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Violin Making Gouges


Eti

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You'll need surprisingly few.

Think of a "hogging" gouge for main plate excavation... a #3 sweep with 1 to 1.5 inch width works nicely for me.

Then a gouge for profiling the "trough" in which the purfling sits. This can vary based on how steep a sweep you choose and how you want the edge profile to look... a 1/2 to 5/8 inch with a #3 - #5 sweep works for me.

The scroll is where the tools start to "pile up," although you can use the ones previously mentioned in an austerity kit and add some very small gouges for the final turns of the scroll. http://www.texaswoodcarvers.com/Tool_Catalog/Ramelson_Gouges.htm

Better to choose fewer gouges, with premium quality steel. They're a joy to work with and hold an edge much better than the cheap stuff.

Best regards,

E

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I have three straight gouges 22 mm, 10 mm and 8 mm. I've used an 4-1/2 angle grinder

with 24 grit for hogging material. I drill depth holes and grind till holes are divots.

It takes a steady hand and judgement. :*I Stop and "gear down" when you get close.

I use gouges to finish tight areas and switch to planes and scrapers.

Saves edges on tools and my joints.

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Once again the rich MN archive is being ignored...sad (even with a crap search engine - it's not too bad with practice).

Great point. It seems we do get into a lot of repeats. I must confess, I find it easier to ask a question than to search the archives.

I wonder if we should get a group together to start an organized library of MN topics. First we need the topic subjects of interest. Then build a tree of subtopics.

Stay Tuned.

Mike

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Indeed, this baby is a good friend when hogging out cello archings... and very capable of quick $(*%&$(%# manouvers...

http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=42528&cat=2,42524,42527

I've gone through all of these type carvers. Not worth the trouble IMHO. Working with a scrub plane, sharp gouge and mallet is faster, safer, quieter and lots more fun.

Oded

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Indeed, this baby is a good friend when hogging out cello archings... and very capable of quick $(*%&$(%# manouvers...

http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=42528&cat=2,42524,42527

I tied that sucker in a speed contest, hogging out the inside of a cello top. Add cleanup time for the power tool, which blew debris all over the room, and the patch which needed to be added to correct a boo-boo with the power tool, and the hand method was a clear winner. I'd lose on a cello back, but not by much.

Today I hogged out the insides of two violin tops and two backs with my big hand gouge. Both (two) tops took under ten minutes, and both backs were under fifteen.

Didn't even work up a sweat, but still used it as an excuse to take a day off at the gym. :)

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I tied that sucker in a speed contest, hogging out the inside of a cello top. Add cleanup time for the power tool, which blew debris all over the room, and the patch which needed to be added to correct a boo-boo with the power tool, and the hand method was a clear winner. I'd lose on a cello back, but not by much.

Today I hogged out the insides of two violin tops and two backs with my big hand gouge. Both (two) tops took under ten minutes, and both backs were under fifteen.

Didn't even work up a sweat, but used it as an excuse to take a day off at the gym. :)

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David: You've sculpted a lot more cello plates than I... and for the few I've done I agree with gouges for the top plate... it's so soft a power tool really robs you of the joy of peeling it back with a sharp edge.

The maple, by contrast, had me losing joy real fast. And with no apprentices around to abuse I started looking for help... the chainsaw doo=hicky isn't God's answer, but it saves a lot of grunting, provided you don't have to spend time adding patches :)

I'd love to see you in cage match against it...

E

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I don't know how much time it would save on a violin, but I have used the chain saw blade on an angle grinder to carve an archtop guitar back out of curly maple. The trick to using it, as Tom Ribbeke said, is to use it like you are petting a Doberman. You want to be nice and gentle, and very careful.

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Great point. It seems we do get into a lot of repeats. I must confess, I find it easier to ask a question than to search the archives.

I wonder if we should get a group together to start an organized library of MN topics. First we need the topic subjects of interest. Then build a tree of subtopics.

Stay Tuned.

Mike

The library of sub topics is an excellent idea. I usually use Google, and adding the word Maestronet after the search terms; ironically this seems to work far better than the forum search dysfunction.

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I made a wooden plane for roughing and it worked great, but the bottom was wearing out and the blade needed adjusting every 5 minutes. I got a spoon bottom Lie-Neilson plane for Christmas (well it was back ordered... but they shipped it yesterday!), and the dimensions (radii, width, length) are exactly the same as the one I made that was perfect. I still use the blade as one of my favorite scrapers. Should be great.

Ken

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  • 1 year later...

I have 94 gouges and use 6 to make a fiddle. I know, I have a problem.

My wooden scrub plane for hollowing out plates is undoubtedly my second love in life.

I tried that carving thingy and agree with those before, takes the fun away and didn't do the job quicker!!

Jose,

 

Can you post a pic of your scrub plane?

 

Thanks

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I tied that sucker in a speed contest, hogging out the inside of a cello top. Add cleanup time for the power tool, which blew debris all over the room, and the patch which needed to be added to correct a boo-boo with the power tool, and the hand method was a clear winner. I'd lose on a cello back, but not by much.

Today I hogged out the insides of two violin tops and two backs with my big hand gouge. Both (two) tops took under ten minutes, and both backs were under fifteen.

Didn't even work up a sweat, but still used it as an excuse to take a day off at the gym. smile.gif

what is the sweep and width of the gouge you are using , thanks . kevin

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