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Effects of Humidity and Temperature on Impact Hammer Measurements


scordatura

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I am going to keep records of impact spectra. I want to have an idea how the temp and humidity effect things. Right now my workshop is in my basement which can get pretty humid during summer even with a dehumidifier. Also reading the strad letter about the effect of humidity in the ct scans regarding density reminded me about it. After all if you are going to take the trouble to measure things why not go all of the way.

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... After all if you are going to take the trouble to measure things why not go all of the way.

...'cuz it's a lot of work.

My goal is to dumb down the measurements to the quickest, fastest things that obtain "good enough" data, from a maker standpoint. Not good enough for research or scientific papers, and it's difficult at this point to say what "good enough" is for making. For a lot of makers, "good enough" = not measuring much at all.

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...'cuz it's a lot of work.

Not really much work to write down the RH whenever the weight or anything is measured. But there is a time lag between RH and moisture contant in the wood. So if the environemnt is not controlled, a good MC meter would be better. Do anyone know of a non contact meter that work well for thin violin plates or say a neck and does not cost the white out of our eyes?

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My goal is to dumb down the measurements to the quickest, fastest things that obtain "good enough" data, from a maker standpoint. Not good enough for research or scientific papers, and it's difficult at this point to say what "good enough" is for making. For a lot of makers, "good enough" = not measuring much at all.

I put the level of 'good enough' at the level where humidity and temperature fluctations make the measurements difficult to do. My feeling is that if you are trying to measure something on a violin that has a smaller effect than temperature and humidity then, from a violinmaking point of view, it isn't very important. There are plenty of large effects to look at so I'd rather worry about those first.

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Effects related to moisture content in the wood are:

1. Dimensions: creep or swelling. The wood swell/creep different in the radial, tangential and longitudinal directions.

2. The elastic constants depend on MC and thus the tap tones and the resonances of the assembled violin.

3. The woods ability to withstand deformations

4. Weights and densities. The measurement uncertainity will be in the second digit if not the RH is taken into account.

Humidity effects are utterly important if your instrument will be sent to or will experience a different climate. E.g. the fingerboard projection depend on the MC of the wood.

Temperature effects are less important and very weak, but temperature affect the RH in the air.

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