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Josh Henry

Broken bow screws

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Cornish game hens are just baby chickens, of a meat breed, not a dual purpose or layer. Most are actually either the Cornish breed, or a Rock X Cornish cross. But babies.

A human puts out about 2 BTU’s per pound, a chicken takes 8–9K BTU’s to cook... you do the math. If you want a chicken dinner anytime soon, you should probably ask David Burgess to contact the Irish fiddler Hulk Hogan (in his avatar) to produce the BTU’s.

:blink:

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Isn't there some American guy who plays the fastest "Flight of the Bumble Bee" - that's the guy we need if we're cooking chicken.

Sorry, German - David Garrett. If his bowing doesn't produce enough heat we could always make a little bonfire with shards of violin.

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Bonfire. I have a Czech 3/4 that I can donate. The rosin varnish should give the game hen a nice retsina tasting glaze.

Addie, just fiddling around in the kitchen. :rolleyes::lol:

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It's all very well to joke about bow heating, but recall that flour dust is responsible for granary explosions; the proper air/powder ratio will support hyper-rapid combustion.

That being so, the more progressive states are contemplating banning the amateur performance of Flight of the Bumblebee. Rosin dust plus bow friction has resulted in at least one youtube video (alas, I've misplaced the link) wherein a flash fire does serious damage to a performer's facial hair.

Leave that sort of thing to the professionals; don't try it at home.

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I had something happen to me this week that has never happened before—I was tightening up a bow to apply rosin on it after a rehair, and the screw broke. It broke in half at the eyelet, such that the frog became stuck, and wouldn't move forward or backward. At that particular moment, the spirit of cuss entered my shop…<_< I was able to free it and replace the screw before the owner arrived (yes, I did tell them what happened), but I've never had a screw break on me before. The bow was a nice, fairly new German handmade bow that I had rehaired several times in the past, and there was no significant wear on either the screw or eyelet.

Additionally, over the last several weeks, I have had 4 other bows in my shop to repair this very same damage. They all had broken screws at the eyelet. This is usually an occasional repair in my shop (maybe 6 times a year), but I've never seen such a flow of broken screws concentrated into such a short time period. On all of the bows, there was no particular reason (like crooked screwholes) to merit a broken screw.

My question is this—Could the breaking of screws be due to the cold weather/low humidity season that we are in? I know metal get brittle in extreme cold, but we're talking about bows that are used by professional players, and treated with the same care as their instruments. Is the breaking of screws coincidence or cold-weather related?

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Josh, I would also be very interested to know how you remove the frog and broken screw in these cases. I am unfortunately the only competent bow rehairer within 100 miles of several prestigous music camp/festivals and am called on to rehair bows for major artists on an emergency basis. This sort of story gives me nightmares!

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Josh, I would also be very interested to know how you remove the frog and broken screw in these cases. I am unfortunately the only competent bow rehairer within 100 miles of several prestigous music camp/festivals and am called on to rehair bows for major artists on an emergency basis. This sort of story gives me nightmares!

I'm with Nathan... A break ahead of the eyelet is easy... but I can't imagine what would work if the break is at the butt end of the eyelet or even within the screwhole behind the mortise ...... Josh you got us going!???

Cheers, Mat

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If I was faced with such a situation, I would disassemble the frog, and drill down through the eyelet screw until the frog can be removed.

You would have to plug the hole in the frog afterwards and install a new eyelet.

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you could out-law saws-all bowing. I think that would be a big contributor. but more water from the solar ice caps melting might help the environment anyway.

:lol:

David did you send Josh your bows? :D

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hhhhuuuuuhhhhhh!!!!!!!!

surely you know global warming would cause a rise in sea level, eventually wiping out coastal properties, it is feared whole islands in the pacific and indian ocean will become uninhabitable as theyre barely above sea level now

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if youre pro global warming, joshua, i hope you dont own beachfront property!!

NO! i dont own beach front property. but, I waited for the earthquake and it didnt come. So, this is my second chance to getting beach front property.

