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What's on your bench?


Craig Tucker

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Iburkard,

Pre-ban ivory. There is pencil graphite in grooves that, I believe, makes the string look too deep. It's a work in progress. I'm going to lower the strings more to my liking. Reason why I positioned the inserts this low in the bridge. I've also made up a bridge for the same violin with tagua nut inserts. Thinking about a mammoth and maybe other materrials for the inserts. I'm probably tinkering with my old wore out ears more than the instrument, trying to see if I can discern the difference between different bridges on the same machine. This is about my eighth or tenth bridge (total). A scroungy beginner; I have a lot to learn. That's why I'm in here. Thanks for any feedback/advice.

Steve

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Thinking about a mammoth and maybe other materrials for the inserts. I'm probably tinkering with my old wore out ears more than the instrument, trying to see if I can discern the difference between different bridges on the same machine. This is about my eighth or tenth bridge (total). A scroungy beginner; I have a lot to learn. That's why I'm in here. Thanks for any feedback/advice.

Steve

Steve,

Very interesting.

If you need a bit of mammoth, PM me.

This reminds me a little bit of one of my routine meatball repairs (not that what you are doing is meatball) where the bridge is too low. Some of the violins I get in for repair are so cheap, that they do not even warrent a new low grade bridge, so occasionally I will use ebony squares and the square needle file in order to insert a hard platform under the string just to get them working...

This $79 beauty (for the violin, case, and bow) had the E string laying on the fingerboard (when new) - five minutes tops for the repair.

I don't like to even waste time thinking about how to go about doing these type of repairs, and so, I have some quick, cheap, routine repairs that are ready to go - like this one.

post-3950-0-03712400-1298680942_thumb.jpg

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ctviolin,

That's an interesting quick-fix and it probably got a student playing at a reasonable cost, I suppose. A large part of the efficient repair of anything is the initial assesment of the most efficient fix for the existing problem. One cannot be justified in doing a heart transplant on a heartburn patient nor trying to treat an amputation by applying a band-aid. Thinking about what I just typed, I'm not certain that it fits or makes sense.

At any rate, the ebony mini-block fix looks like a quick and appropriate fix for the instance that you described.

Steve

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ctviolin,

That's an interesting quick-fix and it probably got a student playing at a reasonable cost, I suppose. A large part of the efficient repair of anything is the initial assesment of the most efficient fix for the existing problem. One cannot be justified in doing a heart transplant on a heartburn patient nor trying to treat an amputation by applying a band-aid. Thinking about what I just typed, I'm not certain that it fits or makes sense.

At any rate, the ebony mini-block fix looks like a quick and appropriate fix for the instance that you described.

Steve

Correct.

Anymore at least half of the school kids I get in the shop, are for repairs on under $100.00 online violin kits. Many families here are at the poverty level. I have a reputation with the teachers for repairing almost anything. It's both a good and a bad thing - some times I think I'm simply wasting time.

Then again, some of the students come back for years for real repairs and rehairs, even past graduation, and a few have wound up buying one of my own instruments as an upgrade when they outgrow their student instrument. In a small town like Roswell, word gets around.

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Here's numbers 3, 4, and 5. I've been working on them for a while now bringing them along all at the same sequence to reinforce the making skills. Bellys have the bars installed and are essentially ready to go. The ribsets are done except for thinning the linings and final shaping of the blocks. I have 2 of the backs arched and the third one I'll go and start the arching as soon as I figure out how to upload the pics! How much fun can a guy have!!!

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Here's numbers 3, 4, and 5.

Mike,

Nice.

#'s 4&5 (the dark maple ones) are slab cut, right? What kind of maple are you using? Is it local?

Under varnish that wood is going to look superb. I love that slab grain pattern.

Are you thinking that you might have to color the bellies darker in order to match the maple, or are you going to go with a "contrasty" look?

I've seen makers go either way.

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Here's numbers 3, 4, and 5. I've been working on them for a while now bringing them along all at the same sequence to reinforce the making skills. Bellys have the bars installed and are essentially ready to go. The ribsets are done except for thinning the linings and final shaping of the blocks. I have 2 of the backs arched and the third one I'll go and start the arching as soon as I figure out how to upload the pics! How much fun can a guy have!!!

Posh bench!

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Ernie,

Those corners are long and I think I will shorten them up just a bit As I have a tiny bit of room for adjustment. I'm lovingly refering to this instrument as my mongrel as it has a bunch of different influences combined, hopefully they won't be to misplaced when combined into one instrument! Amati form, Del Gesu ish ffs and arching.

Craig,

It's some type of soft maple, sorry I can't tell you more than that. It was some figured wood we picked up years ago at the shop I work at that came from a hardwood seller in the East. the color was too dark for the project so it sat around for years. I got necks, ribs and backs for 3 and 4 from that one piece. The fronts for those two are sitka and engleman. 5 is red maple and red spruce from a Robert Crosby here in Vt. I'm not sure about the finish yet as I haven't done any tests to see how it will look. Thanks for starting this thread Craig!

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If you had knocked on my door 2pm Friday, you would have caught me

"yellow handed". I had just mixed a batch of oil color glaze

to apply by hand to my cello. I had applied egg white, gamboge and

a thin coat of spirit varnish days before applying the color.

A big yellow cello hangs in my workroom under UV lights.

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On my bench now..

David B. Youallknowwho will probably call it kinky, but I'm just trying to carve a cupids head!

Very nice.

(Seems appropriate, it has been my overwhelming experience that cupid is often at least a bit kinky)

On the bench today.

As you can see progress is being made on the quilt back - today I hope to purfle it.

Edgework, corner work and purfling have always been one of my weakest areas. Please feel free to point out the obvious errors this far. For me, this is better than usual. I could use some constructive criticism, as my edgework never looks anywhere near top notch. I’m going to use all wood purfling for the first time today, because I’m tired of the way fiber purfling “smears” when worked…

Purfling groove a tad too close to the edge?

Should I make the channel further in and treat the edge accordingly and ignore its proximity to the purfling?

Thanks for looking.

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