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violin9858

Passione violin strings

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Hello,

Has anyone had any experience with the Passione strings; if so, have you discovered they still need constant tuning after a normal break in period. Or once settled and properly stretched, will they stay in tune during play?

I have been playing the pi titaniums and they work great. However, the reason I'm asking is I have a set of Passione's still in the tube and want to try them, but became skeptical after reading so many reviews, yet in the January 2011 issue of Strings, the writer suggests they settle quickly and require minimum tuning after they settle. For any of you that have played Passione and since you guys are makers, any thoughts on Passione break in and will they settle pitchwise?

Thanks,

Don

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Hello,

Has anyone had any experience with the Passione strings; if so, have you discovered they still need constant tuning after a normal break in period. Or once settled and properly stretched, will they stay in tune during play?

I have been playing the pi titaniums and they work great. However, the reason I'm asking is I have a set of Passione's still in the tube and want to try them, but became skeptical after reading so many reviews, yet in the January 2011 issue of Strings, the writer suggests they settle quickly and require minimum tuning after they settle. For any of you that have played Passione and since you guys are makers, any thoughts on Passione break in and will they settle pitchwise?

Thanks,

Don

I, also, read Erin's article with interest.

Everyone knows the downside of gut strings so there would be no point in relaunching more of the same.

I'd be interested to know how the gut is processed differently to reduce stretching but, for now,we just have to accept that it is so.

I'd like to try them.

Glenn

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Hello,

Has anyone had any experience with the Passione strings; if so, have you discovered they still need constant tuning after a normal break in period. Or once settled and properly stretched, will they stay in tune during play?

I have been playing the pi titaniums and they work great. However, the reason I'm asking is I have a set of Passione's still in the tube and want to try them, but became skeptical after reading so many reviews, yet in the January 2011 issue of Strings, the writer suggests they settle quickly and require minimum tuning after they settle. For any of you that have played Passione and since you guys are makers, any thoughts on Passione break in and will they settle pitchwise?

Thanks,

Don

I have had three sets of Passione on different fiddles. Yes they take a while to settle down but then they are very reliable, tuning wise.

I use them for a week or so but always return to Evahs or Obligatos purely because of the slight difference in response time between gut and non gut.

They produce a darker warmer sound than most strings, nice for solo Bach, but not so good for whizzing around in my experience.

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I, also, read Erin's article with interest.

Everyone knows the downside of gut strings so there would be no point in relaunching more of the same.

I'd be interested to know how the gut is processed differently to reduce stretching but, for now,we just have to accept that it is so.

I'd like to try them.

Glenn

From what I read the Passione strings are an hybrid gut/perlon (or the equivalent), so they are not real gut strings like Eudoxa or Olive.

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The Pirastro web site says:

"The combination in manufacturing of modern synthetic and traditional gut technology"

i.e. it is the manufacturing technology that is the combination, not the components of the string.

Andrew

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Olivs sound smoother under the ear than Passione Solo or regular, imho... Tuning-wise, Passiones seem to stabilize well after a few days...but, at least with my bowing technique, the strings were fussy - giving forth the occasional, unintentional barking noise! Maybe that would go away if I left them on for more than a week... Anyway, Passiones definitely have more edge than Olivs, which may be better for soloists...?

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The Pirastro web site says:

"The combination in manufacturing of modern synthetic and traditional gut technology"

i.e. it is the manufacturing technology that is the combination, not the components of the string.

Andrew

Thanks Andrew, but I'm now confused again.

Either it's gut or it isn't. If it's a natural product it must suffer from the vagaries of consistency and reliability.

I can't help feeling that a strand or two of Perlon has been slipped into the string to help take the strain.

Glenn

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Well the full quote from the web site is:

The combination in manufacturing of modern synthetic and traditional gut technology made it possible to retain the sound beauty of gut core strings and to increase significantly the tuning stability and the break-in-time.

So what they are saying is (I infer) that the older strings such as Eudoxa were made with older technology. As they have developed newer synthetic strings, so has their manufacturing technology developed. They have now applied this new technology to gut strings and Passione is the result.

This of course makes one wonder why they didn't simply transfer the improved technology to the manufacture of the older types of gut strings. Possibly the answer lies in the 'more brands, more market share' theory.

