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Frederick Dale

Bogaro & Clemente cradle

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Reading about this tool in another post on this forum got me thinking "why not try making a swivel cradle assembly using a small trailer hitch ball?" A suitable locking assembly can be gotten from a local RV & Trailer parts store. I am going to try this and will post the results. It won't be made of polished brass, but it is only the results that count.

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I made a wood base for my B&C cradle. I had a piece of cocabola that i wasn't using and didn't want to pay $500 for something i will rarely use. I will try to take a picture later today and im curious to see others "cheap" :P solutions

Jesse

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Reading about this tool in another post on this forum got me thinking "why not try making a swivel cradle assembly using a small trailer hitch ball?" A suitable locking assembly can be gotten from a local RV & Trailer parts store. I am going to try this and will post the results. It won't be made of polished brass, but it is only the results that count.

Interesting idea. I'd probably start with one of the larger balls to reduce the chance of slipping during heavy work.

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I just found a rotary clamp from a robot arm for $10 at a salvage yard only a x axis rotation but strong as the day is long! I like the bowling ball Idea.

That's the way to do it but I'd expect no less from you. I wimped out and bought mine but I do like it and their customer service was excellent. I can't wait to see what you build.

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Dean,

You bought the B&C ball cradle? What do you think about it?

Mike

Hi Mike,

I bought it in 2007 and I still love working with it. It's a fine piece of well thought out machinery. It seems like the price has one up quite a bit but not as much as silver! I ordered some sterling silver stock today and I was shocked at the price change.

Would I buy it again at todays price? Yes. I could make one but I don't have time for that.

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Nobody has the foot pedal clamping Monsterballvise yet? (also available in benchtop models)

]

I love it!/ you got the*^$# How does the clamping work on the monsterball? Its not clear in the pic.

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I love it!/ you got the*^$# How does the clamping work on the monsterball? Its not clear in the pic.

On the floor model, one foot pedal pumps a hydraulic jack from the bottom to clamp, and the other releases the jack. Some serious holding power. It appears to use a bowling ball. Haven't seen the bench model.

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On the floor model, one foot pedal pumps a hydraulic jack from the bottom to clamp, and the other releases the jack. Some serious holding power. It appears to use a bowling ball. Haven't seen the bench model.

It's hard to tell from the photo but it looks like there is sheep wool on the cradle. Wouuld that have come from some safety minded support or some other odd use of sheep? :)

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It's hard to tell from the photo but it looks like there is sheep wool on the cradle. Wouuld that have come from some safety minded support or some other odd use of sheep? :)

It's handy to position the sheep. Sticking the back legs inside one's cowboy boots works OK, but there is always a better way, if one doesn't think of learning as something with a "finish line". :)

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Here is my $10 solution however if i ever buy a "kit" it would definitely be the Monster Ball Vise.

The center hole is for 1 bolt so if im in the mood to move it around i can, But ive only used the 2 outside bolts for stability.

Jesse

post-25030-0-66291400-1291135703_thumb.jpg

post-25030-0-34589400-1291135723_thumb.jpg

post-25030-0-87638100-1291135744_thumb.jpg

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This is how I'm attaching the cradle...I like the ability to turn the piece without having to unclamp...like a lazy Susan...it will have predrilled holes around circumference.

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Nobody has the foot pedal clamping Monsterballvise yet? (also available in benchtop models)

floorcello.jpg

desktop-red.jpg

http://www.monsterballvise.com/

Looks nice for the cello. But for what working steps you can it really use when the neck is the weakest fixingpoint?

Works better with this. (Available for cello) http://www.gewamusic.com/197.html?&no_cache=1&L=1&call=detail&productId=2318&searchText=tools

GEWA has the same clamping ball too. Wondering who buys from whom?

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Jesse and Ernie, you guys disappoint me. Trying to come up with a cheaper vise, but still purchasing the Bogaro & Clemente violin cradle :o

I would have thought making the cradle wouldn't be too hard :D

But as Dean said, it is a great device and a pleasure to use. I also found it great using it for carving the scroll.

Cheers, Peter

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If I thought I needed one of these, I might make one... but I'm quite happy with my turntable-type device. I can't see the need for the other degrees of freedom, at least for violin work.

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If I thought I needed one of these, I might make one... but I'm quite happy with my turntable-type device. I can't see the need for the other degrees of freedom, at least for violin work.

I think it's one of those situations where you don't realise you need it until you've got it!

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Looks nice for the cello. But for what working steps you can it really use when the neck is the weakest fixingpoint?

Almost infinite positioning is pretty darned nice for varnishing a cello.

Using a plate holding fixture, I also use it to position a violin, viola, or cello vertical when setting a neck. Almost makes it too easy. :P

Don may be fine with everything on a horizontal plane, but making is all I do, so it's handy to be able to move things on other axis to avoid repetitive motion injuries when doing archings and graduations.

The setup in the picture appears to be for final cleanup work, or for varnishing, so I doubt that the rigidity of the neck comes in to play in a major way.

John Cee kind of summed it up....

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Can't say I loved dealing with B&C, but l love their device. The lever works so easily and the ball rotates so smoothly that I move the cradle often, when working, and find I rarely orient it into the horizontal plane. One advantage of non-horizontal choices is the ability to optimize the orientation of light (either incandescent light from an articulated-arm work light or natural light from a window) across the archings. Also, orienting the work surface off horizontal allows one to optimize the line of the cut, say when using a gouge to fair the corners into the channels one has already cut over the line of the purfling. Lots of other reasons, but that's one I used today.

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Can't say I loved dealing with B&C, but l love their device. The lever works so easily and the ball rotates so smoothly that I move the cradle often, when working, and find I rarely orient it into the horizontal plane. One advantage of non-horizontal choices is the ability to optimize the orientation of light (either incandescent light from an articulated-arm work light or natural light from a window) across the archings. Also, orienting the work surface off horizontal allows one to optimize the line of the cut, say when using a gouge to fair the corners into the channels one has already cut over the line of the purfling. Lots of other reasons, but that's one I used today.

Chris

Greetings from Bellingham!

Wow Chris That is some serious good info...THANK YOU!! Something a Newbie never thinks of!

I've also taken your advice and used Red Alder on #1 linings...bent beautifully...

Love to visit next wood purchase...

-Ernie

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