Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

A Violin by Pareschi


Maestro
 Share

Recommended Posts

One of my pupils brought a Gaetano Pareschi violin made in 1933 to lesson yesterday. It had a grafted neck, but I am pretty sure the scroll was original. Can anybody shine some light on as to why a violin made in 1933 would have a grafted neck? There were no signs of any repairs around the neck or anywhere else.

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gaetano Pareschi (Ferrara - 1900-1987), a professional violinist, self taught maker. His son Giancarlo was the concertmaster in Rio de Janeiro, and his

granddaughter Antonella is a fine violinist in Rio de Janeiro too. You can find more information about Gaetano Pareschi in Eric Blot's book "Un Secolo di Liuteria Italiana - 1860-1960", Vol. I, Emilia Romagna.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sometimes grafting is seen when scrolls/heads have been carved from other, less figured, wood because of ease of carving, or more often, is considered more aesthetically pleasing than the typical flame-patterned maple neck wood.

post-5156-0-35782100-1312072137_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

a lot of 20th century italian makers used original to manufacture grafts as a form of antiqueing, to make the violin look more like an original 1700s, scarampella did this i think, i dont think it has anything to do with conserving wood and everything to do with looking old, my 1900 raffaele calace?? had a original grafted neck, signs of an original graft are original varnish, not touch up covering the graft and the heel of the neck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not that I've seen anywhere close to all of them, but based on (a good number) of the instruments I have seen, I don't think Pareschi was the kind to do a graft with the intent of giving the impression of age. Actually, I'd be little surprised if he went to the trouble of doing a graft to conserve wood... and nothing I've seen would indicate grafting was part of his routine (like G. Wulme-Hudson). He was a pretty straight ahead, basic (nothing fancy), maker and tended to use multiple brand stamps on the inside of his instruments. Chances are there was a measurement problem, or damage, that required the neck be replaced at a later time.

When I was in Ferrara in the early '90s I visited with a relative of his. Nephew I think. He's a postman and amateur maker.

Omo... either my eyes are really tired, or it's your imagination.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

jefferey is assuming, for good reason, i hope, that the graft is not original to manufacture, my comments were on violins that have the graft original to manufacture, people in the buisness sometimes get the idea a violin isnt valuable unless it has a graft, new builders were trying hard to compete with older grafted violins, hence the idea of some level of quality being associated with the grafted neck, and new makers grafting brand new violins, still happens today

Link to comment
Share on other sites

jefferey is assuming, for good reason, i hope, that the graft is not original to manufacture, my comments were on violins that have the graft original to manufacture, people in the buisness sometimes get the idea a violin isnt valuable unless it has a graft, new builders were trying hard to compete with older grafted violins, hence the idea of some level of quality being associated with the grafted neck, and new makers grafting brand new violins, still happens today

Yes the "grafters" right up there with the griffters :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

a lot of 20th century italian makers used original to manufacture grafts as a form of antiqueing, to make the violin look more like an original 1700s, scarampella did this i think, i dont think it has anything to do with conserving wood and everything to do with looking old, my 1900 raffaele calace?? had a original grafted neck, signs of an original graft are original varnish, not touch up covering the graft and the heel of the neck

Lyndon, where do you get this conclusion from,to my knowledge not many 20th century Italian makers grafted from new. Not many 20th century Italian copyists come to mind at all perhaps Sannino.Along with the odd Rocca ,Guarneri ,Strad copy. Most werent very convincing anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

maybe is should replace lot with significant number, ive seen references to quite a few by various makers and had a neapolitan violin in my shop by calace?, im not saying it was standard, but a percent of 20th century makers graft their scrolls and that percent seem significantly higher with modern italian, than other regions

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lyndon, where do you get this conclusion from,to my knowledge not many 20th century Italian makers grafted from new. Not many 20th century Italian copyists come to mind at all perhaps Sannino.Along with the odd Rocca ,Guarneri ,Strad copy. Most werent very convincing anyway.

I'd add Sgarabotto to that list... but you're correct, I believe... and I think it ws a bit more common with British copyists.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...