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High tension works better !


hghareeb
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Good Day every body ,,

Greeting to everyone here, It has been long time since my last post here I wish you all doing well and fine .

I have a problem with my violin it doesn't project and sound good unless I tune it one note higher ,Otherwise it sounds low and bad , I'm not sure how to describe how it sounds but it's completely change when I higher the tension by tuning it higher than 440 .

I did several trials with no luck ! any advice ?

Regards,

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you might check your string sounding length, if it is less than 327mm that might be the problem, you can move the bridge south and accomplish the same thing while keeping at 440 also try heavy gauge strings instead of medium, or you can convince the orchestra to raise their pitch, some of them already go above 440

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I will check when I'm back home, I tried once to open the bridge eye it makes a little improvement but still not the optimum sound out of it , I always feel the sound nasal and thin However as I mentioned earlier when I raise the pitch to one higher tone it sound much better if not great !! it's not a matter of raising it from 440 to 442 or so,, it needs to be much higher to sounds good ! .

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I agree with Lyndon that moving the bridge might be a thing you can try, or higher tension strings might help. But there are a couple of disadvantages. When moving the bridge, you also change where the sound post and bridge are relative to each other. The sound post may then stand too close to the bridge for the violin to work well. Strings with a higher tension can sometimes be somewhat harder to play. So, these are factors you can play around with, but I think you should try getting your violin to a good lutier. Also, the problems to me sound as if they might be solveable by a simple sound post adjustment.

I don't know where you are from, but your name sounds like something middle eastern or so to me, and I understand it may be hard to find a good lutier there. If you can't visit one personally, you may want to just sent your violin by mail (but only in a really good case so that you don't need to take the bridge down. If you would, then the whole things is pointless since the adjustment may be undone when being transported) to someone to get it adjusted. Good violinmakers will be able to adjust it so the violin works optimally. If it then doesn't sound the way you want you should consider buying another violin. Sounds like you may need another bridge and possibly another sound post. The good thing is that you seem to know exactly what you dislike about the instrument in its current setup, so it should be relatively easy to communicate this to a lutier. Bad thing is, the lutier may not agree with you upon receiving the violin and might be wondering what you are complaining about...

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When you tune up the fiddle, you not only changes the string tension, but also the relation between the notes played and the resonances in the fiddle. I probably have more experience with this than most makers here because tuning the fiddles at different pitches until it sounds best is a typical thing to do on a Hardanger fiddle.

I am not ruling out the possiblity that the increased tension have affected your fiddles response, but I am far more inclined to believe that what you actually hear is a different and better relation between the string harmonics and the fiddles body response. If you play alone and do not need to play in unison with others, why not keep it tuned like that and play it as it is?

If you do need to play in the chamber A, then I would consider getting a better fiddle.

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@anders Can't one influence these resonances of the violin body by fitting a sound post with more or less tension? Couldn't a sound post fit with more tension cause a slight increase in "pitch" of the body resonances? (Dumb players question probably)

The modes does indeed move around a little with the soundpost. My last encounter with nasality, moving the soundpost did not help. Nasality can be related to different frequency regions, at least two, by what I understand. So what works for one type might not work for another. This problem fiddle had a very high frequency related nasality, 6kHz or so and it was an open e.

My experience is also that the fundamentals on the e string is much influened by the soundpost setting, also possibly the balance between the A and E strings if the soundpost is moved east or west in the fiddle. That also affect the depth of the D and G strings, shallower sound the furhter west the post is set. I am not a very trained soundpost setter however, but spend an awful lot of time playing the fiddles when they get the strings on.- In that process the soundpost may or may not be moved. I often use the hammer ring in that process to monitor what happens, but the playing is the main guide.

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...also try heavy gauge strings instead of medium, ...

You can try heavy gauge strings as lyndon suggested, or a different type of string that is higher in tension.

Here is a link to a page showing some string tensions:

String Tensions

Thomastik and D'Addario list tensions on their websites as well.

What kind of strings are on your violin now? If the tensions of the strings you currently have on your violin are listed on one of these resources, and if they are relatively low in tension, you can try another brand that is higher in tension. For even more tension, you can order the heavy gauge (sometimes called stark, forte, or soloist) version of those already high tension strings. You can read online descriptions of the general sound character of the various brands before deciding which higher tension strings to try. However, someone else's perception of a particular string's sound character on their violin may have little to do with your perception of that string's sound character on your violin....

It would be good to talk to your luthier about this matter if possible, both to receive advice and to receive assurance that your violin is structurally sound enough to handle considerably greater tension.

Joe

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Thank you all for your replies ,This violin is made by Myself I didn't mentnioned this sorry for the lack of info. in the first post , I made it about 5 years ago it was one of the best sounding violins that made, I sold it to someone and he kept it in the case for a year without playing ,then he bring it to me to have a look at how it sound ,, Stiff, Nasal and low volume , I advice him to play with the violin and this is very normal if you keep the violin for some time , He did play it for a while ( maybe a month or so,, ) However it's still the same , then I changed the string it was Pirastro chromecore I changed it to Dominant and here I relize the tuning issue I was tuning it higher than 440 and it sounds great when I say great indeed sounded well However when I went back to 440 it dropped !! .

One thing that helps,, to lower the frequencies I open the kidney from the center of the bridge sides that help to reduce the nasal sound but still not it's optimum sound .

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you might check your string sounding length, if it is less than 327mm that might be the problem, you can move the bridge south and accomplish the same thing while keeping at 440 also try heavy gauge strings instead of medium, or you can convince the orchestra to raise their pitch, some of them already go above 440

I dont know if higher gauges may work, I never tried.

I had a smilar post may be 5 years ago.

So far I got after search for some time, some regions are thicker than violin expects.

What is the weight of your violin? This is just for my curiosity.

Apologies..

I think the tension on sound post is as important as position in soundpost adjustment, and it may work.

Sound wise, your violin looks like a good one.

Yeah, why not 446? :)

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Thank you Gents. , The violin front plate thickness is between 3.5 ( In the middle under the bridge ) 3 else where in the middle, to 2.2 in the corners, I will have a look at the topics as (Fiddlessurgeon) maybe I will start with Little mystreries as the header of this topic looks hot :) .

Regards,

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