopping, continued to walk.

At six minutes, a young man leaned against the wall to listen to him, then looked at his watch and started to walk again.

At ten minutes, a three-year old boy stopped, but his mother tugged him along hurriedly. The kid stopped to look at the violinist again, but the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk, turning his head the whole time. This action was repeated by several other children, but every parent - without exception - forced their children to move on quickly.

At forty-five minutes: The musician played continuously. Only six people stopped and listened for a short while. About twenty gave money but continued to walk at their normal pace. The man collected a total of $32.

After one hour:

He finished playing and silence took over. No one noticed and no one applauded. There was no recognition at all.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the greatest musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, with a violin worth $3.5 million dollars. Two days before, Joshua Bell sold-out a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100 each to sit and listen to him play the same music.

This is a true story. Joshua Bell, playing incognito in the D.C. Metro Station, was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste and people’s priorities.

This experiment raised several questions:

In a common-place environment, at an inappropriate hour, do we perceive beauty?

If so, do we stop to appreciate it?

Do we recognize talent in an unexpected context?

One possible conclusion reached from this experiment could be this:

If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world, playing some of the finest music ever written, with one of the most beautiful instruments ever made…

How many other things are we missing as we rush through life?"

Video : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=myq8upzJDJc

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‎"In Washington DC , at a Metro Station, on a cold January morning in 2007, a man with a violin played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, approximately 2000 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.

After about four minutes, a middle-aged man noticed that there was a musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds, and then he hurried on to meet his schedule.

About four minutes later, the violinist received his first dollar. A woman threw money in the hat and, without stopping, continued to walk.

At six minutes, a young man leaned against the wall to listen to him, then looked at his watch and started to walk again.

At ten minutes, a three-year old boy stopped, but his mother tugged him along hurriedly. The kid stopped to look at the violinist again, but the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk, turning his head the whole time. This action was repeated by several other children, but every parent - without exception - forced their children to move on quickly.

At forty-five minutes: The musician played continuously. Only six people stopped and listened for a short while. About twenty gave money but continued to walk at their normal pace. The man collected a total of $32.

After one hour:

He finished playing and silence took over. No one noticed and no one applauded. There was no recognition at all.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the greatest musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, with a violin worth $3.5 million dollars. Two days before, Joshua Bell sold-out a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100 each to sit and listen to him play the same music.

This is a true story. Joshua Bell, playing incognito in the D.C. Metro Station, was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste and people’s priorities.

This experiment raised several questions:

In a common-place environment, at an inappropriate hour, do we perceive beauty?

If so, do we stop to appreciate it?

Do we recognize talent in an unexpected context?

One possible conclusion reached from this experiment could be this:

If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world, playing some of the finest music ever written, with one of the most beautiful instruments ever made…

How many other things are we missing as we rush through life?"

Video : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=myq8upzJDJc

Observation; I remember this study well; what might be the results had the person been playing rock guitar with a drummer and a loud amp? My guess is tht the trains would of been very late. OT

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Yes but in the summer I was in a pedestrianised area of a provincial city in England where a Romanian street band was playing. There was a changing audience of about 50 who all listened for quite a long time. I think this experiment proves that people who are in a hurry to get to work don't stop. If he had been playing on the platform he might have had a different result.

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There's a group in Montreal, or Quebec City, that wander into metro stations, suddenly pull out instruments, and start playing. When they're done, they fade away. No talking, just music and gone. No pass the hat either.

I wish I could find their youtube videos. sad.gif

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How many times have we musicians heard from someone at a party, concert, or wedding, how, "Oh you are wonderful. I just can't live without music!" ? Well, maybe they can't, but they can certainly live without paying for music. And music to most people is anything that has a rhythmic noise. They don't have any need to differentiate between Josh Bell, a kid with a guitar and an amp, or their bride's sister singing "You light up my life", accompanied by a poorly rehearsed string quartet that finds it impossible to follow her total lack of rhythm.

I'm convinced that even at concerts of great orchestras, a large number in the audience don't have any real appreciation and understanding of what they are hearing.

I'm afraid that whether it's Josh Bell or you or I playing a violin, whether it's in the tube or a concert hall, we will always be playing primarily for ourselves and a very small number who know enough to really get it. When Bell plays in the subway, you and I hear him as a violinist doing wonderful things on a wonderful violin, but to almost everyone else, it is just "music", and they hear "music" all day every day, and to them there is no real difference. Actually, I'm surprised he made as much money as he did!

I'm not willing to be too hard on the "average Joe". Rather, I feel sorry for him/her. A friend once said to me, "Life is a great buffet and most people are eating hamburgers". But Josh Bell playing in a subway and being largely ignored, doesn't prove anything in the matter, IMO. On the other hand, Vanessa Mae would have no doubt made a lot more than $32! But I'm not sure I want to know what that would prove!

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If he had played at a park during lunch time in warm weather, I am sure there would have been a crowd. At 7 am in a metro people are trying to go to work, if they are late they may increase their chances of losing their job. And who wants to lose their job nowadays? Poor experiment I think, unless one is testing listening to a busker versus not being late to work and getting fired.

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maybe the problem was his stradivari, according to some experts on this forum the're just not as good as modern violins, maybe he could recreate the event and play on a burgess or darton, he might get more tips, i for one would like to hear about it!!!!

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My take on this when it came up earlier is that busking is different from concert performing. No matter how accomplished a player you are, when you place yourself in a situation like a subway station your success depends upon your ability to attract, hold and entertain an audience. I can't speak to Bell's personality, but I'd say that working on his performance would make a big difference.

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I had a thought that this might have been a PR gimmick that went bad....Like J. Bell was going to come down from his lofty perch and play for "the working people" and get some good working class publicity, and street cred. Any of that is lost as you can see, the "working people" don't care, and the music world inteligensia is left to puzzle over the meaning of it. Come on Josh....Nigel Kennedy allegedly had a drug habit and made a Jimi Hendrix album.....Rachel Barton Pine plays electric heavy metal, Hillary Hahn plays with singer/songwriters, you can do better than this.

It also says something about packaging and branding. Many of the people who passed would probably be glad to shell out hundreds of dollars to see him in concert in a real venue, because this is what they've been taught is "good music by a good performer" simply because that is what they are spoon fed, and they don't actually recognize good music or a good performance if it's right there in front of them.....unless it's in the correct package.

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[quo

+++++++++++++++

There is a time and a place for everything. It is just at a wrong time and at a wrong place.

People are in a hurry to make their paychecks. It is a responsible thing to do just go to work.

If you are late at work, who is going to forgive you? Your landlord asking your rent. Your car loan is

needed to pay in full. Your girlfriend is hospital. who knows?

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maybe its a class thing, joshua bell is used to playing for rich people, i bet nigel kennedy could have done better. or maybe if joshua had done requests, like xmas songs, in todays day and age only about 10% of the people appreciate bach, if even that i would guess

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IMO this is such a poorly planned publicity stunt and it proves nothing. How many people are in the mood to listen to the Chaconne while scurrying to get to work or back home? How about playing different repertoire, more engagingly by the way, losing the stupid baseball cap and communicating with the audience rather than hiding from it, on the weekend? Don't think he played very well either, but I've never been a fan.

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