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Josh, I would also be very interested to know how you remove the frog and broken screw in these cases. I am unfortunately the only competent bow rehairer within 100 miles of several prestigous music camp/festivals and am called on to rehair bows for major artists on an emergency basis. This sort of story gives me nightmares!

I'm with Nathan... A break ahead of the eyelet is easy... but I can't imagine what would work if the break is at the butt end of the eyelet or even within the screwhole behind the mortise ...... Josh you got us going!???

Cheers, Mat

Returning this thread back to the topic…

In the 16 months since I started this topic, I've had only one other bow with a broken screw cross my workbench. It is truly interesting how things like this will come into the shop in batches. I guess there is no easy answer for this repair as each one is slightly different. I'll try to post the different techniques that I find work for this kind of thing.

I find that usually the screw breaks when the bow is under tension, so I'll first release the tension of the hair from the stick. Much of the time, I'll just cut the hair away as a rehair is due anyway, but if the hair is still good (as in the one in the original post that I had just rehaired) I'll use an awl or sharp point through the hair ribbon to extract the head plug. Once the tension is gone, the frog can often be moved back and forth in the stick mortise. Sometimes at this point, if you are lucky, the frog can be moved back in the mortise far enough for the upper part of the screw to clear the upper screw hole, and the frog will just lift off. However, this is seldom the case.

The first thing that I'll try is to move the frog all the way back towards the end of the stick, and then thread the broken part of the screw back into the eyelet, driving the upper part out with the lower part. If this works, once you unscrew the lower part of the screw, the frog can be removed from the stick and the broken upper part of the screw will fall out of the mortise.

However, that doesn't always work, so sometimes it is necessary to cut the eyelet shaft with a small saw blade. There is often lots of movement on the frog because the lower part of the screw is missing (this would ordinarily hold the frog seated firmly on the stick), so the back can often be lifted up away from the stick so that a small stiff saw blade can be inserted to cut the eyelet. Often, a gap of three to five millimeters can be seen--enough for the sawblade.This has to be done carefully so as not to cut into the stick or the silver underslide. I use a dental saw blade for this because they are stiff enough to resist bending and the cut is coarse enough to be effective. This is done entirely by hand, with no saw frame due to lack of clearance under the frog.

In the most extreme cases where the frog is stuck with no movement or clearance (such as when the bow has a rusted-in screw) I'll remove the ferrule, pearl slide, and the hair and plug so I can mill out the eyelet from the inside of the frog. This was covered in an earlier thread (read about it here).

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Just now read the thread.

Sorry if this takes it off-topic again (and don't mean to dilute good input from Josh and others), but thanks for the ribbing, guys. It put a smile on my face, and has me looking forward to tomorrow.

That's valuable to a nearly worn-out old fiddlemaker. :)

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Don't be glum Mr. Burgess!

I know that all the roads aren't paved with gold...*ahem*...but I hope you realize that you are a true inspiration to all of us here. Especially us young(er) guys! (I hope to have triceps like you someday!)

So chin up!

...here is some motivation if you're feeling low:

http://www.buzzfeed.com/mjs538/13-simple-steps-to-get-you-through-a-rough-day

...Back to the topic, broken screws are a bitch, no way around that. Just remember to do no harm, and take your time. Where there's a will, there's a way! B)

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theres a lot of things you can say about our david burgess, all good i hope, one thing, if that really is him in his avatar picture, hes the only maestronet member with a sex tape on the internet!!!

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Thanks for the inspiration and encouragement, Skywalker.

Spent nearly a decade perched on low tree limbs, hoping to "drop goo" on unsuspecting female passers-by. Not as easy as it sounds, especially when it comes to getting the timing right.

Jeffrey, if this post disappears by tomorrow morning, I totally understand.

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hey Josh, I see that you have made a good recipe for repairing this problem, but did you ever figure out the cause.

Yep, I figgered out the problem--it's the players! They keep turning their bow screws. If they'd just leave 'em alone, there would be no problem. Seriously though, I think all of them coming in at once was just a combination of the phase of the moon and bad cooking.

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