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Ernest Martel

Corpus Closing Clamps...

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I believe the garland type is preferable when you glue the plate directly, that is you have to get fast to clamp all around the violin. If you are used to put glue on the plate then leave it dry and subsequently use hot water and a thin knife then you have all the time to clamp the spool type, one by one.

Want mine? Used them twice 3 decades ago. They've been in a box since. :)

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Want mine? Used them twice 3 decades ago. They've been in a box since. :)

Thanks Jeffrey, but I use the spool ones. I had to sacrifice a broomstick that was very dear to my heart to make them... :(

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...The VSA journal had a nice article on making closing clamps with 'pie shaped' heads made from some 'plastic or another' that didn't have an affinity for hide glue. Very early edition I think...

I have a photocopy of that article. It was published in the early 1980s, but I don't know the exact date or issue. The title is "Improved Violin and Viola Clamps," and it was written by Louis Lionel Grand. I made three sets of clamps -- two for violin/viola and one for cello -- using and slightly modifying the instructions in the article.

Put simply, what I did was make a number of cuts in sheets of plastic with a router mounted in a circle cutting guide. Then I separated the circles from each other and cut them into segments to make the individual clamp heads, glued leather pads onto the clamping surfaces and fitted hardware (bolts, nuts, washers and protective tubing on the movable heads). There are three different shapes of clamp heads: concave, convex and quarter circles. (I also made some straight clamps for cello.) It took me about three days to make one set.

I've since been told by a plastics guy that the best type of plastic to use would be polycarbonate (Lexan) or ABS because of glue adhesion and other factors. Condit used to sell the same type of clamps made with wooden heads. If I were to make another set, I think I would make the cuts with the lathe that I have since acquired instead of the router.

Shown in my picture, from top to bottom, are: convex cello clamp, concave violin/viola clamp, convex violin/viola clamp and quarter circle violin/viola clamp.

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Want mine? Used them twice 3 decades ago. They've been in a box since. :)

If your serious...please let me know what you'd like to get for them and I'll take them off your hands...were talking about the herdim clamps?...

:)

I'm also making a set of spool clamps...just in case

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If your serious...please let me know what you'd like to get for them and I'll take them off your hands...were talking about the herdim clamps?...

:)

I'm also making a set of spool clamps...just in case

We're talking garland clamps... One per bout type. The individual Herdim clamps I'll be happy to keep. One of the better paybacks (cost per use/income ratio) of any tool in the shop.

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Shown in my picture, from top to bottom, are: convex cello clamp, concave violin/viola clamp, convex violin/viola clamp and quarter circle violin/viola clamp.

If you put the clamps one near the others you should obtain a circle. What are the diameters?

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We're talking garland clamps... One per bout type. The individual Herdim clamps I'll be happy to keep. One of the better paybacks (cost per use/income ratio) of any tool in the shop.

I thought I remember you saying positive things about the Herdim's...Thanks for jumping in on the thread...I was hoping to hear again from Michael about whether the Chinese knockoff were a good buy.

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Ernie,

Did anyone ever get close-up pictures to you of the Herdim clamps? Is that what you were looking for?

Matthew

One person sent me a picture...but not up close...I still would like to see the three basic views (front, top and side) up clos if your able too.

For now I'm making a set of spool clamps...I found out just now that the C-bouts need a different shape or closer attention when using the spool clamps...I was'nt watching and put a small dent in the top because of the sharp rise of the arching off the edge...

Thanks

-Ernie

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I have a photocopy of that article. It was published in the early 1980s, but I don't know the exact date or issue. The title is "Improved Violin and Viola Clamps," and it was written by Louis Lionel Grand. I made three sets of clamps -- two for violin/viola and one for cello -- using and slightly modifying the instructions in the artice.

VSA Journal 6 #3 May 1983

"Improved Violin and Viola Clamps"

By Louis Lionel Grand

page 78

Thanks! ;)

If anyone is making these, I would suggest that they may want to consider making multiple sets, since the work is in the set-up of the machining, and then you have a back-up set, or perhaps a 'Mini-Me' will follow the Seniors footsteps one day ... etc.

The hardware could come later.

