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daddy-o496

3/4 violin

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Does anyone know where I can get drawings/plans for a 3/4 size violin. Thanx, Vic.

Strobel's "Useful Measurements...." book has guidelines for scaling down full-size instruments, but no plans.

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I did that too. Worked out well. I second this suggestion.

However, I will never, ever make another "small" violin. :P

Mike

Why? Inquiring minds want to know!

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Well Inquiring Mind, in the small violin arena you are competing with cheap, cheap, cheap imports. These (less than 4/4) are throw-away student instruments. It's not worth your time - unless you are a masochist with unlimited funds. :lol: Or you like to work at subsistence levels. :blink:

If you want to make violins that reasonably compensate you for your time and effort, stick with 4/4.

Also if you want to make memorable, or historic models, you must make 4/4.

The upside potential profit margin on 4/4 is unlimited, but less than 4/4 you are in competition with CHEAP imports.

How many small models have you made and sold? Or are you just leading me on for sport? :angry:

Hope you can Stay Tuned, Pebbles.

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As I recall, Roger Hargraves made the 1/4 size violin played by one of the tots at Buckingham place. Seems not just everyone is interested in cheap chinese VSO-type fiddles. Might be a hard market to penetrate, but it is there.

I would certainly make a fractional size instrument. Michael Darnton has built them occasionally, if I remember correctly. But I would not feel any need to compete with a cheap fiddle factory, if I did so-- I would cheerlfully appeal to the snob-factor in some of the yuppie families in this area, and sell them what they think they need. The same folk who buy a $12,000 guitar because they think it will make them play better.

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Well Inquiring Mind, in the small violin arena you are competing with cheap, cheap, cheap imports. These (less than 4/4) are throw-away student instruments. It's not worth your time - unless you are a masochist with unlimited funds. Or you like to work at subsistence levels.

Or...you don't make violins for a living. I am about to start a 1/2 for my doughter, Also planning to make her a 3/4. I think there won't be a bigger satisfaction than hear your doughter playing your violin!

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Or...you don't make violins for a living. I am about to start a 1/2 for my doughter, Also planning to make her a 3/4. I think there won't be a bigger satisfaction than hear your doughter playing your violin!

I agree

And not a chinesse one.

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I did that too. Worked out well. I second this suggestion.

However, I will never, ever make another "small" violin. :P

Mike

I will. I've completed two 3/4 fiddles so far and sold both as soon as they were finished. Never did that with full size. Same price. Of course, these are not student fiddles. They went to adults who need smaller instruments.

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I know two adult women professional violinists, both rather petite, one under five feet tall, who use 3/4 and 7/8 size instruments. I can imagine that talented young people might want or need a 3/4 size concert quality instrument.

What defines the size label of a violin anyhow?

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I will. I've completed two 3/4 fiddles so far and sold both as soon as they were finished. Never did that with full size. Same price. Of course, these are not student fiddles. They went to adults who need smaller instruments.

Do they sound really much brighter than full size?

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Do they sound really much brighter than full size?

It must be necessary to do more than simply reduce everything by a constant ratio. A smaller plate would be stiffer than a bigger one wouldn't it? So adjustments to graduations or arching might have to be made. And shorter string length would affect the string tension, too.

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I made a 7/8ths sized version of the "Glennie" Strad in school that sounded as well as most of my full sized instruments-definitely not over bright. I've also seen a modern Italian recently (can't remember the maker, sorry) that, while the owner wasn't aware of the fact, was scaled to 7/8ths in every respect that I measured. I suspect there may be a market for slightly undersized instruments if they have a good tone.

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It must be necessary to do more than simply reduce everything by a constant ratio. A smaller plate would be stiffer than a bigger one wouldn't it? So adjustments to graduations or arching might have to be made. And shorter string length would affect the string tension, too.

I think that making the width a bit more than scale, rib height more than scale, and graduations thinner than scale would be the best bet. Jim B. built a 1/2 size like that, and it was quite impressive sounding.

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