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What's on your bench?


Craig Tucker

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On my bench is a little, old three quarter violin with a label reading" Vecchio Tedesco" anno 1930. I think it means

"old German" Maybe Manfio will see this and translate it. " Vecchio Tedesco" Approssimare 1930 Ricostriure a mano.

It is a beautiful little violin. Very good spruce and maple, with the flame running slightly downward toward the center.

No open cracks or seams that I can see. Someone partially stripped the varnish and left a big mess.It really needs a

neck re-set, but first I am going to try to make it work by re- notching the grooves in the saddle a few mms, and

moving the tail cord over. Big job ahead with all the things that need to be done. Going to try yet another experimental

ground coat. Hope to be able to post some pictures in about a month.

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an update on what is on my "bench"

the front of N5 has received its bass bar and the back arching is half finished with the purfling channel on its way.

Number four varnish is still drying

The very elongated and pointy corners will be vulnerable to bow damage on the treble side.

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yeh, I was taught to carve it away, seems natural to me.. just wondering..as with so many things we "learn" with out understanding why...thanks ...anyone else know the theory?

Not sure about the theory - but it seems nutural to me to leave it straight across. If the plate seems a bit heavy I sometimes take it out. Seems good to me keep the plate stiff around two vulnerable areas.

Geoff

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CT I hope this doen't step OT to muchI'm currently doing the edgework shuffle on #8&9.and getting a little bugeyed. I will be starting the scooping soon so this strand is helpfull to me - thanks.

Not sure about the theory - but it seems nutural to me to leave it straight across. If the plate seems a bit heavy I sometimes take it out. Seems good to me keep the plate stiff around two vulnerable areas.

Geoff

HMMM Ok. so how were you taught? Perhaps that helps teach a "natural" responce? I can "see" an effect tonaly but not sure how to define it. mass and stiffness also inplane motion and out of plane motion effects.

Another guestion I have is, what about leaving a slightly thicker section in the top plate- near the bass bar ends to help support that area and resist distortion? kinda like a buttress.

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CT I hope this doen't step OT to muchI'm currently doing the edgework shuffle on #8&9.and getting a little bugeyed. I will be starting the scooping soon so this strand is helpfull to me - thanks.

HMMM Ok. so how were you taught? Perhaps that helps teach a "natural" responce? I can "see" an effect tonaly but not sure how to define it. mass and stiffness also inplane motion and out of plane motion effects.

Another guestion I have is, what about leaving a slightly thicker section in the top plate- near the bass bar ends to help support that area and resist distortion? kinda like a buttress.

I don't remember being taught one way or the other. My gut feeling is that a 'smoother', guitar shaped profile internally is maybe better than having 'bumps' sticking out either end. Not very scientific I'm afraid.

Geoff

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Robertdo / If I may ...what is the theory behind the uncarved areas around the end blocks ? is it to reinforce the edge ..or an acoustic consideration? thanks for the great thread CT

I think the earliest mention I know of is in the Sacconi book and it might also be drawn into the diagrams of graduation schemes. But, not ever having seen the inside of a Strad or other Cremonese I have no idea how accurate the translation is or if it was commonly done.

It seems like a lot of extra weight and if the arching is full in those areas it would add even more.

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CT I hope this doen't step OT to muchI'm currently doing the edgework shuffle on #8&9.and getting a little bugeyed. I will be starting the scooping soon so this strand is helpfull to me - thanks.

HMMM Ok. so how were you taught? Perhaps that helps teach a "natural" responce? I can "see" an effect tonaly but not sure how to define it. mass and stiffness also inplane motion and out of plane motion effects.

Another guestion I have is, what about leaving a slightly thicker section in the top plate- near the bass bar ends to help support that area and resist distortion? kinda like a buttress.

Not at all, I have wondered about this point.

I'm guessing that the "straight across platform" is there to ward off physical plate distortion - and that, properly done, there is not a tonal penalty.

Originally I was taught to follow the blocks around, then I tried the straight line method, and I liked what it did for the plate. Now, for what it's worth, I incorporate a compound curve that is somewhere in between the two.

Then, the bridge area comes under suspicion, which is where thickness, arch and stiffness (properly split and quartered wood) come into play. Those three points are key stress points in my point of view - in particular, for some time down the road.

That's my guess.

As far as your bass bar question goes - I agree, there are decisions to be made there also.