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If you put the clamps one near the others you should obtain a circle. What are the diameters?

Close enough will do, since you are using small segments, so just estimate what size circle will cover a Bout.

If you trace the rib outline of the Bout onto paper, and then mark off two points, and run compass arcs off those two points and see where they intersect. Should give you a good starting point.

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Close enough will do, since you are using small segments, so just estimate what size circle will cover a Bout.

If you trace the rib outline of the Bout onto paper, and then mark off two points, and run compass arcs off those two points and see where they intersect. Should give you a good starting point.

I guess it will ;) !

Thanks NewNewbie

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If you put the clamps one near the others you should obtain a circle. What are the diameters?

Below is a photograph of the diagram from the article showing how the clamp heads are cut from the sheet. The concave heads cut from the outer ring, and the convex heads are cut from the inner ring. The outer diameter of the outer ring is 8 1/4 inches; the inner diameter of the inner ring is 5 inches.

This arrangement yields enough heads for 10 concave and 10 convex clamps -- not enough concave to clamp a full-size violin plate and more convex than necessary. A full-size violin requires 20 concave, 8 convex and 4 quarter circles.

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Below is a photograph of the diagram from the article showing how the clamp heads are cut from the sheet. The concave heads cut from the outer ring, and the convex heads are cut from the inner ring. The outer diameter of the outer ring is 8 1/4 inches; the inner diameter of the inner ring is 5 inches.

This arrangement yields enough heads for 10 concave and 10 convex clamps -- not enough concave to clamp a full-size violin plate and more convex than necessary. A full-size violin requires 20 concave, 8 convex and 4 quarter circles.

Thank you Brad, those are exactly the informations I was looking for.

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I use a lot of blue painter's tape on clamps, custom clamping blocks, etc. It's disposable, and very adaptable. I'm also a sloppy gluer. dry.gif

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I use a lot of blue painter's tape on clamps, custom clamping blocks, etc. It's disposable, and very adaptable. I'm also a sloppy gluer. dry.gif

LOL tell me about it!

I've glued all sorts of things without even trying! :lol:

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Matthew

One person sent me a picture...but not up close...I still would like to see the three basic views (front, top and side) up clos if your able too.

Thanks

-Ernie

Ernie,

I was going to send this to you in a personal message, but then I thought maybe others want to see them too. These are both the cello and violin/viola Herdim clamps. Blue is for the upper and lower bouts, yellow for the C-bouts, and red for the corners. The material for the clamps is somewhat giving but not too much. Glue doesn't seem to stick to them. The cello clamps do use hard plastic (the black part) but the parts that touch the instrument is the forgiving type of material that the violin/viola ones are made of.

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Incidentally, for those who use the broom-handle jobs, the screwing and unscrewing can be made infinitely less tedious by replacing wing-nuts with round nuts as shown in the photo of the Herdim clamps.

The torque generated by a wing-nut is not required for this operation.

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Matthew

Excellent photos...I will archive these for sure...now seeing them up close...I don't think I could even come close to making a set...I would rather save up and have the real McCoy

Thanks again for the great shots of these awesome clamps

-Ernie

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Very nice photos, indeed, Matthew. One point is that corpus clamps should not mar the plate and fit tightly adjacent to other clamps. I am not interested in R&D'ing clamp development. That's why I bought the Herdim clams. I purchased them over time much like a coin collector trying to complete a collection. I am not sorry.

Clamps are fine tools like any knife or gouge.

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Clamps are fine tools like any knife or gouge.

The Herdim clamps are uni-taskers - nothing like the versatility of knives and gouges.

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The Herdim clamps are uni-taskers - nothing like the versatility of knives and gouges.

Disagreement here,

I use mine as an aid in varnishing, also to support instruments while setting up and some repair work calls for audacious use of those babies.

There are more uses to come, for sure... (I have already made my money back, as Jeffrey said earlier... )

It is all good with them!!

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Matthew

Excellent photos...I will archive these for sure...now seeing them up close...I don't think I could even come close to making a set...I would rather save up and have the real McCoy

Thanks again for the great shots of these awesome clamps

-Ernie

My pleasure. I'm glad it was useful.

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