Sign in to follow this  
lpr5184

Peghole Reamer and Shaper...

Recommended Posts

lpr5184   

I'm going to purchase a new Peghole Reamer and matching shaper...since a good set will cost around $200.00 I want to make sure I'm choosing the right one. What are the differences between a regular and spiral reamer and which do you prefer?

Also I noticed a standard 1/30 taper reamer and a 1/20 taper reamer...I'm guessing I need the standard but would like to know if anyone uses the 1/20 and why...

Thank you...

-Ernie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MANFIO   

I use the standart (non spiral) type.

The spiral type may work faster but I think that it is not a good thing when you have to make some small corrections while working with the tool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to purchase a new Peghole Reamer and matching shaper...since a good set will cost around $200.00 I want to make sure I'm choosing the right one. What are the differences between a regular and spiral reamer and which do you prefer?

Also I noticed a standard 1/30 taper reamer and a 1/20 taper reamer...I'm guessing I need the standard but would like to know if anyone uses the 1/20 and why...

Thank you...

-Ernie

I enjoy my spiral reamer.. I've heard that because of the shear type of cut they tend to leave a finer surface. the straight I've heard are good when you need to tweak a hole into allignment...Is the one in twenty for cello endpins?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ernie,

A spiral reamers blades will meet the wood to be cut at an angle reducing the chance for chatter IMO generally resulting in a smoother cut than a standard reamers whose blades which meet the grain head on. Great results can be had with either. I go back and forth between using both styles. With a standard reamer I have found that I can adjust the angle of the hole by "muscling" the reamer one way or another (then finishing up with a spiral), I have not had similar luck with just a spiral doing that. The spiral really shines for me in making sure the hole is in round.

I've never had an opportunity to use a 1/20 taper reamer, if the pegs are at an unusual taper and not working, I usually suggest that they be replaced.

Jerry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a 3 flute reamer that cuts a very smooth, round hole. The peg shaver was given to me, and it outperforms various other ones I bought over the years. It's a considerable investment, but it does a fine job, even on gnarly twisted grain pegs.

http://www.aehnelt-tools.com/shop/product_info.php?cPath=680_681_692&products_id=29587&osCsid=udwcpmkmjjlkytr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alberti Tools make good shapers. It isn't necessary to buy the whole set unless you are working on fractionals. Their website is www.violintools.com. They make a bunch of other cool stuff too. For full size violins, He suggests buying the 3-4 and the 5-6 shaper. I think the 3 hole is a little too small but sometimes 4 is appropriate. Pegs finished on the 5 hole usually look just right to me. You may not need the 3-4 shaper. The shapers are set to a 1:30 taper I believe. He also sells the reamer too, but it's just the same one from Metropolitan Music (which works just fine. It's one of many reamers we have on hand.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
iburkard   

I have a decent adjustable shaver and it works well... have to sharpen the blade every now and then. I like knowing that I can support modern and older style peg tapers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don Noon   

My straight reamer works fine, but it's the only thing I've ever used, so I can't offer any real advice.

I have an adjustable peg shaver that worked marginally; I had jeweler's lathe sitting around, so I set that up to cut pegs... much better, but I'm not sure this helps you much, either. Oh, well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MikeC   

I have an adjustable peg shaver that works real well since I sharpened the blade. I was thinking of getting one of those spiral reamers that I see on ebay even those are kind of price for me right now but do you think those are any good?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Adjustable shaper works fine for me. I have used it at primarily for 1:30 and it has been also useful on a few older instruments with a steeper peg angle in which I wanted to keep the original peg angle if the holes did not have to be re-re-amed. Also use a straight standard reamer.

Adjustable shaper needs to be sharp and only about 1/2 of the peg length should be started in the shaper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Geoff-UK   

My violin reamer is a spiral and my cello is a standard cut. Much prefer the spiral type.

Make your own peg shavers - quick and easy to do and you can make them to size that suits your needs.

Add some adjustment screws.

flickr - shavers

Geoff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It should probably be noted that with the adjustable shaver, it can be a somewhat tedious task getting the taper to match your reamer exactly. On the other hand, the fact that it is adjustable means that it can be adjusted to match an existing taper that isn't what your reamer is - which is an occasional advantage.

Expect to have to (occasionally) tinker with it a bit getting it to work well.

I believe that there is a guide for setting one up somewhere online. I forget exactly where, but it's pretty accurate IIRC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's probably worth clarifying which adjustable peg shaver we're talking about. I think most of the comments above refer to the (relatively) inexpensive American made one. I have one that I've had for ages, and while setting it up to work is pretty tedious, it can actually work quite well. I think the guide Craig is referring to was mentioned in a post here some time ago.