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As far as your bass bar question goes - I agree, there are decisions to be made there also.

But, personally, I wouldn't think thickness where you suggest it, is necessary. The bar itself already "over engineers" spreading that bass bridge foot pressure over a wide area. And it (the bar) supports the arch overall.

Adding thickness to the plate there would (in my opinion) add mass where you don't really want it.

But, I don't want to tell you what is appropriate for you either, perhaps you go thinner in that area than I do?

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Finally finished my cello project.

I have a little bridge tuning to do.

Sounds sweet. I'll be uploading a

soundbite to flickr this week.

Fruits of a year of dreaming, fund raising and working.

I have a fiddle made by William Low Smith of acacia

wood in 1967. I'm checking the setup on it.

I'm pondering shelving my Ole Bull until I can find

whiter evenly curled back. Some replacement material

looks more suitable for a new project.

I'd like to complete 4 more new instruments this year.

I want to practice my scroll carving.

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Here's the bass I was working on earlier. There are a few things that I want to change, the plate holding the electronics would look better if it were made from a lighter wood light cherry.

post-24240-0-38446600-1300752051_thumb.jpg

Also, I have a small cnc machine that I bought in order to rough out scrolls and violin backs for me. I could use it for top plates too but those are so much less work to rough out that I will keep doing that by hand. Over the weekend I carved a few scrolls and roughed out a few backs. Next I'll make some molds for a new violin pattern, then make sides and tops.

post-24240-0-01790600-1300752267_thumb.jpg

post-24240-0-78376000-1300752281_thumb.jpg

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Not at all, I have wondered about this point.

I'm guessing that the "straight across platform" is there to ward off physical plate distortion - and that, properly done, there is not a tonal penalty.

Originally I was taught to follow the blocks around, then I tried the straight line method, and I liked what it did for the plate. Now, for what it's worth, I incorporate a compound curve that is somewhere in between the two.

Then, the bridge area comes under suspicion, which is where thickness, arch and stiffness (properly split and quartered wood) come into play. Those three points are key stress points in my point of view - in particular, for some time down the road.

That's my guess.

As far as your bass bar question goes - I agree, there are decisions to be made there also.

I like your thinking on this one. At one point I would not have bought into the straight across method. In my mind I have been trying to visualize the effects of more thickness in these areas. It must have some effect...depends on how much as the block extending would add stiffness in these areas anyway. After seeing the Strad 3D video I am now hesitant to leave any more thickness around the f holes. I am rethinking my "Little Red Books". Sounds like another topic is in order :)

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I now have 4 neck blocks on the bench that I sliced out of a big-leaf maple hunk that was sitting around, to go along with the 4 sets of tops and backs previously cooked up.

This was the first job for my Agazzani 24" bandsaw, on which I have completed the variable speed drive conversion.

I like it :). I was barely able to restrain myself from cutting up more wood, just for the fun of it.

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been shopp'in a lot these days....got a prety good blacksmith job and so I've not had much time ...a happy problem for sure, thanks all for the comments on plate grads details ,,, or whatever we're calling the flat area around the blocks. I would be very curious about what the ol boys did.

CT I see what you are saying about the force of the bass bar being spread out /maybe more important on a cello,,, the question was inspired by a recentstrad article describing a fallen section at the ends of the bar.

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I like your thinking on this one. At one point I would not have bought into the straight across method. In my mind I have been trying to visualize the effects of more thickness in these areas. It must have some effect...depends on how much as the block extending would add stiffness in these areas anyway. After seeing the Strad 3D video I am now hesitant to leave any more thickness around the f holes. I am rethinking my "Little Red Books". Sounds like another topic is in order :)

The "Little Red books" have a lot to say, (a lot of good and interesting information) but, there is a lot to weed out also, in my opinion, like many violin books that are based on one person's ideas and opinions about what works and why.

I do know good makers who swear that they are violin making Bible(s). And Ed Campbell is a quite talented maker and a wonderful teacher. If you start a thread based on this topic - I would like to read everyones opinion on the matter.

I hope no one is offended by this observation, I have never been a big CAS fan either, so there you have it.

I did notice that in another concurent thread, Jeremy Davis's thread about the bull headed violin, that the inside belly shot has a top and bottom block platform shaped like the ones I said I now use - halfway between the two extremes - though I do not incorporate the abrupt drop off that this maker uses.

It's interesting to me that many of these ideas have been floating around for a while.

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