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Oded Kishony

tools of the violin varnisher

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That's a type of shark skin. Where do you buy or obtain it from?

OK

There are many different species of Dogfish, Mustelus mustelus is the one that worked best for me.It is grey and has a white belly. It's the Italian "Palombo", the one Sacconi described in his book. It has very fine "grain" and works well for removing dust particles without too much affecting the surrounding area. Soaked in water for a day, it gets very soft and elastic, therefore you can use it also on the scroll and on the edges. When stretching the skin, the grain gets coarser.

I got it from the local fishmonger. Beside being useful in the workshop, it is delicious as well.... :)

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......It's the Italian "Palombo", the one Sacconi described in his book. It has very fine "grain" and works well for removing dust particles without too much affecting the surrounding area. Soaked in water for a day, it gets very soft and elastic, therefore you can use it also on the scroll and on the edges. When stretching the skin, the grain gets coarser.....

Ciao Bernhard.

So you just skin the fish and let the skin dry, or you treat it someway after? (Guess garlic, celery and toamato is not the right answer ;) ).

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Ciao Bernhard.

So you just skin the fish and let the skin dry, or you treat it someway after? (Guess garlic, celery and toamato is not the right answer ;) ).

Ciao Alberto!

The raw skin is carefully prepared by removing the edible stuff, then dried. I am still using skins I prepared years ago, but you should store them in a dry place.

The edible stuff is prepared with onion, parsley and white wine, or following your own recipe...! :P

I will post a picture of the dried skins later.

Edit: Here is a picture:

post-30090-0-13671800-1319219337_thumb.jpg

Both skins are from the same animal, the white one is from the belly.

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......The raw skin is carefully prepared by removing the edible stuff, then dried. I am still using skins I prepared years ago, but you should store them in a dry place.....

Seems there is a thousand ways to skin (cook) a shark :D .

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personally, i don't.

I don't abrade, smooth, or anything else between coats either. What's the argument for doing this?

If one applies alternating color and varnish layers, I could see some justification, but that's not my model of Cremonese varnish.

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At least on my first couple of coats, I do: the thought being to rid myself of the little "zits" that invariably appear, and which I assume are the result of miniscule fibers of wood that were left by whatever means I had finally smoothed the bare wood. Not good thinking?

It seems to help. And even so, when I saw a close-up photo of someone else's work, I thought theirs looked a great deal smoother than mine. Maybe I didn't get the wood itself sufficiently shiny?

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I don't abrade, smooth, or anything else between coats either. What's the argument for doing this?

If one applies alternating color and varnish layers, I could see some justification, but that's not my model of Cremonese varnish.

I do it to remove Cocker Spaniel hair! Seriously, a pain in the butt. My next big goal is to build a large air cleaner and set op a pressurized clean room for varnishing ....thanks for the target David....

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My next big goal is to build a large air cleaner and set op a pressurized clean room for varnishing

At one time I had that goal, too. Finally decided I couldn't have that much dedicated space, so ended up making a portable flow bench instead. Solved the airborne problem, but there are other zit sources...

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what's a portable flow bench?

Yes, I look over the surface and pick out any bits and nits that ended up on the surface, often using my fingernail. On my current instrument, a cello, for some reason the neck and scroll produced a rough surface after the first coat, which I felt needed to be smoothed if I wanted a uniform color.

OK

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I don't abrade, smooth, or anything else between coats either. What's the argument for doing this?

If one applies alternating color and varnish layers, I could see some justification, but that's not my model of Cremonese varnish.

I agree.

On the other hand if a large moth finds it's way into my uv set-up and gets stuck to the varnish I will try to remedy the effects.

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I have a rough coat Collie that generates profuse amounts of hair. Perhaps it would be easier to build a vacuum chamber for the dog.;)

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I don't abrade, smooth, or anything else between coats either. What's the argument for doing this?

Removing dust particles, where oil varnish might accumulate. It's not for smoothing.

Unfortunately I don't work under dust controlled atmosphere ;) ....

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