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Copying


Tets Kimura

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And then there are those who are REALLY good at this

Marco Coppriardi for one.

I understand that Luiz Bellini is, but I have not seen his work.

on we go,

Joe

I spent an afternoon with bellini yesterday. It was awesome. He had just finished a Lord Wilton copy. That violin was awesome. After a few decades wear and tear it might come closer to the original as the varnish had a newness to it. For a violin only five days old the violin was great sounding.

For a 75 year old man he is still passionate and loving his work. The amount of detail in his copy was astounding. He was pretty open about some of his techniques.

It was also fascinating hearing stories about sacconi, wurlitzers and francais. Hearing him talk about milstein, heifetz, szeryng, etc was also fun. I should put a post up about my visit. I felt privileged to have shared an afternoon with him.

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I spent an afternoon with bellini yesterday. It was awesome. He had just finished a Lord Wilton copy. That violin was awesome. After a few decades wear and tear it might come closer to the original as the varnish had a newness to it. For a violin only five days old the violin was great sounding.

For a 75 year old man he is still passionate and loving his work. The amount of detail in his copy was astounding. He was pretty open about some of his techniques.

It was also fascinating hearing stories about sacconi, wurlitzers and francais. Hearing him talk about milstein, heifetz, szeryng, etc was also fun. I should put a post up about my visit. I felt privileged to have shared an afternoon with him.

Definitely a privilege. We look forward to the details!

Joe

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It was also fascinating hearing stories about sacconi, wurlitzers and francais. Hearing him talk about milstein, heifetz, szeryng, etc was also fun. I should put a post up about my visit. I felt privileged to have shared an afternoon with him.

I think the Wurlitzer shop will have a permanent place as one of the "Camelots" of our business.

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I think the Wurlitzer shop will have a permanent place as one of the "Camelots" of our business.

He said that the early years of Wurlitzer were indeed a great atmosphere to work. It sounded like Sacconi took Bellini under his wing. What is interesting that under that roof there were many big personalities that under different conditions would have suffered from too many cooks in the kitchen. Somehow it worked, probably never again to be dupicated.

Bellini said that he had a chance to spend some extended time with the Lord Wilton Guarneri. I think he said that it had a strange bass bar in it. That lead to his conversion from a Strad man to one who appreciated the Guarneris. He showed me the photographs that he works from given to him by Pollens. We compared those to the Biddulph del Gesu book and the color was not accurate in the book. This was due to the lack of proper color correction by the printer.

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One thing I don't like about "in the style of" is that you wind up with a product so stereotyped it is not really representative of the original craftsman's work. Every Guarneri copy I have seen has his "penultimate" 'f' holes, never the Straddy (Amati-esque) ones. Same with all the other details. Why bother with the Guarneri name, just call it a low arch model. Making a true copy makes you stare at all the minute details... details you might not notice otherwise. No, you can't match the wood grain, and it won't sound 300 years old, unless you try that fungus thing. :lol: But still worthwhile. Copying, that is.

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One thing I don't like about "in the style of" is that you wind up with a product so stereotyped it is not really representative of the original craftsman's work. Every Guarneri copy I have seen has his "penultimate" 'f' holes, never the Straddy (Amati-esque) ones. Same with all the other details. Why bother with the Guarneri name, just call it a low arch model. Making a true copy makes you stare at all the minute details... details you might not notice otherwise. No, you can't match the wood grain, and it won't sound 300 years old, unless you try that fungus thing. :lol: But still worthwhile. Copying, that is.

Nevermind.

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I guess you're entitled to at least one "AAAACCCKKK!" launched at me, although mine was aimed at the kerosene, not you. :lol:

I would do that test, BTW, but I don't have any kerosene. I am happy to test turpentine (artist's and hardware store), and mineral spirits. You'll do the kerosene test, and we post unbiased results.

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I guess you're entitled to at least one "AAAACCCKKK!" launched at me, although mine was aimed at the kerosene, not you. :lol:

I would do that test, BTW, but I don't have any kerosene. I am happy to test turpentine (artist's and hardware store), and mineral spirits. You'll do the kerosene test, and we post unbiased results.

Addie,

I edited my original post, which I decided was not something I really wanted to pursue - "nevermind" is not anything directed against you, it is simply a means to not leave a blank post.

FWIW, I haven't seen anything by you directed against me here, either.

Fair enough?

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