How do you sharpen peg reamers?


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Someplace I remember reading about someone who used a stone to sharpen the flute edges, might have been Michael Darnton, but I can only imagine this as being a tedious process. I know people have rejuvenated files by dipping in acid for a short while to eat away the dulling burrs on the cutting edges. Perhaps someone else who has more experience will have something more to add.

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I think that was probably me. I've since decided that the gain is minimal, and there always seems to be a use around the shop for a reamer that doesn't quite work, so now I buy new ones. My first, worst one still works fine (better than a new one, in fact) for violin end pins, and then there are still various jobs like enlarging holes in aluminum, or as a punch for trying to beat stuck pegs out backwards. :-)

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They should be not to difficult to get reground professionally ,tapered reamers should have years of use unlike straight engineering reamers which are useless if the diameter is reduced. A professional regrind would probably work but in my experience if it is only one reamer they are liable to be expensive . It would be preferable to get together with other makers and send in a whole bunch .

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We found a machine shop to sharpen cello peg, cello endpin and bass endpin reamers. The results were pretty good. We tried to have them sharpen violin reamers and the results were less than desireable. So, we bought new ones. Plenty of uses for a dull reamer.

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Buying a new reamer might be the best approach if you factor in all the costs against how many pegs a new reamer will do, versus a lot of time and the cost of resharpening.

Should be in the pennies to do a peg. Why pennies are thrown away by people.

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They should be not to difficult to get reground professionally ,tapered reamers should have years of use unlike straight engineering reamers which are useless if the diameter is reduced. A professional regrind would probably work but in my experience if it is only one reamer they are liable to be expensive . It would be preferable to get together with other makers and send in a whole bunch .

That's the major issue. In the Weisshaar shop, we had some reamers reground, and they worked fine. I never got the final numbers, but the ambiance indicated that it would have been cheaper to buy new ones.

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I have a diamond embedded sharpening tool that is thin enought to slide along the inside of the fluted to but a new edge on it, I wouldn't want to touch the outside of the reamer as it would change the shape, I would emagin a set of slip stones would also do the job, I will find it and photograph it and get more info in a later post - off to take my older girl to ice skating practice.

i find that I can keep a nice edge on the cutting edges with the tool.

reese

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I've never sharpened my reamer. After looking at it closely I think that it could be sharpened with a small rectangular diamond sharpening steel, the kind sold for pocket knives. I would run the diamond steel down the inside of each cutter maybe two to three times each. I would then strop around the diameter in the direction away from the edge with tripoli compound charged leather, the back of a linoleum scrap also works well for a strop. My reamer has three strait sharpened cutters on half of its diameter.

Scott

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I have never sharpened reamers before, but I have sharpened router bits and they seem to be similar.

"You’re

only going to work on the flat radial

face of each flute, so there’s no fancy

fingerwork required. (You don’t

want to work on the outside edge

of the flute, of course, because that

would alter its diameter or profile

quite quickly.) It’s fairly important

to sharpen uniformly so the bit will

remain balanced and cut smoothly.

Rather than working on one flute

until it’s sharp, and then doing Lord

knows what to the other flute, you can

insure an even job simply by giving

one flute five or ten strokes, rotating

the bit and giving the next flute the

same number of strokes, then back to

the first, and so on. Lay the diamond

paddle or needle file on the flat face

of the flute, holding it lightly so you

can feel it staying flat, and have at it."

sharpeningrouterbits.pdf

Another shop trick in woodworking is to have 2 of the same tools and use the one for the rough work and the other really sharp one for the finishing work.

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  • 3 years later...

Proto Cutter Inc. in Freeport, IL sharpens all kinds of reamers, straight and spiral fluted. That is how they got their start. I believe they also make reamers now.

 

I've had 2 bass endpin reamers and 2 cello endpin reamers sharpened for under $100 each.  Came back much sharper than they originally were. Not sure the price for violin reamers.

 

Dorian

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Quorn Universal Tool and Cutter Grinder

http://www.martinmodel.com/MMPtools.html

My colleague has a machinist lathe and mill and is making one of these for fun. It's able to sharpen reamers nicely, including spiral ones. Plus it does a bunch of other useful stuff. He's thinks he'll get it donee in the next couple of years. Not necessarily the most efficient solution time wise, but if you are the do it yourself type and you like machining things....

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I've had success using small grinding discs in a "Dremel" type tool. I mount the rotary tool positioned in a way that allows me to hand hold the reamer and clearly see where I'm grinding, on the flat radial face as Dburns said, and keeping the grinding action rolling off of the cutting edge, and not into it. I also use "rubberized abrasive discs," which cut with surprising efficiency, in that same rotary tool. (I'd recommend a Proxxon over a Dremel, if you don't already have one.) That allows me to polish the edge to refined sharpness. This same equipment can be used to sharpen many kinds of small tools, and are indispensable for me.

As is often recommended by machinists for resharpened drill bits, use factory new ones for your most critical work.

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