Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

What's on your bench?


Craig Tucker

Recommended Posts

That machine of yours is surely a strange looking thing. Reminds me of old machine tools from the 1700s where wood was a major component. I don't quite understabd what is it for. Is it supposed to make patterns only ? And then the pattern will be used on a pantograph ? Why not use the machine to directly carve the plates ??

I am not sure which machine you mean. There are two. The first picture is my original pantograph with a larger (incompleted) one behind it. I used the small one for roughing violin/viola plates. The drawback was that I did not have a way to make exactly the patterns I wanted.

The second machine with the screws is driven by a computer program. It will cut exactly where the router is told to go. CNC means "computer numerical control." It will be SLOW. The pantograph is convenient and fast as it is opperated only by hand. It will be worth my time and money to simply make a new one for actual roughing of plates.

Wood was convenient only because I had 10-year old lumber and I can't weld steel. It is rigid and stable. That is the only reason to use it. Convenience.

post-6797-0-72850200-1306183854_thumb.jpg post-6797-0-35463100-1306183875_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am not sure which machine you mean. There are two. The first picture is my original pantograph with a larger (incompleted) one behind it. I used the small one for roughing plates. The drawback was that I did not have a way to make exactly the patterns I wanted.

The second machine with the screws is driven by a computer program. It will cut exactly where the router is told to go. CNC means "computer numerical control." It will be SLOW. The pantograph is convenient and fast as it is opperated only by hand. It will be worth my time and money to simply make a new one for actual roughing of plates.

Wood was convenient only because I had 10-year old lumber and I can't weld steel. It is rigid and stable. That is the only reason to use it. Convenience.

post-6797-0-72850200-1306183854_thumb.jpg post-6797-0-35463100-1306183875_thumb.jpg

I don't understand why you split the making in two. OK, I know nothing about making violins. Are you seeling a single kind of violin so fast you need also a pantograph ? Can't the machine with motors do the job ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't understand why you split the making in two. OK, I know nothing about making violins. Are you seeling a single kind of violin so fast you need also a pantograph ? Can't the machine with motors do the job ?

Yes it could. I hollow a plate with two islands a little above and below the pairs of corners. I attach patterns to these for edging and purfling. I am not sure I would be able to easily represent the islands in the machine code, although I will probably try it before making the pantograph. And yes, I would save money. It depends on how ambitious I get.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thats what I was taught to do ..leave the garlad glued to the mold until the back is on and the top is ready...trimming the linning in the mold... I'm gonna try top first, then neck set, then remove the mold ,install linnings trim, then glue the back on, on the next set#8&9,,,,Unless I hear a better way. or one I think is better....

I say go for it, and I'm guessing you'll find it makes the neck setting much more efficient with results more positively assured. My advice to that is leave the heel of the of the neck long when the setting is done, and level heel to the back rib/block surface after the setting.

Good luck.

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I say go for it, and I'm guessing you'll find it makes the neck setting much more efficient with results more positively assured. My advice to that is leave the heel of the of the neck long when the setting is done, and level heel to the back rib/block surface after the setting.

Good luck.

Steve

I won't have a 4th rotation axis. But in the past, I have used a full-width mould and cut the mortice roughly at that time. Setting a neck is a bit time consuming, but not terribly so. I thought of a z-rotation gimmick to rough scrolls, but that is in the future. It would provide a measuring guide to carve by hand.... intriguing, but not sure I will do it. (I will not make the mould on the CNC, I use pattern followers and carbide-steel sleeve grinders in a drill-press. Especially nice for getting perfect shapes in corner blocks.)

post-6797-0-38591600-1306207655_thumb.jpg

My Z-axis is not high enough to cut the mortice on the CNC. No real loss.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is not "cheating", it is more a method of measuring. At least for me. I was not happy with my arching shapes, and templates from posters was not for me. I am especially interested in where to place the inflection in the curve. I think this must be important for several reasons.

The Strad (May 2007) Making Accurate Arching Templates by Raymond Schryer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, OK. I have made topographical maps from other people's data. If one had a complete plaster mould, why measure just a few points? I would expect that the plaster mould could have been used to make a positive image casting.

Then everybody could make a plaster negative and another epoxy positive of his own. Makes sense......... And use the positive in a pantograph. After all, the idea the article suggests is to COPY something. Why lose information and detail in the method used in the first pdf?

There is a difference between being romantic and being stupid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Edit: Roger, if you pass on the forum, can you confirm the scribe line is outside of the ribs, it´s not very clear for me in your book (my English is quite "basic"), and is it the black line I see???? on this photograph? Thanks.

It has been many many years since I saw the Ex Reynier Strad, but the scribe line is very faint on the upper bass rib on the belly side. I am not sure but I think that you can just see it on this photograph. Don't expect a deep scratch. I seem to remember that Hieronymus Köstler has better pictures of this scribe line. Let me know if you find it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...