The other adjustable shaver I've used is the one by Herdim. It's quite a bit more expensive than the American one, but it's quite easy to adjust. I've had very good results with it as long as I make sure the large knob on top is quite tight. Almost any time I start to get chatter I tighten that a bit and the problem goes away.

EDIT: I just looked up the thread about the adjustable shaver set up guide, here. Unfortunately the site with the instructions is apparently no longer there. The Wayback Machine has an archived version here, but unfortunately the pictures seem not to have been archived.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peg Shaver Adjustments.pdf

Hopefully I'm not violating any copyright laws by posting this here. I saved this sometime ago as it is very useful information.

Edit: I don't know what is up with this file uploader on this forum. Nothing but a hassle every time when trying to upload an attachment.

Peg Shaver Adjustments.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alberti Tools make good shapers. It isn't necessary to buy the whole set unless you are working on fractionals. Their website is www.violintools.com. They make a bunch of other cool stuff too. For full size violins, He suggests buying the 3-4 and the 5-6 shaper. I think the 3 hole is a little too small but sometimes 4 is appropriate. Pegs finished on the 5 hole usually look just right to me. You may not need the 3-4 shaper. The shapers are set to a 1:30 taper I believe. He also sells the reamer too, but it's just the same one from Metropolitan Music (which works just fine. It's one of many reamers we have on hand.)

The Alberti shavers are by far the best I have ever used, without a lot of tweaking and fine-tuning, if you can get them. Supply has been spotty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MikeC   

Peg Shaver Adjustments.pdf

Hopefully I'm not violating any copyright laws by posting this here. I saved this sometime ago as it is very useful information.

Edit: I don't know what is up with this file uploader on this forum. Nothing but a hassle every time when trying to upload an attachment.

That is the peg shaver I have and with a little practice got good at adjusting it. I'll describe how I do it... the reamer will be used to set the adjustment so first remove the blade so it's edge doesn't get dulled by contact with the reamer.

Loosen the clamp holder screws (fig. 1) also loosen the adj screw (fig. 6). Place your reamer in the slot under the clamp and screw the big knob on top so it clamps down on the reamer. By doing it this way you automatically get the V groove aligned with the center line of the reamer and at the same time the angle of the clamp is right so then with it clamped into place like that just tighten all the set screws. Then open the clamp, remove the reamer and put the blade back on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is the peg shaver I have and with a little practice got good at adjusting it. I'll describe how I do it... the reamer will be used to set the adjustment so first remove the blade so it's edge doesn't get dulled by contact with the reamer.

Loosen the clamp holder screws (fig. 1) also loosen the adj screw (fig. 6). Place your reamer in the slot under the clamp and screw the big knob on top so it clamps down on the reamer. By doing it this way you automatically get the V groove aligned with the center line of the reamer and at the same time the angle of the clamp is right so then with it clamped into place like that just tighten all the set screws. Then open the clamp, remove the reamer and put the blade back on.

would a strip of tape protect the edges while adjusting the shaver?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lpr5184   

Thanks for all the input...it's a tossup between the Herdim and Aehnelt sets...the Alberti tools look extremely nice too...after looking at the Alberti "Peg Skiver"...I'm now questioning how others handle this chore when shaping a peg...it's a great tool but their must be a less expensive way...

http://violintools.com/pegskiver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can cut around the collar with a sharp knife to prevent chipping. My peg shaver leaves a fine enough finish that skiving isn't required.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lpr5184   

You can cut around the collar with a sharp knife to prevent chipping. My peg shaver leaves a fine enough finish that skiving isn't required.

OK Thanks Bill...from what I read abut the tool it sounded to me like after shaving the peg the remaining step must also be blended down to the collar...am I way off here?

BTW...Is your shaver also an Aehnelt?

-Ernie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the reasons I like using an adjustable shaver on old instruments is that I never have to "skive" the pegs. It's easy to get them to exactly the size they need to be. On new instruments I find it easiest to shave all the pegs first, either using a non-adjustable shaver or by using an adjustable one and reaming the pegs to fit a reamed hole the size I want to end up, and then ream the holes to fit the pegs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MikeC   

would a strip of tape protect the edges while adjusting the shaver?

Good idea. See I can't think of everything! LOL

So what exactly is skiving? And why do you skive a peg after it is shaped in a peg shaver?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lpr5184   

So what exactly is skiving? And why do you skive a peg after it is shaped in a peg shaver?

Thanks Mike that's what I was trying to ask!

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.