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Craig Tucker

My favorite Maestronet trick

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One of the biggest reasons why I like posting here, is that I find, amidst all of my (limited) experience, learned and adopted methods, sometimes I miss the simplest most effective fix that may be obvious and routine for someone else.

This trick for removing sticky frog slides, has become my favorite "trick".

I recently asked the question here and, I cannot (due to my rapidly aging brain...) remember who suggested this remedy, but; my undying gratitude for provding this information.

If there is the slightest resistance to the slide wanting to come out, I make one of these sticks and it always works like a charm, as promised...

Would anyeone else care to post their favorite MN trick here?

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Whoa! I'm having exactly that problem. Thanks!!! Leather jaw pads?

Only trick I have posted on MN... dental floss to open up tricky glue seams. Will leave a wax residue, though.

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Whoa! I'm having exactly that problem. Thanks!!! Leather jaw pads?

Yes. In fact I removed the knurled steel inserts, replaced them with a softwood face, and faced those with a thick leather - unfinished side facing out.

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Here is something I like to do with dental floss. I double it and lay it across the purfling grove when fitting my purfling, I can push the purfling down into the grove and get it back out by lifting up on the dental floss. Dental floss is strong and very thin. It doesn't leave any marks. Works great.

Berl

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Thats a great trick Berl.I just purfled a back(including button area)and broke enough wood purfling for two violins!My frustration would have been less with your trick.Keep the tricks coming gents,I keep my laptop on the bench sometimes!Yes,there is still the front to do...Cheers J.A.

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One of the biggest reasons why I like posting here, is that I find, amidst all of my (limited) experience, learned and adopted methods, sometimes I miss the simplest most effective fix that may be obvious and routine for someone else.

This trick for removing sticky frog slides, has become my favorite "trick".

I recently asked the question here and, I cannot (due to my rapidly aging brain...) remember who suggested this remedy, but; my undying gratitude for provding this information.

If there is the slightest resistance to the slide wanting to come out, I make one of these sticks and it always works like a charm, as promised...

Would anyeone else care to post their favorite MN trick here?

Hi ct,

What is the white material that you have attached to the end of the stick. Some form of double sided tape?

Tony

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Would anyeone else care to post their favorite MN trick here?

Not really a trick: Casein/Ammonia. Thanks to John Masters for the tip on this interesting stuff that I use for a few things.

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Hi ct,

What is the white material that you have attached to the end of the stick. Some form of double sided tape?

Tony

Exactly.

Trim it to shape, then remove the backing from the face, and stick it to the slide.

When I start tapping the stick (a coffee stir stick with the rounded edges removed) with the hammer, I will press it to the slide firmly while I tap, - the slide gives up pretty quickly.

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Here is something I like to do with dental floss. I double it and lay it across the purfling grove when fitting my purfling, I can push the purfling down into the grove and get it back out by lifting up on the dental floss. Dental floss is strong and very thin. It doesn't leave any marks. Works great.

Berl

Yes, this is a cool trick -simple - effective. I have broken many pieces of purfling trying to get it back out of the groove after a test fit...

Thanks!

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My favorite is probably Michael Darnton's suggestion to apply glycerin to wood purfling. Prior to that it took twice as much purfling as it should, because I don't like to make splices. Makes up for some of the other ideas that didn't work so well.

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I think that the one thing I use more than anything else I picked up on maestronet is the neck pull-back maneuver that I now use in most situations where I used to fit fingerboard shims. In second place would be spiral maple bushings, which I just recently have been experimenting with to the point that I think I can now do them.

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Exactly.

Trim it to shape, then remove the backing from the face, and stick it to the slide.

When I start tapping the stick (a coffee stir stick with the rounded edges removed) with the hammer, I will press it to the slide firmly while I tap, - the slide gives up pretty quickly.

It looks a lot thicker than the double sided carpet tape that I have seen. Is there a layer of foam between the two sticky surfaces?

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I love doublesided tape - mine is only a layer of glue really. No foam layer at all.

I stick thin pieces of wood to a sheet of thick perspex, stick two thicker sticks at either side as a fence, then use a plunge router to thickness my strips very accurately and safely. Then just slide a knife under the veneers and rub the glue off.

Also use doublesided tape to stick a backing block to my blades when lapping. Much easier when you have something to hold onto.

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It looks a lot thicker than the double sided carpet tape that I have seen. Is there a layer of foam between the two sticky surfaces?

Yes.

I only have the roll, not the package, so I cannot check the package, but if I remember correctly it is a 3M product.

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First off, this thread is a good idea. What would make it great is if everyone could post a link to the specific thread in question they found helpful. If you don't have it, perhaps the original poster's name could help with a search. If that fails, maybe you could sum up the "trick" in a few steps for us newbies.

