Help ID'ing Violin Supposedly a Michael Boller


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I mentioned the neck graft in relation to possible stock numbers which are present on both Hills and most Beares grafted instruments. Don’t know about Joe Blogs though.

I though it relevant which is why I mentioned it, but whether the information on those numbers is necessarily retrievable or available is a different matter.

Oh sorry, I see, I get your point:

I have just always found it frustrating to go into exhaustive correspondence, just to find out that the workshop foreman somewhere or somewhere else, noted in the ‘30’s “A violin labeled Boller”, since the Hills and Beares were no more bothered about violins in this price range then, than they are now. I find it much more profitable to try and work it out from the bits that I presume are still original.

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Regarding Labels: (Please forgive me, Skiingfiddler, if I slightly contradict you) It is important to know that the 19th century Markneukirchen wholesalers also supplied octavo leave

I like the look of this violin - it seems to be of that era or mor like early 19th century, it's very nicely made and the neck graft is very well done. It's just a matter of price - you can find a bea

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"To check if it is from Mittenwald, I would look for....."

What about those pins on the top and bottom of the top plates? Whenever I see those I think southern Germany or Austria. A bad assumption? (This "Boller" may not be pinned in that fashion. I'm just wondering in general.)

Richard

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"To check if it is from Mittenwald, I would look for....."

What about those pins on the top and bottom of the top plates? Whenever I see those I think southern Germany or Austria. A bad assumption? (This "Boller" may not be pinned in that fashion. I'm just wondering in general.)

Richard

I'm sorry, but I can only see a pin through the button, which is surely a repair. I'm afraid I don't have pins of any sort on my Mittenwald checklist, although I obviously havn't noticed everything, since Martin has caught me out for not noticing the "wrong" spelling once in this thread already.

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Jacob,

Where do you stand in relation to the so-called "Mittenwald notch" as seen on the bottom rib of this violin? I was taught that this was a valuable aid to identification, but since I got into maestronet I am questioning everything.

By the way, clocked your caveat about early German spelling, you ARE the man!

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Jacob,

Where do you stand in relation to the so-called "Mittenwald notch" as seen on the bottom rib of this violin? I was taught that this was a valuable aid to identification, but since I got into maestronet I am questioning everything.

By the way, clocked your caveat about early German spelling, you ARE the man!

Dear Martin,

The Mittenwald "notch" is a matter of fact. If you see it, you can start thinking about Mittenwald. The problem is

that you find "Mittenwald notches" elsewhere too (Vienna, Preßburg, Krems for instance), you should tell me if there are scottish "Mittenwald notches" too. Therefore a "Mittenwald notch" is only an invitation to check out for other Mittenwald features and not foolproof evidence that it must come from Mittenwald. The other problem is that these "notches" often disapear when it is neccesary to shorten the bottom rib.

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OK that makes a lot of sense.

I haven't spotted any Scottish Mittenwald notches (except of course on Thomas Craig's High Class Violins, some of which were made in Mittenwald!). One piece bottom ribs aren't uncommon in late 19th century Scottish work ... but notchless. I think your typical Scottish maker just took a nip of whisky for courage and stabbed a bradawl in the general direction of the endpin.

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Great, will look forward to that:

(Does it have a mittenwald "notch"?)

No "Mittenwald" notch . But I've never thought the notch was much more than determining the centre of a one piece rib (as I suspect you do), probably more common on violins then cellos.

The bottom ribs on this William Smith cello are joined at the bottom, and as you pointed out, notches can easily disappear and a joint can appear, when bulging or deformed ribs require shortening. In the W.Smith case, the ribs where always separate pieces.

Sorry Flying fiddler, it looks like we've hijacked your thread...

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IMG_0735-Copy.jpg

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