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Ground color ?


AndreaA

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From the 16th century, annatto was occasionally used in Europe for color in varnishes, oils, waxes, and stains.

I wonder if the Cremona guys ever used any of that to add color to their varnish?

so it could be Otranto earth which is an opaque brown earth pigment or annatto which is bright orange...

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If you read the list of synonyms on that link, it specifies that terra oriana is Italian for the material we call annatto. It also says how to make a lake from it, and in what it is soluble, as well as the fact that it is not particularly light-fast. But it also says it is sold as "butter-color". I remember when you could buy butter color in stores. I don't know where you could get it now.

An orange wash underneath varnish seems pretty believable to me.

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Annatto is available in the spice department at the grocery store. I made a lake once from it--a beautiful color that disappeared overnight in the UV lightbox. Though the earlier ones often have interesting varnish, lot of later Poggis are essentially non-colored. If he was using amber and linseed oil, that would be about the color they are now.

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I was curious to see what a instrument would look like if it was to have a golden ground applied to all of the instrument with the exception of the top and bottom plate corners as well as not applying in the wear patterns on the back.I would like to get opinions .

I suppose it might look like many of the very yellow/golden stringed instruments in early paintings.

Oripment seems a likely component in at least some early grounds. As someone mentioned, arsenic shows up in some of the published info, and orpiment was used in the period. Cenini mentions both its danger and its beauty.

post-30802-0-17985600-1314374733_thumb.jpg

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  • 3 months later...

At least some of them might have suffered some strange disease until someone (I think people called him William de Baskerville but his real name was Sean Connery) figured out maybe it was not a very good idea to taste the yellow paint :D ...

Anyway today cadmium yellow rules. And a weld lake is really wonderful as a ground.

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At least some of them might have suffered some strange disease until someone (I think people called him William de Baskerville but his real name was Sean Connery) figured out maybe it was not a very good idea to taste the yellow paint :D ...

I never lick my fingers anymore to turn the page. :)

Melvin, what color do you aim for them. More of an amber?

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carlo,

Nice for submarines....not so much for ground.

on we go,

Joe

Very nice look, but i can't tell from the pic if it is maple or not or some other like wood, sure looks like maple or sycamore to me. If so i could help you to get even more chatoyancy and dimensional depth by use of chemical mordants, if interested and it is maple, get back

sincerely,

chemmy

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Very nice look, but i can't tell from the pic if it is maple or not or some other like wood, sure looks like maple or sycamore to me. If so i could help you to get even more chatoyancy and dimensional depth by use of chemical mordants, if interested and it is maple, get back

sincerely,

chemmy

chemmy,

Yes, this is maple....American. Actually this ground showed excellent depth and reflection, though it may not be evident in the photo. What is your application of mordants on the bare wood?

Joe

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