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What's on your bench?


Craig Tucker

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Well...OK..not on the bench but in the garden. Long pattern Strad copy in the first stages of antiquing

Hi Melving,

It's nice to see someone making a long pattern Strad copy. I've only made one long pattern copy which is in my workshop today for some retouching.

Here's a couple of quick bench photos of my attempt at this model:

post-28884-0-63381600-1306957514_thumb.jpg

post-28884-0-66313000-1306957470_thumb.jpg

And one old 'studio' shot of the back:

post-28884-0-36107800-1306957551_thumb.jpg

I'll be curious what kind of sound and playing qualities your copy produces.

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I don't understand the expression "fanned out". Do you mean they stick out of the arching? If so then it's not really intended but rather a consequence of the f-holes fluting. I could not say how it affects the plate flexibility. In my nearly non existent experience in making violin I can only thickness the top plate until I feel like it's bending correctly when I twist it along the long arch or across the arch. I believe these movement define the 2 most important modes (I don't know which ones). For this violin I was pleased the way it was bending (after the F-holes have been cut and fluted), and the resulting sound is really balanced. Also maybe a consequence of using oil varnish instead or spirit like for the first 3 violins, I can play piano or forte much easier with this one. It was more difficult for me to play piano with the first 3 ones. So all in all I feel like I am improving in sound and aesthetic. Of course the varnishing step are still messy. But I am really trying a different way each time, so ...

The body of the f-hole seems to slope at a wider angle than what I've normally seen. Again, I'm not sure if the fluting and angle of shot is causing it to look this way, but it looks extreme from the picture I'm looking at. As in, horizontally, the f-hole seems to take up a wider area of space.

Maybe I'm seeing things. I'd have to have a straight frontal view to know for sure.

How do you like oil varnish? I've never tried it, and many people have seemed to warn against it. I've never really been clear on why, though.

Great looking instrument! You should be proud of it.

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I see what you mean. Here is a front view. It's true that the f-holes deviate slightly from the square that they are supposed to represent. I wanted to keep the upper holes 38mm apart as stated on the poster and at the same time I didn't want the lower wing to be too far from the edge. I guess I compromised. Actually it's mostly the treble side F-hole that "fan" away the most.

the oil varnish I used is the one M. Darnton gave as a recipe that is safe to make, so I used this mastic/turpentine/oil recipe. the only problem for me is the drying time. But I used this same varnish for number 5 too.

I didn't get the same transparency and 3D impression I add with the spirit varnish I bought though. But it might be because I am not knowledgeable enough yet. But it's easy and quick to make. If you have a UV cabinet the drying time is not an issue and (almost) everybody agrees that oil varnish was used by old masters... :)

thanks, I really like this one too, although it's a smaller model.

post-29661-0-05558100-1306964798_thumb.jpg

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Hi Melving,

It's nice to see someone making a long pattern Strad copy. I've only made one long pattern copy which is in my workshop today for some retouching.

Here's a couple of quick bench photos of my attempt at this model:

post-28884-0-63381600-1306957514_thumb.jpg

post-28884-0-66313000-1306957470_thumb.jpg

And one old 'studio' shot of the back:

post-28884-0-36107800-1306957551_thumb.jpg

I'll be curious what kind of sound and playing qualities your copy produces.

Hi Guy Your long pattern copy looks terrific! I look forward to comparing notes.

Melvin.

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I see what you mean. Here is a front view. It's true that the f-holes deviate slightly from the square that they are supposed to represent. I wanted to keep the upper holes 38mm apart as stated on the poster and at the same time I didn't want the lower wing to be too far from the edge. I guess I compromised. Actually it's mostly the treble side F-hole that "fan" away the most.

the oil varnish I used is the one M. Darnton gave as a recipe that is safe to make, so I used this mastic/turpentine/oil recipe. the only problem for me is the drying time. But I used this same varnish for number 5 too.

I didn't get the same transparency and 3D impression I add with the spirit varnish I bought though. But it might be because I am not knowledgeable enough yet. But it's easy and quick to make. If you have a UV cabinet the drying time is not an issue and (almost) everybody agrees that oil varnish was used by old masters... :)

thanks, I really like this one too, although it's a smaller model.

Thanks so much for all the information! Looks like a real beauty, and you've given me quite a bit to chew on.

Cheers!

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My latest one,

a baroque version of an Andrea Amati small violin pattern. Completed yesterday. I still have to do a few adjustments though.

More picture of it being built on my blog. And thanks to all of you on this forum as reading it opened my eyes on many things (violin making related!)

post-25220-0-52065200-1307392692_thumb.jpgpost-25220-0-67918800-1307392705_thumb.jpg

post-25220-0-41322100-1307392714_thumb.jpgpost-25220-0-08572900-1307392726_thumb.jpg

post-25220-0-34259500-1307392742_thumb.jpgpost-25220-0-49313200-1307392756_thumb.jpg

-Tom

Tom,thats bitchen(to quote Zappa)

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How does one define "amateur"? Seriously...in sports, I am told you lose amateur status when you accept money for competing, although I am told that this line has blurred over the years.

In lutherie, it seems to be a case of "you didn't go to the right schools" or "failed to submit to a proper old-world apprenticeship", or something. I have heard well-known, repsected makers referred to as amateurs by other well-known respected makers, when both are making a decent living at the craft.

Some of the makers here who are commonly called amateur make more at lutherie than I do at my "day-job".

The French verb "amar" (to love) is the root of the word, "amateur" which means one who does it for love. I would hope that the best luthiers are those who keep at it because of a love for the craft, but the word is usually used to indicate "less than professional".

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How does one define "amateur"?

The French verb "amar" (to love) is the root of the word, "amateur" which means one who does it for love. I would hope that the best luthiers are those who keep at it because of a love for the craft, but the word is usually used to indicate "less than professional".

great post cob, love the work

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