I'm desperately interested in the "neck pull-back maneuver" and the "Glycerine Purfling" tips. :(

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...I'm desperately interested in the "neck pull-back maneuver"...

Though this has come up many times in the past, I'll go through it again for you. The neck pull back is used, rather than doing a fingerboard shim or a neck reset, to raise a fingerboard projection that is too low.

1. Open the seam between the top and the ribs (and the upper block) from one upper corner all the way around to the other upper corner. Now the neck can be pulled back, raising the fingerboard projection, because there is some flexibility in the back/block/rib structure with the top seam released. (The neck remains glued to the back and the upper block.) Note that when you pull the neck back a gap will open up under the fingerboard between the end grain of the neck and the end grain of the top.

2. Fit a shim under the fingerboard in the gap between the end grain of the neck and the end grain of the top. The thickness of the shim should be whatever is required to fill the gap when the fingerboard is raided the desired amount. I start with a too-thick shim that raises the projection too much and gradually plane the shim thinner until it is the right thickness. It is slightly awkward to work under the fingerboard, but with the right tweezers and probing tools the shim can be inserted and removed.

3. Once the proper shim is in place, reglue the top to the ribs and the upper block.

The fingerboard projection is now higher. Also, there is now less top edge overhanging the ribs at the neck, so this proceedure might not be appropriate if there were too little edge overhang at the neck originally.

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wow! where to begin,,, maybe ..not getting to hung up on varnish ..CT or the cut and paste scroll carving with Manfio.Or my end through vice -cradle via Master burgess, or, how about Karen Rost purfling ...thanks toErnie martel..and the couradge to use it from Mr.Bruce Carlson...Michael Dartons site and the El Tatoo is a deffinate favorate as well well as his geometric layout of ff's ..... all the folks who said just do it on the DGU short stop. Michael Molnar's dental pummice give away. Joe's Varnish. Soundpost setter sharpening set me straight. the little L shape wood pieces for indexing fingerboards and bridge carving. New Newbee and David showed me that sometimes just having a good laugh once in a while might not exactly fix the problem but it can help put things in perspective. Jefferry thanks for all your hard work. now I'm sure I forgot something ..... now to decide my favorate???? thanks all.....

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wow! where to begin,,, maybe ..not getting to hung up on varnish ..CT or the cut and paste scroll carving with Manfio.Or my end through vice -cradle via Master burgess, or, how about Karen Rost purfling ...thanks toErnie martel..and the couradge to use it from Mr.Bruce Carlson...Michael Dartons site and the El Tatoo is a deffinate favorate as well well as his geometric layout of ff's ..... all the folks who said just do it on the DGU short stop. Michael Molnar's dental pummice give away. Joe's Varnish. Soundpost setter sharpening set me straight. the little L shape wood pieces for indexing fingerboards and bridge carving. New Newbee and David showed me that sometimes just having a good laugh once in a while might not exactly fix the problem but it can help put things in perspective. Jefferry thanks for all your hard work. now I'm sure I forgot something ..... now to decide my favorate???? thanks all.....

Yeah, that goes for me too.

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Favorite trick? Posting on MN when I can't figure out what went wrong, or can't figure out what to do next. cool.gif

Priceless resource. Thanks!

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My favorite trick....I cant remember who suggested it.. but adding clean glass marbles to an opened jar of varnish to eliminate air. It works and has saved me lots of dollars from not having varnish solidify in the jar.

I agree with Addie... MN is a priceless resource and a big "thank you' to all who contribute with their time and expertise.

Tony

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OK, CT, used your trick, and it worked fine... except I had to do it twice. First for the MoP, and second for the liner. laugh.gif Old glue!

P.S. 3M Foam Tape, or Scotch Mounting Tape.

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P.S. 3M Foam Tape, or Scotch Mounting Tape.

Double-Sided Turning Tape

This is the non foam type, and you can see that it is used for lathe work that can put some huge loads on the tape.

Can be used to also hold down ribs or purfling during thickness operations.

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Not really a trick: Casein/Ammonia. Thanks to John Masters for the tip on this interesting stuff that I use for a few things.

Don,

Care to elaborate on what things you use the casein/ammonia for?

Thanks in advance.

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I'm desperately interested in the "neck pull-back maneuver" and the "Glycerine Purfling" tips. :(

Jeremy,

As I said, the glycerin was Michael Darnton's tip. Haven't had time to hunt the thread and thought he might jump in, but essentially you dampen the purfling with 5% to 10% glycerin before trying to bend it. I haven't perfected the technique but the last purfling I did (because I no longer know where to get decent fiber purfling) worked pretty well with 10% glycerin. Before that I would break as many pieces of wood purfling as I bent successfully, and I only splice purfling as a last resort.

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