Andrew

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From what I understand, there is a new coating that they put on the gut cores to make them more impervious to humidity changes. From my experience, they are still fairly temperamental strings. If you have a carefully climate-controlled (read, humidity as well) practice space, you'll love them. If not, you're going to be tuning a lot.

Sound and power is great. Response is nice and quick. Note that gut is plenty damn fast but has a very different response to bow inputs. There's a certain roll and snap that gut has that's quite different than synthetic strings. Once you figure out how to control it, it's quite manageable and quick.

I was excited about these strings since gut has a sound that is yet to be equaled. However, I found myself tuning waaay too often to make it worth it. As always, YMMV.

Cheers,

ALB

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I acquired a set of Passione Solo expressly for a performance of the Bach a-minor concerto (solo part). I had them on for 1.5 months and then switched them out for Larsons two weeks prior to the concert. My reactions:

+ Good complex sound overall

+ D and G string especially nice.

+ Fairly stable pitch after a week

- Disappointed in volume; expected more from a "solo" string

- Occasional squeaks from both E and A strings (first time I've had A-squeak)

- Not quite as responsive as I needed for the Bach (rapid string crossings in 3rd movement)

Caveat: my violin has only moderate projection, so my issue with volume may be due more to the instrument than the strings, although the Larsons were stronger.

HS

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Hello all!

I've been using Passiones G, D, A and Obligato E on my violin (Mirecourt violin from the late 1800's). On the same violin I've tried also Pirastro Tonica and Evah Pirazzis.

For me, all of them are very good choice, but Passiones beat the other because:

- A smooth sound on the low strings. More power on the G and D.

- More complex sound, more "gut" sound. It benefits the overall sound, being very rich in harmonics.

- They keep his sound for month. The sound not become worse within months.

On the other side, it's true they have very few response and tension, but I still prefer them over Tonica and Evah.

Thank you all!!

Rubén

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Hi,

I've been using Passione Solo strings for about a year now, I've found their tuning to be just as stable on my violin as Evah Pirazzis, which I had used before. I'm old enough to have grown up using gut strings as basically the only choice, when synthetics came along I wasn't very impressed by the sound. When I did finally switch it wasn't any superiority of stability or durability which moved me to change, it was simply price. Now the synthetics I was using are scarcely cheaper then the Passiones, and, for me, the sound is so much better with Passiones. Also, I cut an old Passione G-string and teased it apart; there is synthetic fibre surrounding the gut core. One final opinion.... the Passione E-string is ghastly on my violin.

Kat

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Hello,

Has anyone had any experience with the Passione strings; if so, have you discovered they still need constant tuning after a normal break in period. Or once settled and properly stretched, will they stay in tune during play?

I have been playing the pi titaniums and they work great. However, the reason I'm asking is I have a set of Passione's still in the tube and want to try them, but became skeptical after reading so many reviews, yet in the January 2011 issue of Strings, the writer suggests they settle quickly and require minimum tuning after they settle. For any of you that have played Passione and since you guys are makers, any thoughts on Passione break in and will they settle pitchwise?

Thanks,

Don

I like the passiones but prefer Evah's and evahs' cost less <_<

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I use just love Passione strings and have used them on all the violins I have made for over two years now. Always a Solo G and D and sometimes a solo A or regular A depending on the balance of the instrument. For the E I find that Kaplan works really well and has that 'old world' or sweet sound.

With the Passiones the sound under the ear is quite different to that from listening at a distance so lots of players dont always take to them. From a distance that have a complex and rich sound and seem to respond better when the sound is not forced. Unlike many synthetic strings they dont lose their brilliance with age.

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What turns me off about Passione strings is the thickness of the G string (when I use a Eudoxa or Oliv G string, I always use a 15 3/4 pm "stiff" G string) along with the lack of an aluminum D string (as opposed to a silver D string), which has been my preference ever since switching violins - my current instrument simply does not seem to like silver D strings, with their higher tension.

I'm usually using Dominant strings and occasionally PI strings, but when I choose to use wound gut I go with Eudoxa or Oliv - I've never found them to have much stability issues (besides with the Oliv A).

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